The Fresh Loaf

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Ciabatta

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earth3rd's picture
earth3rd

This is my latest attempt at Ciabatta. I used this recipe:  


Jason's Quick Coccodrillo Ciabatta Bread


I have to be honest though... I liked the Ciabatta No Knead better. I liked the flavour of the No Knead bread better. I must admit that the Jason's Quick Coccodrillo Ciabatta might have had a more open crumb and is a pretty looking loaf it just lacked in taste. Here are a couple of photo's.


This is the measurments I used for 2 loaves.


233 gr. bread flour


100 gr. semolina


4.7 gr. yeast


10  gr. salt


320 gr. water


 



 



 

earth3rd's picture

Ciabatta - No Knead Bread

February 15, 2011 - 9:03am -- earth3rd

I found this recipe for Ciabatta No Knead Bread on the internet at this site: 


http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-Make-No-Knead-Ciabatta-Bread-213126958


Watch the video... I followed every step as seen in the video.


I converted the recipe to weight measurment... here it is...


     Ciabatta -no knead bread 1 loaf


455 gr APF (all purpose flour)

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I've been wanting to make this Hamelman bread for a while. I was hoping that the wheat germ would bring nutty wholesome flavors and the oil would soften the crust some.


I wasn't disappointed by the results, except for the crumb. I was careful in my non handling of the dough and it looked good before baking but I must have man handled it when transferring and inverting the three loaves.


The flavor is good and it's going to make a good sandwich later tonight.


Eric



Moots's picture
Moots

I stumbled upon bwraith's 2007 blog entry on this sourdough ciabatta. It combines my two favorite breads in a way that enhances the best of both! I have learned so much from others on this forum and thought others might like to be reminded of this great bread.


sourdough ciabatta


 




The link to bwraith's formula is here.


I didn't change a thing, but the discussion that followed the original posting was very helpful in monitoring the process.


 


Cheers,


Tracy

RikkiMama's picture

SFBI No-knead, Hand-mixed Ciabatta

January 23, 2011 - 1:43pm -- RikkiMama

One of the breads that we learned to make in the SFBI Specialty Breads workshop was a no-knead, hand mixed ciabatta.  I've made ciabatta using other formulas but hadn't been quite happy with the flavor and oven spring.  I knew using a biga or poolish was the way to add more depth to the flavor.  And that the high hydration makes it virtually impossible to knead the dough by hand.  So when we made the no-knead hand-mixed ciabatta, I knew I had finally found my Holy Grail of ciabattas.

geraintbakesbread's picture
geraintbakesbread

I had a busy day in the kitchen yesterday: as well as the semolina w/fennel bread (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21639/semolina-bread-wsoaker-amp-fennel-seed) & a Christopomos for the BBA challenge I'm participating in at http://akuindeed.com/?page_id=3099, I had a go at the ciabatta with biga.

I used some Italian '00' flour that I haven't used before:



Protein content is 11%. Reading through other posts at http://mellowbakers.com/index.php?board=67.0 (again, after I'd baked!), it sounds like Hamelman's recipes are geared to stronger American flours. I might give this another go using Doves Farm Organic White (12.5% protein) for comparison (I realise it's not just protein levels that determine gluten quality).

I don't have a mixer so kneading higher hydration doughs can be a challenge. I often use Dan Lepard's no knead method, but wanted to get this done fairly quickly & also wanted to see how well I could manage by hand. I made use of a tip I've picked up along the way, i.e. starting off with less water until the gluten is fairly well developed, then gradually adding the rest. I began by mixing the dough at 65% hydration; this was still very wet, so I used the French method of kneading that I'm sure many of you are familiar with (if not, video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvdtUR-XTG0).


I did this for about 15mins before incorporating the biga, and 10mins later, the rest of the water, which took a further 10.

I performed the folds at 1 & 2hrs, & scaled at 3x500g after 3hrs and left them to proove on floured boards. I somehow missed the bit saying: cover with linen & then plastic, and just used plastic, which was a bit sticky when it came to uncovering them 2hrs later!

Then came the bit which confuses me slightly: Hamelman writes about how fragile they are & not to sneeze near them & yet you're supposed to perform a flip?! Needless to say, they degassed considerably during this operation:



I don't know why I followed this procedure with all three; I wish now I'd baked one without flipping to see how it differed.They all baked well, one after the other, with almost no discernible difference in final appearance, in spite of the fact the last one went in an hour and a half after the first.



I was really pleased with the crust, but a little disappointed with the hole size/distribution. It was good to eat though: I ate half a loaf straight away!



More images at http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgratch13/sets/72157625835166834/

Shutzie27's picture
Shutzie27

1:52 p.m.:

Well, the dough has risen once and, as instructed, I have shaped it into two "irregular ovals," or at least what I hope are irregular ovals. Now they are sitting atop parchment paper, hopefully doubling in size again, waiting to be transferred to my pizza stone on the bottom of rack of the oven, which I will turn on to pre-heat in about 10 minutes. Here they were, just before I covered them:

So, there they are. I've never baked bread on parchment before, so here's hoping I can slide these on to the stone and not ruin the shape.

Niggling worries: The dough did have some bubbles, but I don't know that I would call it "bubbly." It is elastic, certainly, but awfully sticky. Since the recipe says the dough will be sticky, I suppose this is alright, but I am a bit worried. Ok, time will tell.....literally.....

Update to follow!

 

 

 

 

 



OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

On Friday night I baked the ciabatta from Rose Levy Beranbaums's The Bread Bible (TBB).  On Saturday I decided to try Peter Reinhart's recipe from Bread Baker's Apprentice (BBA) for comparison.  I am glad I did.  My results were success-failures.  I failed to properly shape the loaves from TBB, and as a result I ended up with broad, flat, spreading loaves with little or no loft/spring.  As a consequence of that I nearly over-baked them, although by appearance you would not think so.  I should have pushed the hydration more in the BBA loaves, because they ended up a bit "bready".  Here are my results.


First, Friday night from The Bread Bible:


 



 



As you can see, there was little true "spring" in these loaves, but the crust came out thin and crisp as it should, and the crumb is filled with holes both big and small.  I especially like the gelatinization of the starches that is evident here.  This bread is not perfect, but it is good to both the eye and the palate.  We have been slicing it big, then splitting it crosswise, and making very tasty sandwiches from this.


After these results I decided to try a comparison to broaden my experience, so I let Peter Reinhart challenge me.  Saturday night I baked the ciabatta from the BBA.  I have a couple more pictures from that bake than I do of the TBB bake above.



The shot above attests to how wet this dough was, although after the bake I concluded it needs to be wetter still.  Below are the (very) rustic loaves proofed, loaded on my "Super Peel" and ready for loading into the oven.



I baked these on my unglazed quarry tiles, as exactly according to direction as possible, even spraying the oven repeatedly during the early 90 seconds of the bake.



These loaves were not shaped perfectly, but they live up to "rustic" in character.



The folds are quite evident in my loaves, not that I think that is a bad thing.  It adds to the rustic character, and does not detract from the taste at all in my opinion.  The overabundance of flour, however, is another thing entirely, as the next shot shows.



This dough needed to be wetter, and the crumb attests to this.  The directions specify a variable amount of water from 3 to 6 ounces.  I used most of the 6 ounces.  In a sidebar Mr. Reinhart advocates raising the hydration even more, so long as the dough will sustain the stretch and folds needed to develop the gluten.  My loaves indicate this is not only a good idea, but necessary to achieve truly good results.



This closeup of the crumb shows how truly "bready" the crumb turned out.  It very much needed more water/less flour.  In addition, the small white "scrolls" in the crumb disclose my excess in flouring the dough between stretch and folds, and in shaping.  I was a bit too enthusiastic in "generously" flouring the dough between operations.  Controling this, too, will help me improve next time.


These recipes are for the same bread, but as I turned them out they seem to be from different planets.  Despite the lack of loft in the RL version I think I did the bestjob of that bread.  I got a much more true result, albeit altitude challenged!  The BBA recipe bears repeating as well, because with still higher hydration, and more moderation in that "generosity" between operations it will, no doubt, turn out a beautiful loaf.  I much prefer the bBA approach to shaping, and I like the rustic nature of the loaves once they are baked.


Two pairs of slippers: Two different ciabattas.  Too much fun!
Thanks for stopping by.
OldWoodenSpoon


 


Footnote:  For those not aware:  ciabatta is Italian for "slipper" and the shape of this loaf is supposed to evoke the image of a slipper when done correctly.  Hence the name.

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