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alfanso's picture
alfanso

Well, now he’s done it.  I was fool enough to rise to the absurd challenge of dabrownman the other day.  He can be a bit like that mean childhood cousin from out of town who visits and convinces me to stick a fork into an electrical socket.  Well, I’m past that age, thankfully (I think), but I still fell for the old fork-in-the-socket routine.  Ouch!

The challenge was of the order of txfarmer’s 105% hydration Whole Wheat baguettes using a liquid rye levain.  I don’t know if txfarmer used freshly ground grain or not, and she also added 15% barley flour, neither of which I possess.  Ian (isand66) informed me recently that freshly ground whole grain flours are much thirstier than that packaged stuff that I use.  

I had some pretty good success with PiPs 102% whole wheat sesame seeded batard which I did an admirable job on recently, so I was feeling my oats.  I was up for roughing it.  And rough it was.  

  • Making the liquid rye levain was a dream compared to the remainder of the tasks laid out like little bear traps before me.
  • The overnight autolyse of ice water and whole wheat flour went off without a hitch, except for the decided goopiness of the mix.
  • The 2nd day was the mixing: almost pure soup.  French folds surprisingly went okay for maybe the first 20-30 folds, and then all heck broke loose.  I was trying to corral the droopy stew of a dough with each attempt at a fold.
  • I did 5 or 6 letter folds, and with each one, a ray of hope peeked through the dark clouds of this whole wheat soup.  The dough was rising and starting to tighten.
  • Into the refrigerator for a 2 hour retard.
  • Divide, pre-shape and shape.  A virtual laughathon.
  • With a stroke of near genius (or desperation) I placed the “shaped” baguettes on floured parchment paper which itself resided on the couche.  Cradling each baguette between channels of the couche supported parchment, the whole deal was covered and placed into the refrigerator for what became a ~28 hour retard.  There was no way these weren't going to otherwise be permanently attached to the couche.
  • I had a vague feeling of hope when the I scored the baguettes.  The parchment went directly into the oven as is.  
  • 12 minutes of steam, and then when I went to rotate the baguettes, I found that they had decided to take up permanent residence on the parchment – they were stuck.  And so I continued to bake them just that way.

As it turns out, I pulled them way too soon as the inside was still quite moist from all of that hydration about a half hour later.  Now, those of you who have seen my baguettes know that I can make some pretty good stock much of the time, but these were like little devils just waiting with their pitchforks poised just to give me a good comeuppance.  I want challenges that have a potential end game, not the relatively unattainable.  

I’ll never do that again!  Ridiculous.  And hey, dabrownman, don’t try that again, ya hear!!!

The best step in the process - the levain ready to go.

 

The parchment paper solution, and how they napped overnight...

Steam released, rotated and still holding tight to the parchment

Don't try this at home, kids

 

Some open crumb, but not really.  They could have used another 5 or more minutes to shed a lot more water.  These are quite heavy due to their water retention.

Oh well.  And just like the 102% hydration WW batards, the smell and flavor is a bit reminiscent of a cross between a farm and a health foods store  ;-) .  Time to get a new levain up to par and prepare to bake something that I can do! 

alan

 

isand66's picture
isand66

My Father-in-law is staying with us for a couple of weeks so my Wife made him some Sunday Gravy with meatballs, sausage, and pork and beef braciole.  So of course I needed to make a good dipping sauce bread to go with it.

I decided to make a version of a bread I modified from Peter Reinhart's Italian Bread from "The Bread Bakers Apprentice".  He uses a Biga in his formula but I used a AP levain at 66% in mine.  The starter is a pretty high percentage of the overall formal at 44% but in the end it all worked out great.

This is not a high hydration dough either, but the final result is a nice soft crumb with a slight sweet taste from the maple syrup with a chewy crust.  The crumb is moderate which is great for mopping up the home made tomato sauce.

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Formula

Italian Style Sourdough (weights)

Italian Style Sourdough (%)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

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Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours,  and  the water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces),  oil, maple syrup and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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crumb

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Cher504's picture
Cher504

Several weeks ago, I started a new rye sour - Lucy's way [http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43019/really-dark-old-school-sprouted-pumpernickel-–-memory-barbra]

This starter is so potent! Thanks DAB -  it's the gift that keeps on giving. Since using it for the dark pumpernickels, I've been on a rye kick - trying out all different kinds of rye breads. pastedGraphic.png

My usual pumpernickel raisin with chia seeds (thanks Mini)

This one uses a double stout beer in place of water

Swedish Limpa Rye

This is the Horst Bandel black pumpernickel from "Bread"

Spiced Rye from Dan Lepard. Clearly I need to do a better job of mixing the rye roux into the other flours here - but the taste is something special!

This is my favorite Korn Rye with 'everything' topping. 

Other rye breads on my short list: Mini's favorite 100% rye with chia and pine nuts; Apple Cider Sour Rye and Finnish Rye from Susan's wildyeast blog, and someday soon I want to tackle a Borodinsky rye. 

So far it's been a summer of rye heaven!

Cheers and happy baking,

Cherie

Anne-Marie B's picture
Anne-Marie B

I've had my eye on this one for a while and finally got round to it this weekend. A savoury loaf made with Spelt and Semolina. The sesame flavour is strong, but not overpowering. The dough was soft but after umpteen folds, I thought it looked strong enough. I let the boule rise overnight in the fridge again and it looked a bit flat by the morning. But once it was in the oven, it came into its own. It makes a great sandwich with smoked black forest ham and a sharp aged cheese.

The recipe stated coarse semolina, but I had only fine semolina on hand, so that is what I used. I also used whole spelt flour and did not grind the toasted sesame seeds too finely. If you find the flavour of the sesame oil too strong, just use a few drops instead of the 10 drops suggested. I also added a teaspoon of malt extract.

Recipe here:

http://frenchnyonya.blogspot.com.au/2012/05/sesamespelt-semolina-and-sourdough.html



TwoBreadedBoy's picture
TwoBreadedBoy

On my last day of high school, I decided to make each of my teachers a loaf of bread. One of my teachers was vegan and from Milwaukee. For him, I made this challah in which the liquid used is a lager and the eggs are replaced with avacado (and a tiny bit of lemon to prevent browning), giving the dough a unique green tinge.

I shaped the dough into a trefoil knot, which I was convinced would look cool. It didn't.

 Before baking, I glazed the dough with some molasses mixed with a tiny bit of water.

The bread was tasty, but a bit dense. I attribute this to the fact that eggs expand when cooked, while avacadoes do not. Perhaps this could be fixed with a bit of baking powder?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The No Muss Mo Fuss rye starter is getting up there in age.  This week it was stored 14 weeks and smelled very sour.  Lucy decided to try out some new things just for fun and because she is just that way.  There is nothing she hates more than doing the same thing over and over.  Once is enough for her most always and she has no fear.  She does seem to do a lot more different things than most that way.

 

Instead of our normal 3 stage build of 2.3.a d3 hours for the summer she decided to toss all the builds into one and just stir the mix at the 2 and 5 hour marks.  It didn’t seem to matter to the levain and it doubled 3 hours after the 2nd stirring.   Lucy wants to make a horror movie about a vigorous SD starter that takes over the world titled ‘The 2nd Stirring’ but that project is on hold for the moment mainly due to a lack of sanity and willingness to waste more time than usual.

 

The starter was fed the 25% extraction of the 4 sprouted whole grains that was 40% wheat, 40% Kamut, 10% rye and 10% spelt which is an unusual mix for us with equal amounts of the sprouted whole grains the norm.  Since there wasn’t any bread flour or un-sprouted whole grains in this mix, we decided o cut the hydration a bit to compensate. We were less than 79% and normally for dough that has 50% whole grains we would be around 82.5%.

 

We retard the built levain for 24 hours and, while it warmed up on the counter, we autolysed the dough flour and water for an hour with the salt sprinkled on top so we wouldn’t forget it.  You don’t have to autolyse AP flour or sprouted 75% extraction flour as long as whole grain flour so an hour seems enough. 

 

We did 3 sets of slap and folds of 30 slaps each and 2 sets of slap and folds of 4 slaps each.  All manipulations were done on 30 minute intervals except the last 2 which were done on 45 minute intervals.   This is new procedure that we have started to use for long bulk retarded dough – in this case 21 hours at 36 F.  The re-hydrated cranberries, with the juice squeezed out, and the pecan pieces were added on the 4 th set of slaps. 

 

The dough went into the fridge immediately after the 5th set of slap and folds with no counter bulk ferment.  Too hot here for a bulk ferment at 88 F.  The dough had easily doubled during the retard.   Once the dough came out of fridge we immediately pre-shaped it into a boule and let it on the counter for an hour to warm up.  The we shaped it into a squat oval, placed it in a rice floured basket  and let it proof for 45 minutes.

 

We upended the dough onto parchment on a peel, slashed it and placing it on the bottom stone covered with a MagnaWare turkey roaster bottom used as a cloche for 20 minutes of steam at 450 F.  Once the lid came off we turned the oven down to 425 F convection and let it brown up well over the next 12 minutes.

 

The bread sprang and bloomed well enough, but we will have to wait on the inside looks until lunch time.  The bread turned out soft and moist on the inside with no large holes. Still it was airy enough and the taste was complex, fruity and a bit nuts.  This makes for a fine SD bread that really doesn't need much else to make a hearty, healthy meal.  Today's lunch was just the perfect backdrop for this bread.  Yummy!

 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

%

 

14 Week Retarded Rye Starter

10

1.92%

 

25 % Extraction Sprouted 4 Grain

52

10.00%

 

Water

58

11.15%

 

Total

120

23.08%

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

25% Extraction Sprouted 4 Grain

57

10.96%

 

Water

63

12.12%

 

Levain Totals

120

23.08%

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

110.53%

 

 

Prefermented Flour

10.96%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Winco AP

260

50.00%

 

75% Extraction Sprouted 4 Grain

203

39.04%

 

Total Dough Flour

463

89.04%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.92%

 

Water

350

67.31%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

520

 

 

Water

401

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cranberries

80

15.38%

Dry Wt.

hopped Pecans

80

15.38%

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

78.94%

 

 

Total Weight

1,128

 

 

Whole Sprouted Grain

50.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouted 4 grain is 100 g each of Kamut and

 

 

red winter wheat and 25g each of rye and spelt

 

 

 

 

 

 

The single stage 25% extraction sprouted

 

 

levain was stirred at the 2 and 5 hour mark

 

 

 

 Lucy loves to sun herself in the 108 F heat but I love the monsoon sunsets

 

 

TwoBreadedBoy's picture
TwoBreadedBoy

I've lurked on this website for quite a while and decided it was probably time to get an account.

I had recently gotten ahold of something called matsoon, a culture similar to yogurt or kefir, but from Armenia. Being the sort of person I am, I was determined to bake something with it.

I figured this would be similar to baking with buttermilk or yogurt, so I looked for recipes utilizing those. I found this one and made some slight tweaks. I had plenty of time, so I combined half a teaspoon of instant yeast with my matsoon, some honey and a cup of whole wheat flour and let it sit for a couple of hours. I then added the other ingredients. Even though this wasn't a lean dough, I couldn't resist shaping it into baguettes: one into an epi and the other into a circle.

The epi turned out very large, so the only thing large enough to bake on was a baking tray. However, the other loaf fit into a clay drip tray I usually use for boules.

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

  I was in the mood for a nice pastrami on rye with melted cheese and a good sour pickle.  I was going to just make my Jewish deli rye formula, but I remembered I had not made a rye porridge bread bread yet, so why not combine the two and hope for the best!

I have to say the taste on this one is fantastic and it's one of those breads you can eat with nothing on it.  The high hydration and  porridge component made this breads crumb super moist.  I love the onion bits dispersed with the rolled oats, rye chops and cracked wheat.

The only issue I had with this bread was that it ended up a little flat with little oven spring.  The high % of rye in this one fermented real quick and I should have reduced the amount of time I left the dough out after bulk fermenting.  It was very difficult to shape and I made the mistake of not using a basket with a liner.  I managed to get some extra flour underneath the dough after I shaped and placed in the cane baskets but probably man-handled the dough a bit too much.  Next time I will use a lined basket(s) for sure or make batards and use my linen couche.

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Rye Porridge Bread (%)

Rye Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions

If you have a rye starter you can simply refresh and use the correct amount in the final mix.  If not, mix all the levain ingredients for Build 1 together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  One trick you can use to see if the starter is ready for build 2 is to sprinkle some rye flour on-top and when it cracks you are ready to go.  If you have a proofer you can cut down the time by setting it to 78 degrees.  It usually takes me about 3-4 hours using the proofer.

When you are ready for Build 2, mix in the remaining ingredients and hold back some of the rye flour and sprinkle it on top after mixing.  When you have a nice grouping of cracks on the top of your levain you are ready to mix the main dough.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4's of the water called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and 450 grams of the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  While the dough is resting stir in the onions with the remaining water.  If you use fresh onions you can simply add it to the dough when going to the final mix step.  When the dough is rested, add the levain, cooled porridge,  salt and water/onion mixture and mix on low for 6 minutes.     You should end up with a very sticky dough.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 1.5 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 30 minutes. Remove the dough and shape as desired. (Note: this is a very sticky dough, so use wet hands and your dough blade to help you shape the dough.  Do not deflate the dough and add a ton of flour or you will not be happy with the result).  I suggest using a basket with a liner floured with rice flour to prevent sticking.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

crumb

 

Anne-Marie B's picture
Anne-Marie B

Weekend brekky on the beach with a frothy coffee.

Notes and the recipe.

I found the recipe here - http://treatntrick.blogspot.com.au/2012/05/spiral-apple-bread.html

The things I have changed:
1.  I did not roll out the dough, it did not really work for me, so I kneaded the dough again and proceeded as follows:
Just rolled by hand into a short, fat sausage and cut of pieces that I rolled into smaller sausages. It was easier and quicker to make the roses like this.

2.  The recipe states that it made two 8-inch roses out of the dough. I did not get nearly enough dough for that. My two roses were much smaller, thinner and rather delicate, which required very careful handling. Next time I will make just one thicker rose and slice my apple pieces thicker, to make a bigger, thicker rose bread that may allow me to cut it into wedges. It is probably a matter of personal preference.

3.  Instead of just brushing melted butter over the roses, after baking and sprinkling it with sugar, I melted the butter, sugar and some cinnamon together and painted the mixture over the roses after taking them out of the oven.

alfanso's picture
alfanso

A break in the action.  I'd been so busy lately with my batard thing that I neglected the simple pleasures of rolling out a few baguettes.  So I took a time-out and decided to go back to the first (and easiest) of my baguettes formulae, the one that kicked off the whole thing for my attempts at achieving a good result - Bouabsa style baguettes.

As I had with my recent successes in batard bakes, I baked these directly out of the refrigerator.  The original formula calls for a bulk retard, then bench warm-up, divide, shape and final proof.  So I was rebelling against all of these steps as my overnight retard was with the already shaped baguettes, and no post-retard warmup.

From an external point of view, the crust is all that I would want it to be - well shaped and scored, baked dark and nice oven spring.  Internally, the crumb is tight!  Nothing like what I had experienced way back when the crumb just about exploded open.

So, quickly paring down the possibilities on why, it seems quite obvious that the lack of a final proof must be the culprit.  For the method that I've been playing with, refrigerator-proofed, insufficient bench bulk rise - 60 minutes with three letter folds, is a likely reason as to why they didn't achieve a better crumb.  

I will give these another go in a few days with a change to something or other - more likely than not I'll go for a more extended bulk rise to see how that experiment comes out.  The original 60 minutes was quite skimpy on the rise time, but for now I will remain stubbornly attached to a pre-shaped retard and direct-from-the-refrigerator bake. (It's that Janet's mother thing I'd mentioned a few months back - do something just a bit different to make it your own.)

Steam released and baguettes rotated.

For comparison here is a pic of the open crumb from an early successful Bouabsa bake in Dec, 2013:

Back to the drawing board...

alan

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