The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ciabatta

tinmanfrisbie's picture

Ciabatta not browning, help

September 9, 2010 - 3:33pm -- tinmanfrisbie

So I tried making some ciabatta bread from Peter Reinhart's The Breadmaker's Apprentice.  I had to change a few things but am unsure if these were things that ultimately affected the browning.  Considering it was my first artisan bread that I've tried, it tasted pretty good.  Listed below are some of the deviations I made:

1.  Used active dry yeast instead

2.  Did not have a vegetable oil spray on hand, so I used Pam to coat

3.  Had to use the bottom of a large jelly roll pan to cook the bread on instead of a stone

marlnock's picture

Just started baking and loving it!

September 7, 2010 - 8:56pm -- marlnock

Hi guys,

I'm so glad to have found such an informative, vibrant and very much alive forum like this. 

I'm a student from Adelaide, South Australia and i love to cook in my spare time.  Recently, being a typical student living on a typical student income, i have decided to start baking my own bread.  This is for two reasons, 1. because it's loads cheaper than buying it. and 2. I love the beautiful taste and texture of proper bread that is worthy of decent toppings and that just tastes good on its own.

jcorlando's picture

Rise time for a No-Knead Ciabatta

July 24, 2010 - 12:17pm -- jcorlando

Chefs,

I making a "No Knead Ciabatta" that calls for an 18 hour rise period.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?=?v=YX_612bmvQI

 

It's summer here and I keep my condo fairly warm, about 78F - 80F

I notice that after 18 hours it seems to have risen and then fallen in the bowl about 1/2 an inch.

Any thoughts on how long it too long to lt it rise?

Do I want it to rise to the point that it doesn't start to fall?

or should I let it rise in the fridge for a day or 2?

 

wally's picture
wally

With a new baking job I've been overwhelmed to the point of hardly having time to enjoy posts on TFL let alone contribute.  But as the 4th has approached I found a day off to recharge my batteries, revisit some breads I love to bake, and try an experiment in dinner rolls involving ciabatta dough.

First, revisiting old friends - in this case Hamelman's mixed starter pain au levain, and, fougasse. 

Over time I've found that the subtle flavors that are imparted by a mixed starter of my everyday levain and rye levain, combined with a small introduction of whole wheat flour to the final dough, make this pain au levain my go-to bread of choice.  There is noticeable sourness in the baked loaf, yet not so overwhelming that it obscures the other flavors imparted by the mixture of grains and starters.

   

(A little crackly crust for David S here)

.          

Plus, I have to admit, it's just plain fun to be able to use both starters simultaneously in constructing one dough.  Usually I find myself grabbing one or the other starters out of the fridge (now that it's unbearable summer here in D.C.) and staring somewhat ruefully at the one which goes unused.  So Hamelman's mixed starter sourdough not only satisfies my taste buds, but assuages any sense of guilt over favoring one levain over the other.

The fougasse I haven't baked in some time, but I had promised compatriots at my favorite pub that on Saturday I would appear with snacks in hand.  And what better way to share than with a niçoise olive and sea salt fougasse! 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    The beautiful leaf shape was shortly admired and much more rapidly dismantled by my fellow pub mates!  I've tried these with a variety of additions - roasted garlic, sun-dried tomatoes, and traditional anchovies.  In any incarnation, I find them quickly devoured.  And let's face it, they are a 'fun' bread because of their distinctive shape.

My third bake on Saturday was with a traditional ciabatta dough of 72% hydration.  But instead of creating the usual 1 lb. loaves I decided to cut the dough into 1.5 oz increments and bake dinner rolls with them - ciabattinis as I like to call them. 

The dough makes for a quick and easy dinner roll that can be bagged and frozen once cooled, ready to be pulled out and thawed as needed.  Most of my dinner rolls contain healthy doses of butter, so I find this very simple roll - just flour, water, salt and yeast - to be a nice change and a wonderful sop for any dish that contains oils or juices.

      

The other eventful recent occurrence was a delightful 2-day workshop at King Arthur Flour in mid-June on wood-fired oven baking, taught by Dan Wing who, with Alan Scott, wrote the 'bible' on wfo's - The Bread Builders.  It was an eye-opener for me in that my conceptions of wfo's as mainly pizza makers were thrown out the window as we not only baked wonderful breads, but cooked equally wonderful meals on them. Those who are interested in reading more about my second 'excellent adventure at KAF' can find my recounting here.

Happy baking and Happy 4th of July to all!

Larry

Blue Skies's picture

People asked, so here goes...

June 6, 2010 - 3:48pm -- Blue Skies

I posted over in the Artisan Bread discussion, and people asked that I post photos.  This seems to be the place for that.

These are photos of breads that I've made as well as a couple of photos of the results of a course I took from Carl Shavitz (namely Grissini and Bagels).  Enjoy (I certainly enjoyed eating them)...

3 Challah Buns

3 Challah Buns

zoltan szabo's picture
zoltan szabo

Good Afternoon everyone,

I would like to share a picture from my ciabatta i baked today afternoon.

I mixed up the dough in the morning around 11am ish. Normaly mix it the night before but this time i never had the time for it. Anyway. I placed the sticky dough into a well oiled shallow container and covered with cling film. Let it rise until 2pm ish. Then strech-fold it once and left it in the tub until 4pm. I switched on my oven for 190C to heat. I poured the dough onto a well floured table and then devided into two. Brushed with some olive oil, dusted with flour and let it rest for 30min. Than carefully I lifted onto a baking sheet and chucked into the oven. It was take abt 25min to bake them.

The colour was lovely golden, nice crispy crust and delicius crumb. Normaly the longer fermentation results with a more open-crumb structure but it was still lovely.

Ingredients: 260gr flour, 230gr water, 6gr dry yeast, 1 tbsp olive oil, 1 tbsp salt + extra flour for dusting, extra oil for brushing.  

I based my recipe on a similar recipe submitted by LilDice on May 10, 2007.     

Happy Baking,

    Zoltan

thehsmomof3's picture

Whole Wheat/ Whole Grain French Bread, Ciabatta, or similar bread

May 1, 2010 - 3:18pm -- thehsmomof3
Forums: 

I have been making 100% whole wheat bread (both with hard red and hard white wheat) for quite some time.  My family loves the loaves, and I love the ease of baking using my Bosch Universal.  (I have rheumatoid arthritis, and I'm unable to knead by hand.)  However, I want to branch out into French bread, Ciabatta, artisan bread or something smiilar.  Has anyone successfully made this type of bread 100% whole grain using a Bosch or similar machine?  Please share your recipes.  I would be most grateful.  Thank you, Sherri

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,

Just wanted to share with you my bake from last night.  Ciabatta blobs.  I was planning to bake something else, but switched plans last minute...  I'm happy with them.  They have the most open crumb that I have gotten in a long time...  Enjoy!

Recipe is below.

Tim

Recipe

1000g Bread Flour

200g Firm Sourdough Starter (60% hydration)

800g Water

24g Kosher Salt

6g Active Dry Yeast (approx 2 tsp)

2030g Total Dough Yield

 

Instructions:

7:00pm – Weigh out all ingredients.  Place firm SD starter along with water in large mixing bowl.  Then, add all dry ingredients on top, mix well with wooden spoon and plastic scraper.  Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.

7:30pm – In bowl, turn dough using wet hands and French fold method until dough is smooth.  4-8 strokes.  Cover and let rest.

8:00pm – Turn dough using French fold or letter fold method in bowl using wet hands, cover and let rest.

8:30pm – Turn dough using wet hands, cover and let rest.

9:00pm – Turn dough using wet hands, cover and let rest.

9:30pm – Turn dough using wet hands, cover and let rest.

9:45pm – Turn dough using wet hands, place on well floured linen couche on a sheet pan in 1 piece seam side down.  Flour top, cover, place in large plastic bag, proof for 1 hr.  Arrange 2 baking stones and a steam pan in oven, preheat to 550F with convection.

10:50pm – Using a bench scraper, cut dough blob into 4 roughly equal pieces, stretch them out lightly, place onto floured peel and place in oven directly on baking stone.  When all the loaves are in, pour 1 cup of water into steam pan, close oven door, turn down oven to 450F, no convection, bake for 40 minutes, rotating them between the stones halfway through the bake.  Cool completely before cutting.

 

CosmicChuck's picture
CosmicChuck

This is a project I have been working on and haven't fully perfected yet, but I think I am getting there. I am using King Arthur Whole Wheat flour and my four year old Carl Griffith's starter that I have bult into a whole wheat starter. The dough is at 76% hydration and involves a lengthy cold delayed ferment. Still feels a bit heavy for a ciabatta, but I think I may get it in a couple more tries.

And sorry for the bad pictures. I am currently shopping for a better camera.

Crumb

 

Crust

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Every end of the week,  I'm so looking forward to my baking.  I think it has become an obsession.
Baguette on Friday night, with my old dough from the 5 minutes fresh baked bread.  I forgot to add yeast and salt to the dough, but it worked as well, as I had put aside for slow retard rise.  
I think at least I got the scoring right this time.  Better than most other times. Click here for details.






Ciabatta on Saturday morning.
Woke up this morning, thinking about my Ciabatta dough waiting for me.  I was excited to see how it turns out.  Lovely crumbs,  soft on the inside,  crispy on the outside.  Click here to see details.



Well,  I'm going to make chicken sandwich for lunch this afternoon.
Jenny www.foodforthoughts.jlohcook.com
 

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