The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Recent Blog Entries

texasbakerdad's picture
texasbakerdad

These are the results of my first attempt. See the (1-recipe) blog post to see what the plan was.

Recap:

The wife has tasked me to come up with a sandwich bread recipe our family can bake at least once a weak to completely replace our regularly purchased box store sandwich bread.

This post is for the recipe for my second attempt to make the perfect loaf.

Requirements

  • Soft and light
  • 100% whole wheat
  • Recipe must be easily repeatable and easy to execute.
  • Recipe must be designed for a covered pullman loaf pan.
    (https://shop.kingarthurbaking.com/items/pain-de-mie-pan-pullman-loaf-pan-13)
  • My 12 year old daughter must be able to bake the bread from start to finish
  • Sourdough leavening only.
  • From start to finish, the bread must be completable in 1 day.
  • Process must exist to enable the baker to know with reasonable certainty that the loaf is perfectly proofed.
  • Dough needs to contain a few softened chewy seeds, grain berries, etc. for texture and flavor.

Summary of Results

The Good:

  • The bread tasted amazing and was quite sour. After toasting the bread and adding a bit of butter, I think this might have been the best sour tasting bread I have ever eaten.
  • Including the oven bloom, I'd guess the there was a total volume gain of 3x-4x.
  • The crust was nice and soft.

The Bad:

  • The bread was too sour for an everyday sandwich loaf. My sourdough starter isn't typically this sour, the increased sourness was most definitely the result of the long long rise time (20 hours at an average of 76dF). This should be easy to fix by taking steps to significantly increase the rise rate. I took those steps in (2-recipe).
  • The cooked bread was too heavy (by weight, not by texture/taste/fullfilligness). Me thinks this is due to too much water being retained in the dough after the bake and if I were to have cooked the dough significantly longer, the loaf would have been lighter.
  • The bread was undercooked, there was dense very slightly uncooked dough at the very bottom of the loaf. I will increase the bake time from 45 min to 1 hour to hopefully remedy this problem.
  • The bread broke too easily when being handled. I think this too is due to the bread being undercooked.

The Final Recipe:

  • 30g (6%) sourdough starter (50:50 hard red)
  • 50g rolled outs
  • 30g (6%) honey
  • 12g (2%ish) non-iodized salt (Accidentally added to much salt)
  • 30g (6%) virgin olive oil
  • 450g (90% if you include rolled oats) well water
  • 60g home milled hard white wheat (sifted to remove bran)
  • 390g home milled hard red wheat (sifted to remove bran) (I ran out of hard white, had to use hard red for the rest)
  • sifted bran to be used as topping

The Bake:

  • 2:00p: mixed 450g boiling water (all of the water), honey, oats, and salt until evenly combined. let it sit for 10 min to soften the oats.
  • 2:10p: mixed in olive oil.
  • 2:11p: added all flour, used ankersum to mix long enough to make shaggy mess.
  • 2:21p: smeared 30g of starter over the top of the dough mixture, then used ankersum to knead using dough hook for 5 minutes.
  • 2:26p: transferred as much dough as possible to clean bowl and covered. Took 20g of dough and put into aliquot.
  • 2:30p, 5:30p, 9:30p: Stretch and fold, the entire time, there was no sign of sourdough activity.
  • 11:00p: first obvious signs of sourdough activity in the aliquot, no visible increase in dough bulk.
  • 7:00a: Dough in aliquot had risen 2.5x. Preheated the oven to 375dF. Turned dough out onto counter and preshaped into ball.
  • 7:00a: Prepped pullman pan, brushed butter on all sides of pan, sprinkled bran flakes on butter.
  • 7:10a: Shaped loaf into log and put in pan and covered.
  • 7:40a: Brushed top of loaf with melted butter, sprinkled bran flakes on top, and scored. Loaded loaf into oven and baked for 45 min covered (note: I have misplaced my pullman loaf lid, I used an inverted cookie sheet to get by, the cookie sheet was in the warming oven, so it was already hot.)
  • 8:25a: Put dough on a rack to cool. Took about 1.5 hours to cool.
  • 10a: Sliced dough and enjoyed!

Side Note: As I type (it is currently 11:55a) the dough in the aliquot is STILL RISING! See photos.

I took the photo above before I brushed with butter, added bran flakes to the top, and scored.

You can see in the photo above the dense crumb at the bottom of the loaf. I assume this is the pure result of being slightly undercooked and the weight of the dough pushing down on itself after I took it out of the oven and set it on the rack to cool.

On the left is the aliquot for today and represents the level that the aliquot on the right was at originally. This photo was taken at 11:20a on bake day. So, that would be 21 hours AFTER kneading the starter into the dough.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Nov. 29, 2020.

This is my third attempt at the "Adventure Bread" from the Josey Baker Bread book. But, this is my first attempt to make it exactly as written. Previously, I swapped out the psyllium husk for other binders, but I never matched the absorbancy of psyllium, so it was overly wet, and the oats totally dissolved.  (IE., I violated my own rule of not making substitutions until after you make something at least once, so that you know what it is supposed to look like. Once you know what it is supposed to look like, then have fun with it.)

A similar public recipe is here: https://liezljayne.com/overnight-oat-nut-seed-bread-gluten-free/

 

You can see how the psyllium really bulks up.
Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

I bought a bag of semola rimacinata a few weeks ago, and finally decided to try it. Found the recipe here, and basically followed it, except increased the hydration to 70% (and even that maybe was a bit low, I feel the flour could have taken more): http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14268/pane-con-semola-rimacinata-di-grano-duro

Here is my formula: https://fgbc.dk/123b

Mixed the levain overnight, it really quite cold here, so it didn't quite double until I placed it on the radiator in the morning, where it quickly jumped up.

Then used warm water, did some slap&folds to start gluten development from the beginning, and roughly followed the timings in the writeup above. Stopped bulk when the dough was jiggly and I could clearly see bubbles through the walls of the plastic bowl. I was originally going to retard shaped loaves overnight and bake in the morning, but had a change of plans that I was meeting friends fur brunch, and wanted to bring one of the breads to them, so had to proof in the evening and bake same day. And I of course coated them in sesame seeds!

The oven spring was, like in my last bake, OK, but not spectacular. Love the colour of the crust and crumb. I am not sure whether the oven spring would have been smaller if I fermented more, and it doesn't seem underproofed to me, but I think the taste could be more pronounced.


texasbakerdad's picture
texasbakerdad

Recap:

The wife has tasked me to come up with a sandwich bread recipe our family can bake at least once a weak to completely replace our regularly purchased box store sandwich bread.

This post is for the recipe for my second attempt to make the perfect loaf.

Requirements

  • Soft and light
  • 100% whole wheat
  • Recipe must be easily repeatable and easy to execute.
  • Recipe must be designed for a covered pullman loaf pan.
    (https://shop.kingarthurbaking.com/items/pain-de-mie-pan-pullman-loaf-pan-13)
  • My 12 year old daughter must be able to bake the bread from start to finish
  • Sourdough leavening only.
  • From start to finish, the bread must be completable in 1 day.
  • Process must exist to enable the baker to know with reasonable certainty that the loaf is perfectly proofed.
  • Dough needs to contain a few softened chewy seeds, grain berries, etc. for texture and flavor.

Modifications from Previous Bake

The last bake's rise took too long (20 hours). I need to get that down to something less than 10 hours. I am going to double my starter from 6% to 12%. And, I am going to make sure I use my starter at a more optimal time (in the morning or evening, versus what I did last bake which was to use it at 2pm). My guess is the rise will get end up somewhere between 4 and 8 hours depending on the temperature.

Last bake's dough was too dry for my liking. I am going to increase the hydration just a little bit, I want to increase it more, but I don't want to change too much too fast, especially since I am also doubling my starter. Old hydration 90% of wheat and oats (not including 50:50 starter), new hydration, 95% of wheat and oats (not including 50:50 starter).

5 minute knead using my ankersum with the dough hook attachment was not long enough, last bake I ended up doing a 10 minute mix. I updated my process to reflect that change.

I originally stated 50g of dough for the aliquot jar, but 20g is what I ended up using and was the perfect amount for the size jar I am using. I updated the recipe to reflect this fact.

The bread was slightly undercooked, increasing the bake time from 45min to 1hour.

FYI: My loaf size, about 1kg is a bit small for my huge pullman pans, I am OK with this for now, because I think a 1.5kg loaf is closer to the right size for these 14" pullmans. But, since I am experimenting at this point, I don't want to be making loafs that big just yet. I am fine with undersized loaves temporarily while I work out perfecting my rise. I think that I will leave honing in on the perfect loaf size for the pan as one of the last steps of my experimentation.

Second Attempt

Ingredients

  • 60g (12%) sourdough starter (50:50 hard red)
  • 50g rolled outs
  • 30g (6%) honey
  • 10g (2%) non-iodized salt
  • 30g (6%) virgin olive oil
  • 475g (95% if you include rolled oats) well water
  • 450g hard white wheat (sifted to remove bran)
  • sifted bran to be used as topping

Process

  • 0:00: In large mixing bowl, add: 475g of boiling water, 50g rolled oats, 30g honey, 10g salt. Mix and let sit for 10 minutes.
  • 0:10: Mix in 30g olive oil
  • 0:11: Without kneading, mix the 450g of hard white wheat to combine into a shaggy mess. Let autolyze for 10 minutes
  • 0:21: Smear 60g starter over the top of the dough mess. Use mixer or hand to knead at medium speed for 10 minutes.
  • 0:26: Transfer dough to proofing container with lid. Siphon off 20g of dough to aliquot jar.
  • Estimate a 2 hour rise time, but will move to next step when aliquot jar shows 2x rise.
  • 2:26: Preshape dough into ball, let sit for 10 min.
  • 2:36: Shape dough into log and place into prepared pullpan pan, cover with plastic wrap.
  • Estimate a 1.5 hour rise time, but will move to next step when aliquot jar shows 3.5x rise.
  • 3:36: Preheat oven 375dF
  • 4:06: Assuming aliquot jar shows 3.5x rise, sprinkle bran on top of loaf, put lid on pullman and stick in oven for 1 hour.
  • 4:56: Pull from oven, transfer loaf to rack. Let rest until cool, probably 1 hour.
  • 5:56: Slice using slicer then put loaf in plastic bread bag to keep it soft.
Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

 

 

I was looking for inspiration and came acrossAnthony Power’s Irish Stout, Oats and Cheddar Sourdough. Here is my version.

 

Soaker

175 g rolled oats

185 g Sleeping Giant Brewery Skull Rock Stout

 

Dough

800 g Strong Baker’s Unbleached flour

150 g freshly milled Selkirk flour

50 g freshly milled rye flour

540 g filtered water + 25 g

110 g Sleeping Giant Brewery Skull Rock Stout

24 g salt

30 g local yogurt

125 g old white cheddar, finely cubed

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

 

 

Two mornings before:

1. Take 18 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 18 g of filtered water and 18 g of wholegrain flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

1. Feed the levain 36 g of water and 36 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

1. Feed the levain 72 g of filtered water and 72 g of strong baker’s flour and let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

1. Mill the Selkirk and Rye berries if needed. If buying flour, get the freshest that you can and ensure that it is wholegrain. 

2. Place the required amounts of the wholegrain flours in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 

3. Cover and set aside.

4. Combine the soaker ingredients together in a heat proof bowl and cover. Let soak, covered, overnight in the fridge.

5. Cut up the cheese in small cubes and toss in flour to keep separated. Refrigerate. 

 

Dough making day:

1. In the morning, take the levain out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough.

2. Using a stand mixer, add the water and stout with the flours to the bowl, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours. 

3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 7 more minutes.  

4. Add the soaker, the extra water, and the cubed cheddar to the mixing bowl. Mix on speed 2 until it is evenly distributed. This takes two or three minutes.

5. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 

6. Do 2 sets of coil folds at 30 minute intervals and then more 2 sets at 45 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 40%. At about 30%, I tipped out the dough to shape it and it felt rather heavy. I put it back into the tub to bulk for another half hour. It still felt rather solid but not quite as heavy. The amount of add-ins do not make for a light jiggly dough. 

7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~840g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 

8. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.

9. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Sprinkle oat flakes on top of the flour mix, then place the dough seam side down. (As you can see, I forgot to do this). Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

 

Baking Day

1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

 

I am very glad I used parchment paper on the bottom of the pots. All the loaves stuck in one or more spots to the sides of the pot. I used a flexible bread knife to release the loaves in those spots. Do not bake these without parchment paper unless you want to be eating this bread right out of the pot. 🤣

gavinc's picture
gavinc

This last weekend I did a test run of a 3-stage fermentation rye sourdough. I know a little about how rye behaves, so I thought “What could go wrong?”. I chose Hamelman’s Three Stage 70 Percent Sourdough Rye. I recalculated for a 750-gram boule.

The first issue was that the recipe called for medium rye flour. I only have home-milled whole rye. Lance advised getting a 40# mesh to get something close to medium rye. I was keen to proceed anyway and went ahead using whole rye.

The 3-stage process requires various temperatures at each stage. My homemade proofer is quite hard to change the temperature, so I finished up using a 25C fermentation for stages 1 and 2. I used the inbuilt oven proof function for stage 3, which was slightly higher than the 29C required. The final proof was completed in 25C instead of 29C. While all this was happening, I read about the Brod and Taylor proofer some of you guys use. It would have taken all the anxiety away.

I was happy with the result. The baked loaf has a few cracks (apparently good) and had a good sound when I tapped the bottom of the baked loaf. I am now waiting for 24 hours for the crumb to stabilise. I will add a crumb picture tomorrow.

Action items:

Order 40# mesh – done.

Order Brod & Taylor proofer – done.

I am looking forward to repeating this after I get my new gear.

texasbakerdad's picture
texasbakerdad

The wife has tasked me to come up with a sandwich bread recipe our family can bake at least once a weak to completely replace our regularly purchased box store sandwich bread.

Requirements

  • Soft and light
  • 100% whole wheat
  • Recipe must be easily repeatable and easy to execute.
  • Recipe must be designed for a covered pullman loaf pan.
    (https://shop.kingarthurbaking.com/items/pain-de-mie-pan-pullman-loaf-pan-13)
  • My 12 year old daughter must be able to bake the bread from start to finish
  • Sourdough leavening only.
  • From start to finish, the bread must be completable in 1 day.
  • Process must exist to enable the baker to know with reasonable certainty that the loaf is perfectly proofed.
  • Dough needs to contain a few softened chewy seeds, grain berries, etc. for texture and flavor. 

Plan

I am going to start with a txfarmer's recipe (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21575/sourdough-100-whole-wheat-oatmeal-sandwich-bread-whole-grain-breads-can-be-soft-too) and modify from there. I imagine it is going to take me somewhere between 5 to 10 bake days to hammer out the base recipe. To help perfect the proofing, I am going to use an aliquot jar.

At first, I am going to leave out any interesting seeds, nuts, and berries until the base recipe is sorted out.

My goal at first will be to get an optimal texture, hydration level, and rise.

To keep the process as simple as possible, I am going to at least at first, try to get away without any folding of the dough during the bulk rise.

First Attempt

Ingredients

  • 30g (6%) sourdough starter (50:50 hard red)
  • 50g rolled outs
  • 30g (6%) honey
  • 10g (2%) non-iodized salt
  • 30g (6%) virgin olive oil
  • 450g (90% if you include rolled oats) well water
  • 450g hard white wheat (sifted to remove bran)
  • sifted bran to be used as topping

Process

  • 0:00: In large mixing bowl, add: 450g of boiling water, 50g rolled oats, 30g honey, 10g salt. Mix and let sit for 10 minutes.
  • 0:10: Mix in 30g olive oil
  • 0:11: Without kneading, mix the 450g of hard white wheat to combine into a shaggy mess. Let autolyze for 10 minutes
  • 0:21: Smear 30g starter over the top of the dough mess. Use mixer or hand to knead at medium speed for 5 minutes.
  • 0:26: Transfer dough to proofing container with lid. Siphon off 50g of dough to aliquot jar.
  • Estimate a 2 hour rise time, but will move to next step when aliquot jar shows 2x rise.
  • 2:26: Preshape dough into ball, let sit for 10 min.
  • 2:36: Shape dough into log and place into prepared pullpan pan, cover with plastic wrap.
  • Estimate a 1.5 hour rise time, but will move to next step when aliquot jar shows 3.5x rise.
  • 3:36: Preheat oven 375dF
  • 4:06: Assuming aliquot jar shows 3.5x rise, sprinkle bran on top of loaf, put lid on pullman and stick in oven for 45 minutes.
  • 4:56: Pull from oven, transfer loaf to rack. Let rest until cool, probably 1 hour.
  • 5:56: Slice using slicer then put loaf in plastic bread bag to keep it soft.

I am going to get my butt off the couch and try this out. I hope it all goes well.

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

After an absence from bread baking I often come back to this bread to get myself back in the groove. It's Sara Owens' Honeyed Oat Spelt Sourdough bread. This picture is right after taking the lid off the combo cooker.

 

loydb's picture
loydb

After a brief dalliance with PR's whole wheat sandwich bread, I'm back to my traditional sourdough loaf (starter + water + flour + salt). These were around 80% hydration.The sandwich bread was delicious, but didn't keep nearly as well as the traditional loaf.

 

 

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

I'm getting back into baking after a busy summer.

I made this tonight and continue to be a fan of Sara Owens' recipes. Everything I've made from her books I've really enjoyed. This cake has only 30 grams of brown sugar and only uses whole wheat flour. It has five ripe bananas in it - which are placed in the oven with the brown sugar and a bit of rum to roast for 15 minutes before you make the batter. It uses ripe starter but I don't even think it's necessary given baking powder and soda powder are used in the recipe.

I literally took it out of the oven about half an hour ago and we couldn't resist so some is missing from the pic below!   Her recipe calls for a ganache to accompany it but we used Nutella instead! :)  I'll definitely be making this again! It's so good!

 

Pages

Subscribe to Recent Blog Entries