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loydb's picture
loydb

I've been baking yeasted breads while I rebuilt a starter. Yesterday was the first bake with it, and I'm pleased.

The recipe is the San Francisco sourdough from BBA. I milled 5% rye and 95% hard white wheat.

I did stretch and folds every 20 minutes for the first two hours, then left it alone for three hours. Shaped and put into a banneton, then into the fridge to proof for two hours.

It's very lightly sour, which I expect from a new starter. I'll see how it develops over the next month before making a decision to keep or not.


WatertownNewbie's picture
WatertownNewbie

After reading about this recipe, I decided to go for it, especially because I had never tried a 100% spelt loaf before and I like black treacle.  For the initial mixing I included sixty-five slap-and-folds because the dough felt reasonably strong, and that seemed to be fine.  Although I did try the letter fold technique for the first S&F, the dough stuck to my counter a lot, and I opted to leave the dough in my 6-quart Cambro tub for the second S&F and did the usual reach-under-and-lift-up.

The bulk fermentation took about an hour, but the final proofing accelerated, and I left the dough in bannetons for only 38 minutes (rather than the suggested 50 minutes from the recipe).  I shaped a boule for the Dutch oven and a batard for my baking stone.  The lid stayed on the Dutch oven for the first 20 minutes, and total time for that loaf was 39 minutes.  For the baking stone I opened the oven door after twelve minutes to vent steam and flipped the loaf around at the twenty minute mark.  Total time for the batard was 37 minutes.

The crust is crisp, and the crumb has a nice subtle but observable flavor supplied by the black treacle.  I suspect that this bread will toast very nicely too.  Scoring was difficult in that the dough is very soft and puffy, and the oven spring from spelt is not what you get from bread flour or all-purpose, but this was a fun bread to make.  In addition, because this bread uses only instant yeast and no preferment, I started at 9:00 am and removed the loaves slightly before 2:00 pm.

Here are the two loaves (photos spliced).

Here is the crumb from the batard.

Carb Addict's picture
Carb Addict

I have a simple question. Why is it that we are supposed to put the shaped loaf into the banaton with the seam side UP? It seems counterintuitive to me, since the tension is on the TOP of the loaf; not on the bottom. Yet, my bread does turn out pretty good most of the time.

I don't have a round banaton. When I make boules (rarely these days), I never do that. I just put the dough on parchment and place with the top UP in a glass bowl, not with the seam up.

BTW, I bake sourdough. My starter, which I have had for about 3 years now, is very active. Even if I have not baked for several months all I need to do is feed it a couple of times over 24 hours and BOOM.

ninarosner's picture
ninarosner

I replicated the method of Loaf 11 because of good result. Fewer S&Fs. 

RECIPE

100% (500g) wholewheat stoneground flour (12.7g protein per 100g)
15% (75g) starter
85% (425g) hydration
2% (10g) salt

METHOD

1 day before, I discarded most of the starter leaving only about 2 tbsp. Refreshed this with 50g water and 50g WW flour.

12.00: AL flour and water
13.00: Mixed in starter and salt, kneaded lightly on countertop, left to sit. *then went out for a walk so couldn't do S&Fs till later*
16.30: S&F
17.30: S&F
18.30: S&F
22:30: Shape into boule, and placed seam side up in floured tea-towel, in colander. Into fridge to proof overnight
09.45 next day: Out of fridge, oven on to warm up
10:45: Into dutch oven, score, and into oven at ~230c
11.05: Lid off
11.35: Out of oven to cool.

RESULT

Good! The thing which is letting me down most right now is my dutch oven. It's too small for my breads, so they get squashed in there. Meaning (I think) they don't rise and open as much as they would like to. I'm keen to experiment without dutch oven and with steam method instead... though I don't have a baking stone.

 

SeasideJess's picture
SeasideJess

Since folks have been sharing their simple whole wheat loaves, I thought I should share this. It's a very easy, straightforward bake and makes an absolutely delicious, moist and flavorful loaf of bread.  It's adapted from  Patrick Ryan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3qDLrpQh10I corrected the salt and added a pseudo autolyse (with yeast but no salt.)The hydration is 73% and is really perfect.This recipe produces two 600 gram loaves.

  •  
Ingredients:
  • 700g wholemeal spelt flour
  • 510ml water
  • 35g black treacle (or honey, molasses, or barley malt syrup, which is what I used)
  • 20g salt
  • 7g dry yeast

2 x 400g (1lb) loaf tins or 20cm (8inch) proving baskets

  Method:
  1. Mix together the molasses/black treacle/barley malt syrup and the water.
  2. Add the water mix to the spelt flour. Sprinkle the yeast over the water. Use a dough whisk to just combine. Let sit for 1 hour to hydrate the gluten and bran.
  3. Spread the dough out on a counter and add the salt. Roll the dough up, fold it over, and knead for about three minutes, until the salt is mixed in. The gluten is already developed by the rest, so it doesn't need much kneading. The dough will be very springy, cohesive, and tacky, and will show windowpane after a brief rest.
  4. Place the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover and let it rest for 20-30 mins at room temperature.
  5. After 30 minutes turn the dough out onto a clean work surface and stretch the dough out like a sheet, and give it a letter fold. This helps to build strength within the dough. Fold the dough in thirds from one side and then the other, then roll it up from top to bottom. Return the dough to the bowl, seam side down. Cover and leave to rest for another 20-30 minutes.
  6. Again, turn the dough out onto a clean work surface then stretch the dough out and give it another letter fold. Return to the bowl and for a further 60 minutes until fully proofed.
  7. Turn out the dough on to a clean kitchen surface and do a gentle letter fold to knock back. Don't stretch it as much as before: allow it to keep some thickness and air. Pop any large bubbles. Divide the dough into two then shape each piece of dough into a rough round shape.
  8. If making a round loaf, tighten the round. (You can watch how to shape the dough in the video). Place the shaped dough upside down into a floured proving basket, seam side facing up, or alternatively in a bowl lined with a lightly floured tea towel
  9. Alternatively, the dough can be shaped and placed into a bread tin. (You can watch how to shape the dough in the video). Once the dough has been shaped, place it in a buttered floured loaf tin.
  10. Leave the dough to prove at room temperature for about 50 minutes. While it's proving, pre-heat the oven to 230°C/425°F and get your steaming setup ready, if desired.  Turn the dough out of the basket onto a baking tray and score the top of the loaf with a sharp knife or baker’s razor blade. Or if using a bread tin, dust the surface of the dough with some wholemeal spelt flour before placing into the oven.
  11. Place the loaves in the oven. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until a good crust has formed and the loaves sound hollow when tapped on the base.

Here's a picture of the dough after the first letter fold. 

Dough after letter fold

yozzause's picture
yozzause

I managed to bottle 30 bottles of Australian Ale just the other day from my home brew and also kept the dregs from the bottom of the fermenter. I decided to use some of that today to raise my dough, often referred to as a Beer Barm. I quickly worked out a dough formula and was going to make a 1KG dough but then decided that a single 750g loaf would be the go. i shook the bottle up that contained the Barm and weighed off an equal amount of flour and barm combined the two and set aside, i marked the container so that we could see its progress and its time frame. In just over two hours it was crowning and set to be used. i weighed up the rest of the ingredients and made the dough which was finished at 7.00 not sure how long the bulk fermentation will take shall have to play it by ear. More to follow tomorrow as i am off to bed

Flour 420g : Salt 9g : Malt extract 9g : Butter 9g : Beer Barm 104g : Water 233g.

After heading for bed and placing the dough into the fridge at 9.00 last night i retrieved it at 5 this morning and at 7.00 it was knocked back given recovery time and shaped at 7.30. The shape is a new one that i haven't done before and quite pleased with the result. you roll out 6 strands of dough lay 3 down in the horizontal plane and three in the vertical plane over lapping alternatively in the middle, from there you proceed to plait three strands together away from the centre which produces a star effect, you then roll these arms under the loaf to make a ball. Voila! Cutting and tasting still to come, and if the taste testing proves to be ok and anyone wants to try using the Australian Ale Barm i'd be happy to make some available to you to try ( Perth Western Australia). Mean while i have some of the ferment that i fed on with more w/m that looks like it needs to be used or fed again pretty much like you do with a sour dough, except that it's not a sourdough its just propagation of the yeasts that were used in the brewing process Saccharomyces cerevisiae

 

FOOTNOTE With many people suffering shortages of yeast this may be the way to go!

And the taste was very good too, I will be trying it again with extra feed of flour thrown in to the equation.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Yes. It's cheese bread again. You can't have too much of it, can you? :)

 

 

Taleggio Hazelnut SD with Einkorn, Red Fife & Sprouted Red Rice

 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

263

100

37

100

303

100

Whole Einkorn Flour

120

40

    

120

39.60

Sprouted Red rice Flour

90

30

    

90

29.70

Whole Red Fife Wheat Flour

90

30

    

90

29.70

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

      

3

0.99

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

      

3

0.99

         

Hydration

    

40

100

243

80.20

Water

  

203

77.19

37

100

243

80.20

         

Salt

4

1.33

5

1.90

  

5

1.65

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.85

  

7.5

2.48

Starter (100% Hydration)

    

6

16.22

  

Levain

  

80

30.42

    
         

Add-ins

66

22.00

66

25.10

  

66

21.78

Taleggio AOP, Diced

66

22.00

66

25.10

  

66

21.78

Roasted Hazelnuts, Halved

15

5.00

15

5.70

  

15

4.95

         

Total

  

624.5

237.45

80

216.22

624.5

206.11

 

 

Blue Stilton Sultanas Rosemary SD with Einkorn & Sprouted Kamut 

 

 

Dough flour

Final Dough

Levain

Total Dough

 

g

%

g

%

g

%

g

%

Flour (All Freshly Milled)

300

100

261

100

39

100

302

100

Sprouted Kamut Flour

150

50

    

150

49.67

Whole Einkorn Flour

150

50

    

150

49.67

White Whole Wheat Flour (Starter)

      

2

0.66

Whole Rye Flour (Starter)

      

2

0.66

         

Hydration

    

41

100

251

83.11

Water

  

210

80.46

39

100

251

83.11

         

Salt

4

1.33

5

1.92

  

5

1.66

Vital Wheat Gluten

7.5

2.5

7.5

2.87

  

7.5

2.48

Starter (100% Hydration)

    

4

10.26

  

Levain

  

82

31.42

    
         

Add-ins

30

10.00

30

11.49

  

30

9.93

Blue Stilton, Crumbled

30

10.00

30

11.49

  

30

9.93

Sultanas, Rehydrated

18

6.00

18

6.90

  

18

5.96

Dried Rosemary

3

1.00

3

1.15

  

3

0.99

         

Total

  

595.5

228.16

82

210.26

595.5

197.19

 
(* For the instruction below, the numbers before and after the slash (/) are for the 1st formula and the 2nd formula respectively)
 

 

Sift out the bran from dough flour, reserve 37/39 g for the leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of water taken from dough ingredients. 


Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until ready, about 4/6 hours (25/24.5°C).

 

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the add-ins. Ferment for a total of 3/2.5 hours. Mix on low for 2 minutes at the 20 and 40 minute mark. Fold in the add-ins by a set of lamination at the 50 minute mark. After the bulk fermentation, shape the dough then put in into a banneton directly. Retard for 10/8 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Score and spritz the dough. Remove the dough from the fridge and bake straight at 250°C/482°F with steam for 20 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let it cool for a minimum of 2 hours before slicing.

 

 

 

Both loaves carry a pungent aroma thanks to the strong cheese used. The sweet, coconut-ey einkorn mellows the flavour a bit so that it wouldn’t be overwhelming. I particularly like the burst of sweetness the sultanas provide. It does a nice job balancing the spiciness of Blue Stilton.

 

 

_____

 

Smoked salmon biryani

 

Pressure-cooked lamb shank bao bun

 

 

Thai-inspired salad with roasted beef & pan-fried homemade mochi

 

 

Pan-grilled duck breast skewers with roasted herby potatoes

 

Japchae

 

Pressure-cooked tomato braised beef tongue with onion-ey mash

 

Pan-fried garlic chive lamb dumplings

 

alfanso's picture
alfanso

keeping busy, kinda.  My wife wanted something with fruit and nuts for a next bake.

Forkish FWSY Field Blend #2, alfanso style.  This one uses a 100% hydration all AP levain and toned down to 75% overall hydration.  First time adding anything to this wonderful bread, but the match seemed made to order.

If you've worked with add-ins like fruit or nuts and made a shape like baguettes, you probably have come across a similar obstacle.  The relatively thin diameter of the dough often allows the additional product to dictate its shape somewhere along the length.  Hence one of these has a slender waistline.  Also scoring can be hit or miss with with so much interruption of a clean score due to the "bumpy" parts.  It's their being in the way of the score line as well as their weight and interruption of the contiguous gluten structure that may affect the eventual grigne. 

3 x 415g baguettes/long batards.

Last week it was another Hamelman WW levain, but covered in bran flakes and shaped as one girthy beast.  The near end was lopped off before I snapped the photo.

1250g x 1 batard.

albacore's picture
albacore

Don't get too excited - the spelt is only 20% of the flour - but it makes for a nice loaf!

It's ages since I've posted details of one of my bakes on TFL. TFL is full of baking questions at the moment, so I thought a few details and pictures of my weekend spelt bake might give a bit of content variation.

It was a pretty simple bake (for me!) with 20% mockmilled spelt, 3% rye from the levain and a hydration of 74%. It includes 1% of my current favourite ingredient, fava bean flour.

I'm running a trial with my starter at the moment, keeping it on the counter and feeding it once a day, rather than keeping it in the fridge. The plan is to see if it has more "vitality" managing it this way.

Flour mix

    200g Mockmilled spelt
    780g bread flour
    10g diastatic malt flour
    10g fava bean flour


Levain

    Build 1 at e7 day0: 5/25BF-5rye/24water 27C
    Build 2 at m8 day1: 55/80-30/88 29C

 
Other

    True hydration 74%
    Salt 1.8%

Process  

    m11 day1: Spelt flour autolysed with 160g RT water + 2g salt
    e1 day1: 532g water in mixer, add dry flours and spelt mixture.  Autolyse 15min
    Add 225g levain, mix in
    3min low speed
    add 18g salt and mix 2min low speed
    Mix on high speed 1min 30secs
    Drip in 40g bassinage water on low speed, total time 4min
    Turn out of the mixer into proofing bowl, dough temp 25C
    Bulk ferment at 25C for 4hrs 15mins with a couple of coil folds. Volume increase about 55%
    Preshape to 2 x 850g batards. BR 20mins
    Shape, proof on counter for 20mins
    Retard in fridge overnight
    Score and bake as normal with steam

Thoughts

    Good ears and nice blisters.
    Pretty open crumb
    Mild flavour - I'd like to get a bit more lactic tang in - maybe by reducing levain quantity and fermenting longer?

Photos

Lance
   
   

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