The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ciabatta

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Bixmeister's picture

First Ciabattas 2010 on Kamado Smoker

January 3, 2010 - 11:13am -- Bixmeister

I just baked my first breads for 2010.   I hope all on the forum had a great year and holiday season.


Rather than labor through uploading etc.  I thought I would post a link to a forum that I just posted to.


Here is a link to my baking effort.   http://www.kamado.com/discus/messages/2/64406.html?1262544747


Bix


 

Arbyg's picture
Arbyg

Hello,


I had the urge to bake a little Ciabatta for Christmas so here are the results.  First batch in years so it needs some improvement.


Method:


62%hydration Biga


2.1%salt


80%water


1/2tsp inst. yeast


Flour KA 200g


biga 600g


Mix with hook until window pane fold once after 1hour, proof until double, bake 420 for30-35min

La masa's picture
La masa

I thought these ciabattas would make a nice first entry for my brand new blog .



  • 200 gr of  a 100% hydration whole rye poolish (sourdough, of course)

  • 500 gr bread flour (with a pretty high gluten content)

  • 380 gr water

  • 9 gr salt


3 hour bulk fermentation, retarded overnight in the fridge, 1 hour out of the fridge, shape (kind of) and 2 hour proof.


25 minutes in a very hot oven, 10 more with the oven turned off.



 



 



 


It's a great bread for the kind of sandwiches we like in Spain. I'm sure you have seen that chorizo in the background :-)

Caltrain's picture
Caltrain

I'm relatively new to breadmaking and I've been lurking here quite a bit. I think it's about time I made my first post, but since I want to show off my bread, why not make it a blog post?



^ Whole wheat sourdough ready for their overnight retard. Obama lurks in the background, waiting. Some 14 hours later, the boule pops out of the oven.

Lately I've been increasingly obsessed with baking (well, eating) the best damn whole wheat sourdough. WGB got me off to a good start, as did Laurel's but, ehh... something was missing. WGB was an amazing read, but its hearth bread made with sourdough... it was dense, chewy, and not at all what I wanted. The flavor was maybe not the right kind of nutty. So what it came down to was me searching this site inside out. There's quite a bit of valuable information around these parts! This last link also saved my sanity once or twice. :p

There were plenty of flat loafs in between, but I think I've got it.



^Bam.

I used 100% hydration sourdough starter that's ~3 months old. The final hydration was 82%.

I'm happy with how the loaf turned out. The oven spring was far better than I expected. I think the final tweak that made everything "click" was to not flip the dough onto a flat board for scoring, but into a shallow, parchment-lined bowl. The curvature of the bowl angled the dough in such a way that I got a flat surface to score. It made the dough look somewhat deflated and scoring actually harder without the surface tension, but somehow the "liveliness" of the dough was preserved better in the end. I scored the dough, then lifted it out by the parchment and dumped the whole affair into a covered 3.6 quart wide-lipped casserole. The casserole was also another great discovery. I dug it out of a thrift store intending to use the flat lid as a base, but found that using it right-side up gave the loaf juuust the right amount of structural support while still being largely free standing. I baked the loaf at 450 degrees for 30 minutes, and that was that.



^ The crumb.

I also whipped up some 115% hydration dough/batter for a shot at ciabatta.



^ The ciabatta posing with the boule in the back.

Like the round, I made an overnight soaker containing half the final flour and all of the salt and water. The ciabatta soaker was so hydrated that the water and flour gave up and separated into their own sedimentary layers. Not pretty. The next day I added the starter and remaining flour and stretch-and-folded it in the container with one hour rests in between. After the 3rd set of folding, the batter started peel easily from the container and I decided to divide dough into two and placed 'em in the fridge.

I wasn't expecting much of the ciabatta. It was just a side experiment, and the open vent on my aging oven makes steaming futile. I've gotten around on the boule with the glass casserole, but for the ciabatta, I just cranked my oven up to as high as it'll go and chucked in the ciabatta on the tiles for 10-15 minutes. There still managed to be pretty good oven spring.

So, how'd it do?



^ Damn. Either it was under-kneaded or flour simply wasn't meant to be this hydrated.

I ended up getting a cavern, and over-floured it while trying to shape it. Oh well; that didn't stop the bread from being some of the most deliciously airy and fluffy bread I've tasted with just the right tang. Once the excess flour was vigorously patted off, anyways.

So, there you go. If anyone would like the full recipe for the ciabatta, I'd be happy to post it. I'm still tweaking the hydration and so forth.


^ One last shot of the crust. Btw, apologies if the pictures seem washed out, poorly composed, or whatever. I'm not a photographer by any means.


Whole Wheat Sourdough

Soaker grams
whole wheat flour 230 g
salt 4 g
water 340 g
 
Final grams
soaker 574 g
starter (100% hydration)
140 g
salt 3-5 g
whole wheat flour 200 g
 
total 917 g
  1. On the day before:
    • Refresh the starter and thoroughly mix the soaker ingredients.

    • Cover the soaker and let it sit for 12 to 24 hours at room temperature for an overnight autolyse.

  2. Mixing and first rise:
    • Mix all final ingredients. Let the dough rest for 15 minutes, then stretch-and-fold in the bowl to ensure hydration is even. Cover the bowl, and let it sit at room temperature for 45 minutes.

    • I pre-heated an insulated proofing box (a cooler) with a heat pad set to "low". The ambient temperature should be around 90 degrees.

    • Stretch-and-fold the dough 3 times, with one hour rests following each iteration in the proofing box.

  3. Shaping and final proof:
    • Pre-shape, rest 15 minutes, then shape. Place the dough in cloth-lined proofing basket and cover snuggly with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest for 15 minutes.

    • Place the basket immediately in the refrigerator for a 12-24 hour overnight rise.

  4. Baking:
    • Remove the dough from the refrigerator and let it rest for 90 minutes.

    • Meanwhile, preheat oven to 475 F with a baking stone and a covered 3.6 qt glass casserole.

    • Flip the dough into a shallow, parchment-lined bowl. Score the dough.

    • Place the dough in the casserole, cover it, and bake for 30-35 minutes at 450 F degrees.

mrosen814's picture
mrosen814

Using the “no-knead” method, popularized by Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery, I went for a ciabatta this weekend.  There were a few adjustments I made to the recipe:



  1. I used 2/3 bread flour and 1/3 whole wheat flour, instead of 100% bread Flour.

  2. To develop the strength of the dough a bit, I used the “stretch-and-fold” technique several times throughout the 19-hour fermentation period.


Overall, I was pleased with the results.  The crumb had a nice open structure, with uneven holes throughout.  The crust was a bit thinner than I expected, and was hoping for a bit more oven spring. :)


 


PeterPiper's picture

Fermented fruit ciabatta

October 9, 2009 - 10:48am -- PeterPiper

Has anyone tried making some of Farine's fermented fruit ciabatta?  I tried a batch last week and hade a great time making some fermented apple juice, but it still didn't impart very much apple flavor to the ciabatta.  I'm wondering if anyone has experience making a stronger fruit ferment.  Here's how my apple hooch looks now:


 

alabubba's picture
alabubba

I love Ciabatta bread. One of my goals has always been to be able to bake it myself and have it turn out as good or better than the stuff from my local bakery.


I found "Jason's Quick Ciabatta" recipe and decided to give it a go.


Attempt #1 was delicious! It had the right crust and crumb and while I have some experience when it comes to slack dough I was not prepared for just how wet this recipe was. The forming left A LOT of room for improvement.


Attempt#2 I decided that the answer was to knead the crap out of it and add flour to help give it some structure. This helped with the form but took away from the chewiness of the crust.


Attempt#3 I stayed up late last night and watched several videos on youtube of ciabatta makers at work.

Several lights went off in my brain. After my initial mix and knead I portioned the dough out into separate bowls. Covered with plastic wrap and let them to rise. When they were ready I poured them onto a heavily floured table and quickly rough formed them. Not working the flour into the bread but using it to keep everything lubricated. Then let them rest for 20 min. and then transferred them onto plastic wrap that had been floured and dusted with cornmeal. Once on the plastic I could move them around and shape them with ease. I then used the plastic to flip them onto my peel and into my oven.



 



Thats what I am talking about!!!



This makes me smile...

smasty's picture

Coach me on Ciabatta

July 25, 2009 - 5:20pm -- smasty

Hi Everyone! I'm new to the forum.  I began a quest a few months ago to become a master artisan baker.  I'm not too far into it.  I started with "Artisan in 5" and realized I wasn't getting quite the quality I needed (though there is a place for that technique I think).  30 hours ago I embarked on my second true Ciabatta.  This time I used the recipe in Maggie Glezer's "Artisan Baking" book.  I'd love some comments/coaching.  Here's some of my observations:


1.  I'm in Denver at 6,000 feet, and followed the recipe as written

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