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Yolandat's picture
Yolandat

 I saw the blog as I was wondering though TFL for Bridge Rolls. I didn't know what they were or what they should look like so I checked it out. I am playing euchre with some of the women that I work with. it is an excuse to get together and drink lots of wine and nosh and gossip and yes play a little euchre. Hopefully these little Euchre Rolls with go with the Port Salut cheese and whatever anyone else has brought along. 

Tuirgin's picture
Tuirgin

 Plain, Asiago, Everything, and Rosa al Bianco


Back in March my wife sent me to a food blog to read about the "Best Pizza Dough Ever Recipe." In the post, Heidi Swanson gives some background to her discovery of Peter Reinhart's Neapolitano pizza dough along with an adapted version of the recipe from The Bread Baker's Apprentice. It seemed a bit detailed, but it sounded good and a few days later I gave it a go.


I'll admit I had a rough time of it. It was my first time working with wet dough—to date I'd only made some quick breads and some rather disappointing bread sticks, and this was a whole different beast. The first pizza went everywhere. The second was little better. Did I mention the smell of carbonized semolina flour? Altogether the pizzas were a mess, but they were still good enough that it showed promise, and it got me interested in checking out Reinhart's books.


Ten days later my wife surprised me with copies of The Bread Baker's Apprentice and American Pie. I switched to the AP Neapolitano dough and I've now made the pizzas 3 times. It's the best pizza I've ever had. Our favorite pizza so far is the Pizza Rosa al Bianco.


In the same time, I've been exploring a variety of bread recipes from BBA. For myself, the European style breads, and for my wife a variety of sandwich loaves. But one of the formulas has overshadowed all the others. First I made bagels for us. My entire family raved. Then I made bagels for my wife's co-workers. And then my mom wanted some for her school. I have been making between 2–3 dozen bagels per week for the last month or two. And thanks to some snooping around the forums here, my bagels have consistently gotten better with each batch. I have to admit it does feed my ego when people constantly tell me that my bagels are better than anything in town and that I should open up a shop. Most of the bagels I've had around here don't even begin to compete with these. Panera comes closest, but there are a few people insisting that these are better yet. I agree that they're good, but I'm still hunting for the perfect bagel.


In the meantime, I'm very proud of these and love making them with a couple tweaks to Mr. Reinhart's formula. The few changes I make are as follows:



  • Liberally add more flour—I need to measure this, because I'm consistently adding more flour as the dough seems fairly wet

  • Toss the proof times out the window—since I have to hand kneed 1-2 batches at a time, the bagels are often ready to be retarded just as soon as I have them shaped

  • Increase baking soda to 1/4 cup per pot of water—1 tbsp wasn't sufficiently gelatinizing the outer dough

  • Add malt syrup to the water until the water is tea colored (with thanks to those who have posted Jeffrey Hamelman's techniques)—without the malt, the bagels come out of the oven very pale


I've also experimented with some different toppings. I liked the ginger, garlic, sesame bagels I turned out, but my wife wasn't a fan of the ginger zing. The favorite topping, by far, has been my adaptation of the Pizza Rosa al Bianco from American Pie. I mince the red onion—is there any reason why everyone seems to use rehydrated onion for bagels?—and chop the pistachio nuts and rosemary smaller than I would for the pizzas. It still gets a huge heap of parmigiano reggiano and gets spritzed with olive oil before going into the oven.


Bagel Rosa al Bianco


There are still a few things I'd like to figure out. No matter what I do, the bagels don't have the texture I expect—the inside isn't quite a chewy as I think they should be, and I've tried using KA Sir Lancelot HG flour as well as boiling longer. The crust is also surprisingly soft. Chewy, yes, but shouldn't the crust have a crispness about them?


Regardless, these bagels are certainly satisfying. Everyone from my 2 year old daughter to my recently-vegan parents begs for them. And this makes me very, very happy.

dcsuhocki's picture
dcsuhocki

Polish bread is absolutely amazing!  Hundreds of ryes, rolls, street breads; the list is endless.  I will try to get some more pictures, but here's a start:


Link to some of my pictures of authentic Polish bread:


http://www.associatedcontent.com/slideshow/54352/polish_bread.html?cat=22


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I usually don't get to bake during the work week, but this was a slow week so I got some afternoon time at home. Last night, I made pizza with dough I froze a couple weeks ago.



I had used Peter Reinhart's formula from BBA. I'm going to get the hang of stretching pizza dough yet. My wife generously consented to eating pizza once a week or so, providing me more opportunities to work on it. She is so supportive ... at least in agreeing to eat one of her favorite foods.


Yesterday afternoon, I also mixed the dough for San Joaquin Sourdough and baked it this afternoon.



San Joaquin Sourdough with peaches and nectarines from this afternoon's farmers' market



Crumb


 I made this with a firm (50% hydration) starter that had been refrigerated for 6 days. I did not refresh it before mixing the dough. It was plenty active.


Because I used a firmer starter than my usual 75% hydration, I increased the water by 10 gms to get my usual dough consistency. I kept the same ratio of starter to flour by weight, so the actual amount of pre-fermented flour was higher than usual. The flavor that resulted from these variations was slightly but noticeably more sour.


It's been fun, but I'm back to my customary work schedule for the rest of the week.


David

Teegstar's picture
Teegstar

This is my first blog post on TFL, although I've been lurking around for nearly a year now. I started getting in to sourdough baking in Spring (southern hemisphere) last year but my poor little starter went on hiatus when we took a couple of months overseas holiday at the beginning of this year. Now it's June and I'm only just reawakening Owen, my starter. Luckily, our housesitter indulged my detailed instructions on feeding Owen while we were away. (Although she said something along the lines of "if I had a baby whose nappy smelled as bad as that bread thingy, I wouldn't change it"...)


I decided I wanted to make some bread with a cold retardation -- this tends to fit with my schedule a bit better than trying to go through the whole process in one day. Because my baking results have been inconsistent, I am also hedging my bets by making a yeasted bread that fits almost the same schedule as the sourdough.


For my yeasted bread, I'm using the Baguettes a l'Ancienne posted by DonD a few weeks ago: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17415/baguettes-l039ancienne-cold-retardation


For my sourdough, I'm using the Pierre Nury Rustic Light Rye posted by zolablue: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5500/pierre-nury’s-rustic-light-rye-leader 


So I mixed up my flour mixture and levain last night. Hiccup one: when I got up this morning, my sourdough levain looked virtually unchanged. I'm not used to using a stiff starter, so maybe it's meant to look like a floury lump, but I wasn't convinced there was enough life in the levain to rise the bread. So I have divided that recipe in half, using half the stiff levain and half my usual wet starter, which I fed last night. 


Here's hoping that I get some success out of one of the three doughs currently fermenting on my counter!


 


 


EDIT: the next day


Gahhh! My sourdough has COMPLETELY flopped -- didn't rise at all except for a little half-hearted attempt during baking. I should have known the starter and levain weren't going to do the job, but gosh I wanted them to! Plus I think I got the gluten development thing right this time. 


I haven't baked the yeasted bread yet but I'm reallyreallyreally hoping I get at least one good loaf out of this three-day effort!

charisma's picture
charisma

Cant believ what just happened!!!!!!


 


I just typed a whole blog on howi mad the worst pretzels...and even that got lost!!!!hell ...Iam definitely jinxed with pretzels i think!!!!


I baked two..absolutely horrendous , unedible pretzel batches.....am so upset..I think ill just go to the technicalities and leave out the emotions( or at least try)


i used dry active yeast


1) my 1st batch....the dough did not double even after one hour,....should i have left it longer


2) 2nd batch, left it overnight to ferment(had to leave for work) and it was so soggy that i could not roll it


3)how does boiling a pretzel help it


4)the wannabes(Even I cant  call them pretzels) were stone hard...the 1st batch was rubbery and uncooked and the 2nd were hard as bread sticks!!!!


5) How do the pictures show these well browned pretzels...mine were white, the colour of the flour even after they were hard!!!!


6) are there some basic baking rules in making the dough which can be learnt only by watching...because i read it online and did the kneading, proofing relaxing bit


7)Pl advice:)


taking a break form pretzels, i found them were ego damaging!!!!

bates24's picture
bates24

Am looking for a counter bread slicer.

tracie's picture
tracie


When my dad left school, at age 14, just after WWII, he worked in Manchester, (England) at a bakery.  His claiim to fame was making Bridge Rolls for Winston Churchill.  His stint in the bakery was short lived due to his contracting dermatisis. However, he never lost the 'knack' for kneeding and would often drive my mother to distraction by kneeding pastry with more vigour than necessary.  It has been a whim of mine to make bridge rolls, as they are not readily available in bakeries that I have been to in the USA.  This weekend I went online, typed in 'bridge rolls' and attempted the first recipe that popped up.  They were wonderful.  Cakey, sweet, and my husband thoroughly enjoyed them with cream cheese, whilst my daughter prefered an egg mayonaise topping.  They are perfect for a quick snack and make a wonderful addition to the finger food buffet list!  My dad, unfortuately, passed away 5 years ago, so I couldnt tell him about my latest bread accomplishment, but my mum seemed delighted that I had chosen these particular rolls to add to my collection! The best thing about them is that they are small, so you dont look greedy if you go back for more!!  Thanks for listening!


Tracie

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer


Another bread from the book "Bourke Street Bakery", using the same white sourdough dough as this hazelnut current bread. The potatoes were roasted until barely soft and chopped to big chunks, so that they don't get lost in the dough. I have had too many potato chunks disappearing into the bread, I might have over-compensated and chopped them "too big", however they are delicious though.



The book has quite a few breads using the same basic dough, with different add-ins. The flow is very easy: 2 hours of bulk rise, shape and into the fridge overnight, take out and rise again next morning, then bake. Last time I let it warm up for almost 2 hours, this time it was 1.5 hours, judging from the scoring mark and crumb, I think 1.5 hours is better in my case. Other than roasted potato, there's also fresh rosemary to complement the flavor. Original recipe also used a little soy flour and nigella seeds, I have neither, so I used equal amount of buckwheat flour and poppy seeds, a nice subtle effect.



I am still trying to get up enough courage to try the pie and tarts formulas from this book. It's 100F+ here in Dallas, not the best time to make pastry dough, but cool weather is 4 months away, sigh...

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Still no baking... much to busy on everything else for now, although it's really starting to bug me that I'm not making wonderful smells in the kitchen!


 



All the T-111 siding and trim is now on...


 



Got the first 4 courses of lap siding installed on the front... And my wife is already taking trips to the storage unit to start filling up the shed ...and I'm still 2 or 3 weeks away from being done!


 



The shop progress is coming along too.  Insulation has been added to the perimeter of the stem wall, gravel filled and leveled inside the foundation, 4" of foam insulation added, and wire mesh laid in place ...ready for pouring of the slab.


 


Brian


 

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