The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
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chimerical's picture

Need professional-baking tips asap!

April 19, 2015 - 9:56pm -- chimerical
Forums: 

So I recently just about got on board with a small bakery, but I have absolutely zero professional, in-kitchen experience! I have been baking and formulating my own recipes. studying, etc. for several years on an at-home level and finally took the next step to working in a real baking environment. All of this would be of smaller concern to me if it were not that the owner wants me to implement my recipes and ideas to expand the bakery. 

reedlaw's picture

Gas oven with baking stones or electric pizza oven?

April 19, 2015 - 8:08pm -- reedlaw

I'm trying to decide on a suitable upgrade from a home oven used to make artisan breads using dutch ovens to a commercial oven with baking stones and improvised steam. I'm in China and gas ovens save over electric but they usually have stainless steel decks with little rubber bumpers to keep the baking pans from scratching (can be seen in the red reflection below).

Gas Oven

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Sourdough Italian Rolls

April 18, 2015

Those familiar with my San Joaquin Sourdough will recognize the rolls I baked today as its Italian cousin. Besides the obvious difference that these are rolls rather than bâtards, they also have around 20% Durum flour, some sugar and olive oil, and they have a sesame seed coating.

I developed this formula in 2011. Originally, it had both diastatic malt and suger. It was pointed out to me that the AP flour is already malted, and, as a sweetener, the malt is redundant. I really didn't need both malt and sugar. So, today's version omits the malt.

 

Total Dough

 

 

Ingredient

Amount (gms)

Bakers' %

AP flour

434

79

Fine Durum flour

100

18

WW flour

11

2

Whole Rye flour

5

1

Water

400

73

Salt

10

1.8

Sugar

14

2.5

EVOO

14

2.5

Total

988

179.8

  

Liquid Levain

 

 

Ingredient

Amount (gms)

Bakers' %

Liquid starter

40

40

Water

100

100

AP flour

70

70

WW flour

20

20

Whole Rye flour

10

10

Total

240

240

  1. Disperse the liquid starter in the water.

  2. Add the flours and mix thoroughly.

  3. Ferment at room temperature until expanded and bubbly (8-12 hours). If necessary, refrigerate overnight and let warm up for an hour before using.

 

Final Dough

 

Ingredient

Amount (gms)

AP flour

400

Fine Durum flour

100

Water

350

Salt

10

Sugar

14

Active liquid levain

100

EVOO

14

Total

988

Procedures

  1. In a large bowl, disperse the levain in the water.

  2. Add the flours and sugar to the liquid and mix to a shaggy mass.

  3. Cover the bowl and let it rest for 20-60 minutes.

  4. Add the salt and olive oil and mix thoroughly. (Note: I squish the dough with my hands until it comes back together, then do stretch and folds in the bowl until it forms a smooth ball and the oil appears completely incorporated.)

  5. Transfer the dough to a 2 quart lightly oiled bowl, and cover the bowl tightly.

  6. After 30 minutes, do stretch and folds in the bowl. Repeat 3 more times at 30 minute intervals.

  7. Refrigerate for 12-36 hours. (Today, I retarded for 23 hrs.)

  8. Divide the dough into 8 or 9 equal pieces and pre-shape as rounds or logs. Cover with a clean towel, baker's linen or plasti-crap and let rest for one hour. (Today, I scaled 6 rolls at 4 oz and 3 rolls to 3.65 oz.)

  9. Shape as long rolls and proof en couche or on a baking sheet for about 45 minutes. (Note: Optionally, roll the rolls on damp paper towels, then in a tray of sesame seeds. Alternatively, you can brush the loaves with water and sprinkle with sesame seeds.)

  10. One hour before baking, pre-heat the oven to 480ºF with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

  11. Transfer the rolls to a peel. Score them, if desired. Transfer the rolls to the baking stone. Or, if the rolls were proofed on a baking sheet, score the rolls and place the sheet in the oven. 

  12. Steam the oven, and turn the temperature down to 460ºF.

  13. After 10 minutes, remove the steaming apparatus. (Note: If you have a convection oven, switch to convection bake and turn the oven down to 435ºF for the remainder of the bake.) Continue baking for another 6-8 minutes or until the rolls are nicely browned and the internal temperature is at least 205ºF.

  14. Transfer the rolls to a cooling rack. Cool completely before eating.

Sourdough Italian Roll crumb

My wife frequently asks me to make “soft” rolls to use for her sandwiches, but I seldom do so for some reason. I baked these while she was out. When she got home and saw them, she asked if she could use them to make sandwiches for the bridge group she is hosting next week. I know I can make more, so I just asked to save one for us to share with dinner. Well, after tasting the dinner roll, she started talking about getting rolls from the bakery for her bridge group and reserving the sourdough Italian rolls for us. I thought they were pretty good too. In fact, the flavor was so good I would hesitate to cover it with sandwich fillings.

 

I also made some blueberry muffins. The recipe is from The Best Recipe, by the America's Test Kitchen folks. 


They were delicious as well.

 

Happy baking!

David

Submitted to yeastspotting

Lunapequenita's picture

Bernard Clayton Croissant Recipe Help

April 19, 2015 - 6:46pm -- Lunapequenita

Has anyone tried Bernard Clayton's croissant recipe? I have never made them before and tried making the dough with the recipe in his Book of Small Breads, and it came out terribly. The dough was extremely wet. I tried adding more flour but it wouldn't come together as a solid mass at all and was almost like a batter. I tried adding even more flour and when I checked on the next day, it smelled very yeasty and was still very sticky and much too sticky to roll (or so it seems to me). 

thedoughycoed's picture
thedoughycoed

I based this loaf on the Semolina from Tartine. Very pleased with this one. I incorporated a bench rest period, which I think may have helped my shaping issue from last week. The crumb is so nice and chewy and a little sweet and nutty. The crust is a little thinner and lighter than in previous loaves which I like, and I attribute to using parchment in the dutch oven instead of oil. I'm currently enjoying it as a triple decker sandwich with butter lettuce, guacamole, smoked turkey, and bacon. 

mikelegrande's picture

KitchenAid K5A wiring

April 19, 2015 - 1:31pm -- mikelegrande

I have opened the motor head assembly and see several frayed wires. I need video help or a repair manual to show how to disassemble and replace wiring. Any ideas on where to get help? 

I am familiar with repairing gears as I have done it on newer models.

I also read a suggestion about replacing the controller with the K5SS one.

Grobread's picture
Grobread

Lately I've been experimenting with steamimg methods. Before this I had been using a pan full of lava rocks, preheated with the oven, and pouring a cup of boiling water after loading the bread. It worked rather well, but the main problem was that it was really hard for me to get the oven hot enough with the rocks in --the most I could get was 230°C-- and then after I loaded the bread and poured the water there was a lot of steam immediately, but most of it vents shortly after, and the temperature droped about 20° or more, and the flame goes out so I have to reach under the burner with a lighter (wich is probably not very safe). Also, I burned my hand the last time I did it because I forgot to wear an oven mitt; so I decided it was time to look for a more efficient method and came up with this:

I plugged a plastic tube through the hole on the lid of this pressure cooker. I stuffed it with aluminum foil so that most of the steam goes through the tub, but some of it escapes through the sides, but still most of it makes its way to the oven. I insulated the last section of the tube, which goes inside the oven, with masking tape, and also cover it with a piece of cloth; and it goes in through the broiler door, beneath the flame.

I think it should work fine, I tried it before with the oven off and saw that after only a few minutes the oven is saturated with steam. And my favourite part is that with this method I can get the oven to 250°C or more and the steam doesn't cool it down at all. But when I tried baking some baguettes with it I got a very pale and thick crust. I pre-steamed for five minutes, then let it on five minutes more after loading the oven, turned the steam off and waited for 7 minutes before opening the door to vent it, then baked them for 18 min more (30 in total).

My only idea is that the paleness is due to an overproofing (they were also very flat), and that the thickness means it was too much? Maybe I should try steamming for 5 minutes and venting immediately? 

I would like to know if anybody has tried this before and if they have any thoughts on why it isn't working well.

victoriamc's picture
victoriamc

I tried and tested a few dough combinations and surprising as it may sound, the sourdough whole spelt marries amazingly well with an enriched yeast chocolate dough.  It was such a labor of love this bake I have published it, rather demo-style.  For details look on www.mybreadandbrot.com

 

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