The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
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zachyahoo's picture
zachyahoo

Well, here's my very first sourdough loaf! I've had the starter going for a couple of weeks now. Started with a 100% rye one and then forked it off into a 100% bread flour one. I had a kinda unusual time table for this loaf.

Built levain at around 4:30pm. Let that rise for 6 hours in a warm oven (pan with hot water in it)

Then, I mixed the final dough (there was an hour autolyse of the flour and water in there too) and let that bulk ferment for about 4 hours with some stretching and folding (only did about 3 but should have done more). It was about 3 am when they had finished being divided, pre-shaped, shaped, and went into the fridge overnight.

Then, this loaf (pictured above and below) got taken out at 8:30, went into the oven at 10am.

The other stayed in the fridge until about 5:45 pm when it went into the oven.

Definitely learned a lot from this experience. And will definitely be trying it again!

Does it look like it was shaped too much by how it pulled off the floor of the oven (the football shape)?

 

isand66's picture
isand66

  I made this loaf last week but didn't have time to post it until now.  I made a similar bread over last summer which came out great and this version was even better.  The addition of the beer and rye chops really pushed this one over the top.  I also used some white rye flour which is traditional in this style of bread.  The caraway seeds were added to the main dough mix for added flavor.

The crumb was nice and moist and flavorful.  Just an ideal deli style bread better than anything you will ever buy from the super market bread aisle.

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Formula

Sprouted Rye Bread with Beer (%)

Sprouted Rye Bread with Beer (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here..

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Levain Directions

Build 1: Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Build 2: Add the flour and water as indicated and mix thoroughly.  Let it sit at room temperature for 7-8 hours plus or minus until starter has peaked.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Rehydrate the onions in the water/beer mixture for a minute or two.  Next, mix the flours, rye chops, caraway seeds and water/onion mixture together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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gilchrsd's picture

Wild Rice and Onion Bread with Rosemary

February 26, 2016 - 1:37pm -- gilchrsd

Silly question from a "starter". Peter Reinhart's recipe for Wild Rice and Onion Bread offers the option of adding herbs, such as rosemary, to the dough.  Questions:

  1. Use fresh or dry rosemary? Does it require any pre-treatment prior to adding to the dough (soaking, etc.)
  2. How much rosemary per loaf
  3. Open to other suggestions such as don't do it or other herbs that might enhance. No not that herb! 

Thanks in advance for your guidance.

Floorman's picture
Floorman

As I was making a couple of loaves of white and still experimenting with rye breads I had some dough from both. I thought it would be fun for the kids to have a  mixed loaf for the weekend. And they did enjoy the combination, they filled up their tummies... Just having fun and experimenting!

katyajini's picture

Baking baguettes with Steel and Steam.....

February 26, 2016 - 11:48am -- katyajini
Forums: 

Hi everyone!

I have a new convection oven and a Steel piece to use as stone, all new equipment for me, and need a little direction and help getting started to make baguettes (which I am also learning to prepare). I thought this would be the best place to ask...

Should I use 'convection bake' or 'convection roast' or just plain 'bake' to make baguettes?

Which rack should I position the Steel?

And if using convection and Steel should I still preheat the oven to 550F and lower it to 475 after adding the dough?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Here we ae in the primary season in AZ and they have mailed out the early ballots to those who have signed up.  I was shocked to find that every candidate who was ever in the race on the Democrat and Republican side is still on the ballot ……even though many have dropped put.  But, there was one addition that no one knew was even running – the CEO of Apple Inc. – Tim Cook.  Who knew!  I’m guessing in he gets elected, Apple won’t be cracking open their phones any time soon.

 

We have been making a lot of multiple starter breads lately by using multiple whole and sprouted grains with plenty of seeds and nuts.  Usually we use LaFama AP flour for the white portion of these breads, if there is any in the mix, finding it to be perfectly fine for making bread with its 11.2% protein.

 

High gluten and bread flour generally have the same protein levels of 12-14% but the flour is milled from different types of flour.  While not higher in protein, high gluten flour has more of the proteins; glutenin and gliadin, that bind into gluten strands with water.

 

The wheat that has the most of these two proteins is Dark (Red) Spring Hard Wheat grown in the Northern climes, with White Spring Hard Wheat coming in a close 2nd, are used to make high gluten flour - mainly for bagels and pizzas.  Bread flour is usually a combination of these 2 Spring Hard Wheats and Red or White Hard Winter Wheat.

 

Both Bread and High Gluten flours cost 2-3 times more than the 30 cents a pound I pay for LaFama AP.  Many folks, including myself have used VWG as a cheap way to up the protein of AP flour into Bread and High Gluten range for a few pennies a pound.  This way is tough to beat economically.

 

The question is, do you get the same results using AP and VWG as using the much more expensive Bread or High Gluten flour for the white portion of bread mixes.  Since my bread usually contain 50% whole multi-grains with half of them being sprouted, this is the mix that I am going to use to see if it makes sense to spend more to get more and if that more is worth the extra expense.

  

We are also using Lucy’s SOP for making bread of late.  Multiple starters with half being SD.  Using the bran form the sprouted and whole grain flour to feed the levain first followed by the high extraction of whole grain  Using a 3 stage build over 12 hours with a 36 hour retard if the built levain.

 

Warming up the levain by stirring it down and then letting it rise 25 % before incorporating it into the autolyse of dough flour and water with the salt sprinkled on top.  Once the levain hits the autolyze we do 3 sets of 30 slap and folds and 3 sets of compass point stretch and folds all on 30 minute intervals.

 

Once the gluten development was finished, we let the dough rest for 30 minutes before pre-shaping and final shaping into a squat oval to fit the basket shape.  Since it is not a boule or a batard, Lucy calls this a batoule.  The dough was placed in to the rive floured basket, bagged and tossed into the cold fridge for 18 hours of shaped retard.

 

We love Panang Seafood Curry and Smoked  Dark Meat Chicken

The rested batoole came out of the fridge looking about 80% proofed.  I thought about starting up Big Old Betsy for the preheat to 500 F immediately but decided to wait 45 minutes before doing so.  The dough was ve y cold not much of anything g was happening on the proof side at this point.

 

Can't go wrong with a huge tray of Lemon Curd Bars

Once Betsy beeped saying she was at the set temperature. We loaded in the Mega Steam and set the timer for 15 minutes to let the stones catch up and get the steam really billowing before un-molding the batoule to parchment on a peel, slashing it quickly down the middle and sliding it into the oven for 18 minutes of steam bath at 450 F.

It has been at least 20 years since i last had my Mom;s Scalloped Potatoes that Granny used to make too.

Once the Mega Steam came out of the oven we turned the oven down to 425 F convection for 22 minutes of dry heat with the desert wind blowing. It really sprang and bloomed well under steam and browned up nicely without it.

 

We will have to see how the crumb came out but it looks promising using the Hi Gluten and Bread flour mix the 50% white flour.

The fix is in.  This bread is everything I want in a half whole multi- grain bread where half the whole grains are sprouted.  The flavor is complex, earthy and delicious.  The crust came out crispy but went soft as it cooled.  The crust was thin and became chewy chewy.  I think using 425 F, instead of 450 F when the steam came out to finish baking, was the difference.  The crumb was very open soft and moist for a bread with 50% whole grains.  We really love this bread.  We have made a few of these breads that were similar but none ever came out this good in every category.   This is the bread we want to take on a deserted Island if we could only choose one.  Can't wait to see what the VWG version does.

 

Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

3 Rye Sour

9

0

0

9

1.61%

Witch Yeast

3

0

0

3

0.54%

Cooked Potato Starter

3

0

0

3

0.54%

Raw Potato Starter

3

0

0

3

0.54%

88% Extraction 6 Grain

0

0

26

26

4.64%

12% Extraction 6 Grain

15

0

0

15

2.68%

17% Extraction Sprouted  6 Grain

0

26

0

26

4.64%

Water

15

26

26

67

11.96%

Total

48

52

52

152

27.14%

      

Levain Totals

 

%

   

 Sprouted & Whole 6 Grain

76

13.57%

   

Water

76

13.57%

   

Levain Hydration

100.00%

    
      

Dough Flour

 

%

   

KA Bread Fl. /High Gluten 50/50

280

50.00%

   

83 % Extraction Sprouted 6 Grain

121

21.61%

   

88% Extraction 6 Grain

83

14.82%

   

 

 

 

   

Salt

11

1.96%

   

Water

368

65.71%

   

 

 

    

Dough Hydration

76.03%

    

Total Flour w/ Starters

560

    

Total Water

444

    
      

Hydration with Starter

79.29%

    

Total Weight

1,065

    

% Sprouted 6  Grain

25.00%

    

% Whole 6 Grain

50.00%

    
      

6 Whole and Sprouted Grain flour is equal amounts

   

of Wheat, Kamut, Spelt, Rye, Emmer & Barley

    

Lucy reminds us to always have a salad or two with all that other, less healthy, stuff we eat!

JeffyWu's picture

Hamelman v. Reinhart

February 26, 2016 - 9:11am -- JeffyWu

Hi everyone,

I have both Jeff Hammelman's "Bread" and Peter Reinhart's "The Apprentice" and am having trouble reconciling the two with regard to sour dough.  I made a starter from the Apprentice's methodology and it's worked beautifully in several of the formulas for that book. I'd like to use it in some of "Bread's" recipes but the proportions seem to be so different (1 c. of starter vs. only a couple of Tbs.)  Am I comparing apples and oranges or am I missing some obvious commonality?  Thanks!

 

 

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