The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
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gmagmabaking2's picture

We 3 gmas baked glazed lemon bread and lemon glazed bread

May 28, 2014 - 5:11pm -- gmagmabaking2

I know that sounds confusing... and boy was it interesting in the texts and emails... sounded like we were typing under the influence... there really are two recipes... lemon glazed bread in the intro picture made by Barb, and glazed lemon bread as in this picture...

rozeboosje's picture

Tipo 00 grano tenero .... success!

May 28, 2014 - 10:37am -- rozeboosje
Forums: 

Having used mostly high protein flour in my first few months of baking sourdough, I recently tried out a tipo '00' "grano tenero" flour with a much lower protein content. I have to say I'm very pleasantly surprised. Not only does it give me a lovely crumb but the flavour is quite lovely.

What are your experiences using the "softer" flours in bread making?

ntosaj's picture

Assistent VS. Globe 10qt

May 28, 2014 - 9:35am -- ntosaj

Hey there everyone, I'm new here and I've been trawling the forum and reading up on mixers. Two that have stuck out to me are the globe 10qt and the Ankarsrum Assistent.

I'd be using the mixer to make significant batches of bread, croissants and brioche, possibly on a small commercial scale and was wondering what you folks might suggest?

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

When I was in the UK last week, I made David's excellent recipe below.  As I have done many times in the past, I prepared the dough and froze half of it to bake later.  I hadn't tried this with baguettes, so I was interested in how it would turn out.  I froze the dough for four days. On the first batch, I had a heck of a time moving them, as I didn't have all the tools I have in my home kitchen.  They got a bit flat as I moved them. For the second batch, I bought a metal baguette baker with tiny holes that I used for the final proof and baking, and this worked much better for me.

I defrosted the dough overnight in the fridge, and it was ready to go the next morning.  I followed the recipe instructions from there, placing the new baguette baker on a heated stone.

My husband really enjoyed these baguettes, as did our UK friends who tried them.  The taste was wonderful and the crumb fine. My husband loved the really crusty crust.

San Joaquin Sourdough Baguettes

Total ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

479

89

WW Flour

33

6

Medium rye Flour

29

5

Water

392

72

Salt

10

1.8

Liquid starter

17

3

Total

960

176.8

9.2% of the flour is pre-fermented

Liquid Levain ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

AP Flour

29

70

WW Flour

8

20

Medium rye Flour

4

10

Water

42

100

Liquid starter

17

40

Total

100

240

 

Final dough ingredients

Wt (g)

AP Flour

450

WW Flour

25

Medium rye Flour

25

Water

350

Salt

10

Liquid levain

100

Total

960

 

Method

  1. Mix the levain by dissolving the liquid starter in the water, then add the flours and mix well. Ferment at room temperature, covered tightly, until the surface is bubbly and wrinkled. (8-12 hours)
  2. Dissolve the levain in the water, add the flours and mix to a shaggy mass. Cover and autolyse for 30 minutes.
  3. Add the salt and mix to incorporate.
  4. Transfer to a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly.
  5. Bulk ferment for 3-4 hours with stretch and folds in the bowl every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours, then a stretch and fold on the board after 2.5 hours. The dough should have expanded by about 50% and be full of small bubbles.
  6. Refrigerate the dough for 18-24 hours.
  7. Take the dough out of the refrigerator and transfer it to a lightly floured board.
  8. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces and pre-shape as logs or round.
  9. Cover the pieces and allow them to rest for 60 minutes.
  10. Shape as baguettes and proof for 45 minutes, covered.
  11. Pre-heat the oven to 500ºF with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.
  12. Transfer the baguettes to your peel. Turn down the oven to 480ºF. Score the loaves and load them onto your baking stone.
  13. Bake with steam for 10 minutes, then remove your steaming apparatus and continue to bake for another 10-12 minutes. (Note: After 10 minutes, I switched my oven to convection bake and turned the temperature down to 455ºF.)
  14. Remove the loaves to a cooling rack, and cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

BobS's picture
BobS

The recent posts from wassisname and limmitedbaking got me hankering to try this bread.

I used the formula here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/34729/polenta-pepita-sourdough, but, as happens in the Hippie Kitchen, modified the method:

  1. Mix flours, polenta and water, autolyse 30 min. I used KA Bread and WW flours.
  2. Add levain, salt and pepitas; slap-and-fold until there is some gluten development.
  3. Bulk ferment 3 hours, folding 3 times.
  4. Scale, rest, shape.
  5. Retard in fridge about 18 hours.

Then baked at 460F for 15 minutes with steam, then another 20 minutes at 460 F without steam, then 10 minutes at 410F convection.

It's really good. You wouldn't think such a little bit of polenta would make such a difference, but it does.

Pepita Polenta Sourdough

pmiker's picture

steaming, cooling, mistakes and successes

May 27, 2014 - 1:40pm -- pmiker
Forums: 

This is my second attempt at Vermont Sourdough from Bread by Jeffrey Hamelman.  The first attempt was edible and some folks loved it but I really screwed it up.  I used a rye starter that has proven quite healthy.  I welcome all advice, critiques and comments.

I used the tips from SylviaH for steaming.  Yep, it works.  Lots of steam.  Ouch, I need longer gloves.  But how long should I steam?  I let it steam for at least 10 minutes until the sides started to brown.  The towels were still wet and steaming.

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