The Fresh Loaf

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audra36274's picture
audra36274

It has rained for 4 days now. We are all stir crazy, so we made pizza. The kids did their own toppings. This one was just pepperoni. As they say in the papers, " A good time was had by all" .

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

My wife has been an instructor in some women's groups recently that have had, as one component, some instruction in cooking.  She was a bit surprised to find just how much interest there was among the women who attended these sessions in learning more about cooking.  For some, it was an opportunity to expand their repertoire with new recipes or techniques.  For others, it was a chance to learn basic skills that they had not been taught previously.  


Based on those experiences, she has begun a series of classes in our home that will cover a range of topics; including meal planning, cooking and baking.  The first class met yesterday and I found myself instructing three students on the finer points of how to make a honey whole-wheat bread.  (My work schedule gives me every other Friday off.)  It's an old pattern; she has an idea and I have work.  ;-)  


We kept everything low key.  I had baked a loaf yesterday morning prior to class so that they could see and taste the finished product.  They got to see the differences in measuring by volume and measuring by weight, and were more than a little surprised to see that their normal measuring methods produced some significantly different quantities of flour, on a weight basis.  We allowed the whole wheat flour a short soak (not a true autolyse) and explained how that would affect the texture of the dough and the finished bread, as well as the amount of kneading that would be required.  We also covered the basic differences between enriched, straight doughs (yesterday's subject) and lean and delayed-fermentation doughs.  Although we weren't focusing on sourdough yesterday, I showed them my starter and explained some of the differences between naturally-yeasted and commercially-yeasted breads.  While their dough was rising, we sampled the finished bread that I had baked.  My wife also demonstrated some spreads and toppings that they could easily make, and provided those recipes.  By the time we were done, each student had mixed, kneaded and shaped their own loaf of bread, which they took  home to bake.  Although I stressed the importance of allowing the bread to cool to room temperature, one already e-mailed back to say that her loaf disappeared that same afternoon.  However, she is planning to make more!  


There's already talk about future classes for cinnamon rolls, pretzels, bagels, and sourdough.  We'll have to see how all of that plays out.  The good thing is that there are now more converts to baking their own bread at home.  And, yes, I pointed them to The Fresh Loaf as an excellent resource for additional information and help.


Paul

koloatree's picture
koloatree

Pictured below is a sourdough raisin walnut bread. the recipe i copies is from ehanner at http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6629/raisin-walnut-sd-delight. i sliced it thin, toasted + butter + a little extra cinnamon sugar on top = YUM! i was hoping to get a larger ovenspring but i dont think my oven was hot enough. i also didnt score the bread properly.


 



 



 


 


below is another attempt at baguettes. these were also sourdough using KA All Purpose flour. Once again, my oven was not at proper temp so i am sure that contributed to the lack of oven spring. also, this time i used a large alluminum pan to cover the bread and also placed a small cast iron skillet inside for additional steam. i still need to learn proper shaping technique and i want to try a better flour with 11.4% protein. does even a few tengths  of protein contribute to color and oven spring?


 



 



 


deep dish pizza for later that day. credit goes to BTB on pizzamaking.com. here is what i use for a 9Inch round pan 2 inches tall. i sauteed onions and green peppers, used italian sausage, red pack whole peeled tomatoes, preshredded maggio mozzerella, lots'a spinach, and a sprinkle of parmesian ramano. cooked at 480 for 30-35 minutes.


Flour and Semolina Blend* (75% 25%)
Water (47%)
ADY (.7%) convert to IDY use ~25% less
Olive Oil (6%)
Corn Oil (18.5%)
Butter/Margarine (1%)
Sugar (1.5%)
Salt (1.5%)


 



 



 


 


 


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

 


Susan from San Diego, of “Magic Bowl” fame, has posted two of her basic sourdough bread recipes. These have been on my lengthy “to bake list” for a long time. The photos of her breads are stunning, and many other TFL members have baked from her recipes and enthused about their results.


This weekend, I baked two boules of her “Original Sourdough” - to be distinguished from her “Ultimate Sourdough.” The latter can be found here:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6927/well-i-finally-did-it


I made some modifications in procedures which I will describe, but Susan's original “Original Sourdough” formula can be found here:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/8884/susan039s-original-sourdough-3262007


 


David's Un-original Sourdough after Susan from San Diego's Original Sourdough


Note: This recipe involves 3 “builds” - a “starter,” a “sponge” and the “dough.”


Starter


Active starter 1Tablespoon


Water           15 gms


Bread flour    25 gms


 


Sponge


Water           240 gms


Bread flour    173 gms


Whole wheat flour 50 gms (I used KAF White Whole Wheat.)


Starter All of the above


 


Dough


Bread flour      284 gms


Water              60 gms


Olive oil           14 gms


Salt                7.5 gms


 


Procedures


(I did my mixing in a KitchenAid Accolade.)


Make the Starter by dissolving the active starter in the water in a small bowl, adding the flour and mixing until all the flour is well hydrated. Cover tightly and allow to ferment for about 8 hours. It should be puffy and slightly bubbly. Refrigerate for up to 3 days if you are not ready to use it immediately.


Make the Sponge by dissolving the Starter in the water in a medium-sized bowl. Mix the flours and add them to the dissolved starter. Mix thoroughly and then cover the bowl tightly. Allow the Sponge to ferment until it is bubbly and has expanded - about 8 hours.


Make the dough by dissolving the Sponge in the water and mix in the olive oil in the bowl or your mixer. Mix the flour and salt, add it to the wet ingredients and mix with a spoon or spatula or with the paddle at Speed 1 to a shaggy mass. Cover the bowl and let it rest for 20 minutes to an hour. (This will allow the flour to hydrate and the gluten to start developing.)


Switch to the dough hook and mix at Speed 2 until you have moderate gluten development. (This took me about 10 minutes.) The dough should clean the sides of the bowl but stick to the bottom with a diameter of about 6 inches.


Scrape the dough onto your lightly floured bench and do a couple of stretch and folds. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly. (I use a 8 cup glass measuring “cup” with a tight-fitting plastic cover.) Stretch and fold the dough 3 times at 30 minute intervals, then allow to rise in the bowl until double the original volume – about 4 hours in my coolish kitchen.


Divide the dough into 2 equal parts and pre-shape into rounds. Cover and allow to rest for 10-15 minutes. Then, shape the pieces into boules and place each in a floured banneton. Cover with plastic wrap, a towel or place the bannetons in food grade plastic bags.


At this point, you can either allow the loaves to proof until 1.5 times their original size or retard them for 8-12 hours in the refrigerator. (For this bake, I proofed and baked one boule immediately and retarded the other.) If you retard the loaves, allow an extra hour or two for proofing – about 4 hours from when you take them out of refrigeration until you bake them.


Forty-five minutes (or 45-60 minutes, if using a baking stone) before baking, pre-heat your oven to 480F with a sheet pan or baking stone in the oven. (Make sure your sheet pan is large enough to form a base for the cover you will be placing over the loaf. See below. I used a heavy-gauge black steel, non-stick sheet pan that is larger than the standard “half sheet” size.)


When the loaf is proofed, transfer it to a peel dusted with semolina or corn meal, load it onto your sheet pan or stone and immediately cover it with a stainless steel bowl that has been pre-heated with hot tap water. (Dump the water but do not dry the bowl just before loading the loaf in the oven.)


Bake for 15 minutes, then remove the bowl from the oven, close the door and lower the temperature to 450F. Bake for another 15-18 minutes until the loaf is nicely colored and its internal temperature is at least 205F. Turn off the oven and leave the door ajar with the loaf in it for another 5-10 minutes to dry the crust.


Cool the loaf on a rack completely before slicing.


 


The loaf that was baked without overnight cold retarding was much like a French pain au levain. Right after cooling, it was only very mildly sour and had a nice wheaty flavor. Thirty-six hours later, it had a more pronounced but still mild sourness. The flavors had melded and were improved, to my taste. As you can see, the crust was rather light-colored. There was almost no coloration at the point I removed the bowl. The boule had moderate oven spring but great bloom. This is typical of the results I get when I bake loaves covered in this manner. The crust was crisp, and the crumb was nice and open but chewy.


Susan from San Diego's SD boule


Susan from San Diego's Sourdough (Not cold retarded)



Susan from San Diego's Sourdough (Not cold retarded) Crumb


I baked the cold retarded loaf the next day. This time, I baked the loaf covered for the first 15 minutes, but on a baking stone rather than a sheet pan. Also, I preheated the oven to 500F then turned it down after loading the loaf. I baked at 450F for 30 minutes total, then left the loaf in the turned off oven with the door ajar for another 5 minutes.


As you can see, the second loaf had significantly greater oven spring. I think this was due to the hotter initial temperature and, maybe, the stone. Also, the crust is significantly darker, which I prefer in this type of bread.



Susan from San Diego's "Original Sourdough" baked after cold retardation.



Susan from San Diego's "Original Sourdough" baked after cold retardation - Crumb


This loaf had a crunchier crust and significantly more sour flavor than the loaf that had not been cold retarded. The crumb was chewy but maybe a bit less than the loaf baked the night before.  To my taste, this loaf was just about perfect - very close to my personal ideal sourdough bread. I bet it's going to be even better the next day.


Thanks Susan!


David


 


 

TeaIV's picture
TeaIV

this is my first Sourdough: (san fran SD, i think it was pretty good for a first time). All of the sourdough things that I baked I used with the starter that I grew with Sourdo Lady's recipe, using dulled lemon juice.


sorry for the blurry image...


This is my first Pizza... very Garlicky Pesto (home-made) with moz cheese, mushrooms and pine nuts. oh, and a cheese-filled crust! I love those! sadly this is taken pre-bake. It didn't last long enough to take a picture of it when it was ready. we were hungry that day...



 


and last but not least, My Sourdough Pizza. all I can say is it was Amazing... best pizza dough I've ever tasted... the toppings could have been better, but oh well. cheese filled crust again. this time I insisted that I take several pictures, but someone's hungry fingers were running towards the pizza already. both of these were using the pizza primer recipe on this site.


TeaIV's picture
TeaIV

I made baguettes with poolish using one of the recipes on this site, and It was delightful!! my family all agreed that this was some of the best bread I've made!



 


compare to my first try with baguettes:



Way better!

guan.xiu's picture
guan.xiu




The asian flavored sweet roll , made with butter,egg and sugar.


I don't know how to describe lots of recipes because of my poor English. Sorry about that.


 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I worked from home Wednesday and used it as an opportunity to refresh my starter and bake a couple of loaves.


The dough I made was a "little of this and that" dough.  I threw some leftover mashed potatoes in, the last couple of ounces of a bag of rye flour I had, a bit of whole wheat flour from another bag I needed to use up, and a couple of cups of AP flours.  I made the dough very wet, 70+ percent hydration.


I folded a few times throughout the morning and tried to shape a couple of freeform loaves in the early afternoon.  It was amazingly sticky.  No amount of water on my hands or flour on my board (or vice-versa) was working for me. 


After 10 minutes of sticking and swearing and being about ready to dump it into the compost, I dumped the gobs into a couple of loaf pans.  Two hours later, I came downstairs to the kitchen and was pleasantly surprised by how much it had risen in a loaf pan despite the way I had abused it.  So I baked them.



sourdough loaf


Not my most beautiful loaf, but pretty darned good.  I don't think anyone else but me could tell this was not what I'd intended to make.  And the sourdough flavor was tremendous: the extra abuse and longer rises let it develop more.

nosabe332's picture
nosabe332

I decided after a few sensible, somewhat alarmist, posts here on TFL that i would not buy unglazed flooring tiles (terracotta, saltillo, etc) for use in my oven. There are too many health concerns involved with the manufacturing and raw material differences between flooring tiles and bakeware. Any cause for concern should not be ignored. It's likely that flooring tiles could be perfectly fine to bake with. On the other hand, maybe not.


It helps that I'm getting a good amount of money back after taxes, which I decided to spend on a baking stone and other baking equipment. And to keep track of what I could get, I'm putting together this list:


Sur La Table, (Best Manufacturers) $42, 14x16x5/8


Old Stone, (via Amazon) firebrick, $29.95, 14x16x?


Breadtopia, Fibrament, $51, 13x17.5x3/4, $69, 15x20x3/4


Ace Mart, American Metalcraft, Corderite, $44, 14x16x1/2


Central Restaurant, Fibrament, $58.49, 15x20x3/4


 


i never thought i'd see the day that sur la table looked like an economic option!

ques2008's picture
ques2008

Finally got myself an inexpensive digital camera and would like to show off one of my "creations" which is far from original.  I'm sure many of you have made this danish ring.  I got this recipe from www.cookscountry.com/recipe.asp?recipeids=3846&bcd=46152.  Cooks Country is a great web site, by the way, and would like to know how many of you are members and whether or not you use your membership.  They seem to have a gold mine of knowledge with truckloads of practical advice.  I'm thinking of signing up.


Anyway, I'm showing pictures of the (1) preparation for the dough where I slather it with the filling, (2) the finished product and (3) the product partially gobbled up.  I halved the recipe, and didn't quite succeed with the cutting and the turning upside of each slice, but the recipe gives a step-by-step.  I'll try it again one day, and hopefully, get the technique right!


Picture 1:  Prepping the dough.


 prepping the dough


 


2.  Danish ring fresh out of the oven:


danish ring as it came out of the oven


3.  And now, as it was partially eaten (closer look of slices - as you can see I did not quite do the slices with flying colors!)


partially eaten ring


 


 

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