The Fresh Loaf

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Yippee's picture
Yippee

Bundt shape for a colleague's birthday, traditional for ourselves:


 


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157618022118071/

jj1109's picture
jj1109

So, as would be appropriate for a first post, a first for me: sourdough!


 


JJ's first ever sourdough


Now, to be honest, that tasted great. I've not baked (or even eaten) sourdough before, and the odour that came off whilst it was baking reminded me of *cough* baby vomit *cough* So I was apprehensive, before that first bite!


Not to worry though, it tasted great! I followed dmsnyder's post as the recipe (which in turn was creating Susan from SanDiego's original sourdough), except i had 500g of 100% hydration starter that was ready to go, so I used that. Also, my time constraints meant that it's easiest for me to make the dough last thing at night, and leave it for the first fermentation overnight (about eight hours) in my laundry, which, now it's Autumn (or Fall, take your pick) is around 15C overnight. Then shape it in the morning, dump it in the fridge and get my wife to take it out late afternoon for baking that evening.


I'll post up my following adventures in sourdough - this was 100% white starter, with the 50g of WW mentioned in the recipe. I've now baked two more sourdough efforts (over four days, I'm seeing how the flavour develops after sitting in the fridge for 24 hours after shaping), one with 25% WW starter and another tomorrow with 50% WW. 25% tasted amazing!


So, what prompted me to try this? I had a sourdough starter that I created from Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads, and with some advice from Wild Yeast. I mainly made it because I'm fascinated by the microbial side of it, and had an idea of getting some students to track the microbial population of the starter as it progressed... but no project students wanted to take it up :( (I work at a Uni)


My wife just purchased me a couple of pizza stones, and I'd just read about the magic bowl method. So I was eager to combine those two, and having the starter there convinced me to do this instead of a ciabatta or pain a'l'ancienne, which are on my list to do now!


Seems to have turned out well... as always it seems, too much baking and too little time :(


cheers


JJ

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Adapted from a friend's home recipe, made with mashed bananas.  Very moist and light interior. 


Used Trader Joe's white whole wheat flour for the first time.  Couldn't tell the difference between KA and TJ flours.


KA $5.99, TJ $2.99.


 


090515 follow-up observation:


This sandwich loaf was still extremely pillowy soft (without toasting) 4 days after it was baked. This was the most long lasting softness I've ever experienced among all the sandwich loaves I've baked.  Must be the enzymes in the banana doing the trick.   No more report on this loaf since the last slice was gone.   


 


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617984673373/


 


 



100% White Whole Wheat Banana Sandwich Bread    
The use of mashed banana significantly extends the keeping time of the loaf    
       
       
Adapted From KO's home recipe      
       
       
Water Roux Starter      
       
any amount is fine as long as bread flour (or whole wheat flour to make 100% WW) 50 g
the 1:5 ratio is followed water  250 g
       
  Whisk both until well mixed    
  Heat it up on stove, keep stirring     
  until temperature reaches 65 C or 149 F    
  (Yippee uses the microwave, about 4 minutes, stir halfway.)     
  (Final product should leave a trail when stirred.)    
  Put a plastic wrap directly on top to prevent forming a 'skin'.    
  Must be cooled to at least room temperature before use.    
  Refrigerate up to 3 days.      
  Do not use if turns grey.    
       
       
Makes 1 twin loaf (530g) plus about 4 - 5 rolls at 60g each    
       
A. whole wheat flour 332 g
  sugar  50 g
  salt 1 / 2 tsp
  yeast 8 g
  vital wheat gluten 2 1/4 TBS
B. whole eggs + milk  137 g
  water roux starter 106 g
  mashed ripe banana 50 g
C. unsalted butter 25 g
       
Knead: Combine A. and B. until a ball is formed.  Adjust by adding either flour or water 
  in small increments (1tsp ) to form the dough    
  Add C. and knead until the dough passes the windowpane test.  
       
1st Fermentation: About 40 minutes at 28 C or 82.4 F, 75% humidity    
       
Divide:  265g x 2 for the twin loaf, rest for rolls     
       
Relax: 15 minutes at room temperature    
       
Shape: twin loaf:    
  Deflate    
  Roll into an oval    
  With the long side facing you:    
  Fold 1/3 from top to bottom, press to seal    
  Fold 1/3 from bottom to top, press to seal    
  Turn seam side down    
  Roll and elongate the dough to about 30cm or 12 "     
  Upside down and roll into a cylindrical shape    
  Seam side down, into the loaf pan    
       
Final Proof: About 40 minutes at 38 C or 100.4 F, 85% humidity     
       
Bake: 350 F, 35-40 minutes    
  (Yippee applies whole egg wash before baking)    
Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

So I'm planting my garden this year for the first time at this house. A couple years ago, while I was pregnant with Rinoa, I had a few tomato plants and a few pepper plants that didn't do too well because they were in an area with poor soil and way too much other stuff. This year I'm tilling up the backyard, finally, and doing things right.


I've noticed that, when I'm pregnant, I'm more prone to excess than when I'm not. I'm not saying that I'm not prone to it normally. Who isn't prone to going to excess at *something* now and again? Usually, though, it's just been too much bread. Easily taken care of when used to feed the birds. This time...things are slightly different.


I went to Wal-Mart. I hate Wal-Mart normally. I prefer buying my stuff at the local grocery store, but I do like going to Sam's Club occasionally...but that's beside the point.


I should get to the point.


I went into their garden section hoping to find a few tomato plants that I liked.


I came home that day with 28 tomato plants and 3 lonely zucchini. I then went to Hy-Vee, one local grocery store, and picked up 12 bell pepper plants and 4 more tomatoes, 4 little yellow squash seedlings. Gonna go back after they mark down some of the more expensive plants and get a few more bell peppers, some cukes, probably some acorn squash, sugar snap peas, and probably some carrots and green beans as well.


The real concern, though, is tomatoes. 32 plants. Add to that the fact that they'll produce right through until my first frost if I let them.


I think I'm going to need some sauce recipes, among other things.


I've thought of sauce (pizza and marinara), drying, canning whole and diced, salsa (I'll have to borrow some jalepenos from a friend). Can't think of anything else to do with them all. Even if you count only 5-6 pounds of tomatoes from each plant (which is conservative, I've heard, with the types I bought)...that's a lot of tomatoes. Canning time comes right around when I'll be 8 months pregnant, too. At least I feel good by then.


Anyone else know what to do with an overabundance of tomatoes? Of course there's giving them away or selling them, and I'm considering that, but first I want to think about what I can do to put them by. May as well get my money's worth.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

My another 'first time' experience.  As always, I'm having fun while learning new skills and trying out new recipes.


It's a spiked dough retarded since Sunday. 


New technique applied:  Covering the bread with an inverted dutch oven while baking.


 http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157618023122996/

Susan's picture
Susan

A pretty loaf; more fluffy crumb and less sour than my Ultimate loaf, well-risen, excellent thinner crispy crust.  I suspect retarding overnight would increase the sour somewhat. 

60 grams 100% starter
180g water
300g high-gluten flour
6g salt

Mix starter and water, add flour and salt.  Mix until rough.  Cover and rest 10 minutes.  Fold from bottom to top around tub.  Cover and ferment until doubled (~7 hours@lower 70'sF).  Stretch and fold.  Let relax.  Shape and put in linen-lined colander until floured finger leaves an indentation (~2.5 hours).  Place in 530F oven, covered, for 10 minutes.  Reduce heat to 430F.  Remove cover at 20 minutes.  Continue baking for 12-15 minutes.  Turn off oven and leave for 10 minutes.  Cool on rack. 





Yippee's picture
Yippee

70% Whole Wheat Sesame Sandwich Bread    
Can be switched to 100% WW, but Yippee finds 100% WW too bitter    
       
Adapted From 'The 65 C Bread Doctor",  by Yvonne Chen    
       
       
Water Roux Starter      
       
any amount is fine as long as bread flour (or whole wheat flour to make 100% WW) 50 g
the 1:5 ratio is followed water  250 g
       
  Whisk both until well mixed    
  Heat it up on stove, keep stirring     
  until temperature reaches 65 C or 149 F    
  (Yippee uses the microwave, about 4 minutes, stir halfway.)     
  (Final product should leave a trail when stirred.)    
  Put a plastic wrap directly on top to prevent forming a 'skin'.    
  Must be cooled to at least room temperature before use.    
  Refrigerate up to 3 days.      
  Do not use if turns grey.    
       
       
Makes 2 loaves      
       
A. whole wheat flour 350 g
  bread flour (can be replaced entirely by ww flour) 130 g
  dry milk powder 140 g
  sugar (May reduce to 50g, Yippee uses more sugar to cover 90 g
  the bitter taste)    
  salt 7 g
  yeast 10 g
  vital wheat gluten 3  1/4 TBS
B. whole eggs 60 g
  milk 140 g
  water roux starter 120 g
C. unsalted butter 50 g
D. white sesame  50 g
  (Yippee washes the sesame, drain, and pat dry with paper towels after 10 minutes)
E. More white sesame for rolling the dough in    
       
Knead: Combine A. and B. until a ball is formed.  Adjust by adding either flour or water 
  in small increments (1tsp ) to form the dough    
  Add C. and knead until the dough passes the windowpane test.  
  Add D. at the last 5 minutes of kneading and knead slowly     
       
1st Fermentation: About 40 minutes at 28 C or 82.4 F, 75% humidity    
       
Divide:  into 2 pieces, each at about 450g     
       
Relax: 15 minutes at room temperature    
       
Shape: Shape like regular sandwich bread, 2 loaves    
  Roll the dough in sesame seeds.    
       
Final Proof: About 40 minutes at 38 C or 100.4 F, 85% humidity     
       
Bake: 350 F, 35-40 minutes    
  (Yippee applies whole egg wash before baking)    
Yippee's picture
Yippee

This slack dough was more difficult for me to shape  and the baguettes were deflated when I tried to transferred them from the baguette pan to the stone.  Need to figure out a better way to do this.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617904188161/

GabrielLeung1's picture
GabrielLeung1

I just recently succeeded in completing a mother starter and so I've started to use it to make some sourdough. The first set of loaves came out rather dull looking but tasted quite good.


The second use of the loaves were exceedingly different.


http://chausiubao.deviantart.com/art/Pain-au-Levain-122190327


The starter was 14 days old, I expect it will get even better as it matures

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I guess all the hard work and sleepless nights, even the dark circles under my eyes, are well worth it:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617903700219/

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