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Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is a 2nd shot at Hamelman's Whole wheat levain (sourdough 50% wholewheat), after improving my steaming technique.






 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...


Hey All,


Just wanted to share with you a project that I am working on...  So on 8/30/10, I took delivery of 75lbs of flour from King Arthur which I ordered because they were having a free shipping on certain items.  This included their AP flour along with their WW and White WW.  What to do, what to do...  So, I baked my first full sourdough bread without adding any yeast not too long ago: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19389/83010-sourdough-progress with great success as far as open crumb, and crackling crust...  The flavor was very good, but there was one person who thought it wasn't salty enough or something...  Anyways, back to this project...


The previous sourdough bread was based on a liquid levain (100% hydration) which is also the hydration of my storage starter...  So my bright idea was to convert my liquid starter to a partially whole grain stiff starter at around 55% hydration...


On 9/1/10 at around 10:20pm, I threw out about half of my liquid starter, kept a small portion of it and mixed it as follows:


200g AP (King Arthur)


100g WW (King Arthur


150g Water


100g liquid sourdough storage starter (100% hydration)


550g total stiff starter yield


10:20pm - Mix all, place in covered container, let rest on counter.


12:20am - Place in refrigerator


 


9/2/10 - Feed Stiff Levain Again (Starter Build #2)


200g AP


100g WW


150g Water


550g All of starter from the evening before.


1000g total stiff starter yield


9:00am - Mix all, knead into ball, place into covered container, place in refrigerator.


 


9/3/10 - Final Dough


600g AP


200g WW


200g White WW (KA)


700g Water


24g Kosher Salt


600g Stiff Levain


2324g Total dough yield


6:18pm - Take stiff levain out of refrigerator and let rest on counter.  Give the levain the float test.  Measure out all ingredients.



Stiff levain out of refrigerator.  Notice the bubbles.



With a wet spoon, cut out a piece of the stiff levain and place it in some water to see if it floats...  If it does, it's ready to use.  For more on the float test, please check out this link: http://www.farine-mc.com/2010/01/building-levain-la-gerard-steps-2-3-and.html  Note point A3.



Cut up levain into pieces, place in large mixing bowl along with the measured amount of water required for the recipe.



Premeasured flours.  Note that on the bottom is the AP flour, and on the top the WW flours.



Kosher salt



All the ingredients in the bowl.  Notice that on the bottom is the water and stiff levain.  Then the whole wheat flours, the AP flour, then last on top is the Kosher salt.  This sequence is very important, and will prevent the formation of lumps or dry clumps, and dry bits stuck to the side of the bowl.



Beginning the mixing at 6:57pm.  I am using a large plastic/rubber spatula.  This is the initial mixing which takes about 30 seconds.  You can pretty much keep the spatula stationary and move the bowl at this stage.  It is just to mix the wet ingredients with the dry ingredients.



This is probably about 1 minute of mixing.



A little more mixing.



Done mixing with rubber spatula... Now time to get wet and dirty with hands and water...



This is the dough after the following: make sure you have a bowl of water next to you...  Wet your hands and squish the dough in order to work out any lumps...  Then slap fold and roll two times.  This technique that I use is a hybrid of what Richard Bertinet does with in his sweet dough video, except I prefer to do it all in my mixing bowl to prevent getting my kitchen counter sticky and messy: http://www.gourmet.com/magazine/video/2008/03/bertinet_sweetdough


1.  Take the ball of dough by one end, let it stretch down using gravity.


2.  slap the bottom part of the dough into the bottom of the bowl.


3.  Fold the top part that you are holding into the center, and roll it into a ball in one forward motion.


4.  Rotate bowl 90 degrees and repeat.



Place entire bowl into large plastic bag, autolyse (rest) for 30 minutes...  Have a cup of coffee, tea, or beer...  I'm having beer...  Just as a note, these series of steps lasted from 6:57pm to 7:02pm, which is about 5 minutes out of your life...



Dough after 30 minute autolyse.



7:40pm - Dough after 2 slap, fold, and rolls...  Sorry for the blurry pictures.  Notice how much smoother the dough is...



Dough after about 10-15 slap, fold, and rolls...  Notice the dough tear at the bottom.  At this point when this happens, stop handling the dough, place it in plastic bag and wait for about 20-30 minutes.



8:00pm - This is the dough after the 20 minute rest, and 6 additional slap, fold, and rolls...  Place bowl in plastic bag, let rest for another 20 minutes.



8:20pm - This is the dough after the 20 minute rest.  Notice how it has spread out...



This is the dough after 2 slap, fold, and rolls...



Transfer to plastic tub lightly oiled with extra virgin olive oil.  I'm sure any sort of neutral cooking oil would work.  My tub is a 4L tub, which is the smallest tub you would probaby want to use for the amount of dough this recipe makes...



Top view.  Sorry for blurry...



Added plastic wrap before putting on top.  My containers don't seal all that great.  Plus, it's insurance if the dough pops the top in the fridge...



Place in to fridge...  40F to 45F...


9:25pm - Turn dough, return to fridge...



9/3/10 - The moment of truth...


I was at work for longer than I had intended today...  Argh!




5:00pm - Do I have magical dough, or a dough explosion?



Dough Explosion!!!



Release my cornichons!!!



Dough texture shot...  Looks well fermented...  Fingers crossed...



5:00pm - After I cut off the dried bit from the exploded part, I divided the dough and shaped them into boules weighing approx 1100g.  The dough shaped nicely without tearing...  More fingers crossed...  Now for proofing for about 2 hours...



Bannettons in plastic...


5:50pm - It's pretty warm right now... 85F in the kitchen...  Proofing going well.  Turned on oven with 2 stones, steam pan.  Preheat to 550F with convection for 45 minutes to 1 hr...




7:10pm - Take the baskets out of the plastic, give it the poke test, take the thermometer out of the oven, prepare one cup of water, locate oven mitt, lame, peel, cup of flour, turn convection off...



Slash as desired...



Peel directly on to baking stone, put oven mitt on, carefully pour one cup of water in steam pan, snap picture, close oven door, turn down to 450F without convection.  Bake 50 minutes, rotating half way...



This is one of them halfway through the bake.  I rotated them, and shifted them between the upper and lower stones...  25 more minutes of baking, and then a weight and temp check...  I'm shooting for 935g or less after bake weight which puts it at a 15% weight loss, which is good...


8:00pm - Weight and temp check...  Weight around 980g, and internal temp is around 200F...  I'm looking for 210F...  Bake for another 10 minutes...






Will post crumbshots tomorrow...  Enjoy!


Tim

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I baked some loaves for friends today and also a dozen of my 'Buns for Sandwiches' for this week-ends bar-b-que holiday.  I had to use my bottom oven for the buns.  It is not convection and the buns come out more evenly browned and bake a little faster in the convection oven setting.


The recipe for these delicious and Basic White Sourdough loaves with 100% hydration starter is HERE and the Buns for Sandwiches is http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17329/buns-sandwiches .


                                  



                                                                 ADDED this should read 100% 'Levain' hydration



                                            Delicious full of flavor with just the right amount of sourdough tang and sweet flavor at the end, that melts in your mouth.  Crusty, crunchy crust...my husband loves it and raves about the flavor..I must have hit his 'sweet spot' : )  I've also made this bread with added rye and it is also delicious...I have to say it... the all white is our favorite!


 


                                                                                 


 


            Have a great weekend!


                   Sylvia


                                             


 

abunaloaf's picture
abunaloaf

I have recently tried sourdough, and was really encouraged when on the second day I had bubbles.  My old earthenware crock was previously used to make saurkraut.  I put in one cup of strong bread flour, one cup of spelt and 2 1/2 cups of tepid tap water, covered it with a glass plate and left it to find yeast.


The starter smelled more yeasty and less sour after a week.  Instead of discarding starter when feeding I used it, but I have yet to get a loaf I am satisfied with.  I know how to make bread, so that is not an issue.  I have made the exact same bread weekly for many years,  But I have also learned a lot since I have become interested in trying variations.  Thanks for this site.


I let the dough rise twice before putting it in pans and it takes forever.  So two days ago I put my dough in the fridge overnight and put it into pans in the morning....The dough had some condensation and a bit of drying as well.  After all day in a proofing oven it was still having a hard time rising.  I sprayed it periodically with oil so it wouldn't dry out.  It turned brown after baking, even though I used mostly white flour. The end result was a flattish heavy loaf that tastes good, but I would like it to be lighter. That way I could put the saw back in the garage.  I think I will start adding a teaspoon of yeast so I get the taste without all the waiting. 


When doing research about how to go about doing this I noticed that some people start their sourdough with real yeast.  Is this a bad thing?

mauiman's picture
mauiman

 I have formed a loaf and set it aside to rise. But once risen, how do I transfer this slightly sticky body to a baking stone which I've left pre-heating in the oven?  Is there a time tested way to do this?

wassisname's picture
wassisname

 


Bagels, the perfect antidote to an overdose of sticky, tempermental sourdough ryes.  They may not be the prettiest bagels to ever come out of the kettle, but YUM!  I don't know why I didn't try these sooner.  These are going to replace english muffins as my "easy, little, single-serving bread" of choice... at least for a while.  The simple fact that there is nothing sticky going on makes them a breath of fresh air.


They are 100% whole wheat, straight out of Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads.  I didn't have any barley malt syrup, so I used dark, local honey, but I will definitely be picking some up for the next batch.


I'm eager to try different additions to the boiling-water.  For this batch I used baking soda and a little molasses just for the heck of it, but that didn't seem to get me a very bagel-like crust.  Not that I'm going for any kind of serious authenticity here!  Not really in my nature to stress about that, and besides, I wouldn't know an authentic bagel if it jumped out of the oven and sang "New York, New York."


-Marcus


breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

8/30/10 - 2 Stage Liquid Levain Sourdough Boules



So this is an interesting bread for me.  It's the first full sourdough bread of my official baking season.  It's still quite hot here in NYC, around 90F, so my kitchen is in the 80's...  I wasn't sure what to bake, but my sourdough starter needed feeding, so I figured what the heck.  So the starter was fed at 7:00pm, and it doubled in 2 hours.  I took out 200g of the refreshed starter, and fed it again as below, and it doubled in a little over 2 hours to my surprise...  So I made my dough as below, and fridged it, not expecting much...  In the morning when I woke up, it had doubled in the plastic containger (4L).  I gave it a turn, put it back into the fridge and went to work...  When I came home at 6:30pm it had hit the top of the container, and by 7pm, it had popped the top...  Now time to prepare to bake before a dough explosion happens...  Usually when I do these levain only breads, I'm sitting around waiting for it to do it's thing...  This time, I had to bake when it was ready...  Now!  Enjoy the pics...


8/30/10


Liquid Levain Stage 1


200g Storage starter @ 100% hydration


20g Organic wheat berries (freshly ground)


20g Organic spelt berries (freshly ground)


20g Stone ground rye flour (organic/fresh ground if possible)


40g Bread flour (Gold Medal)


100g Water


400g Total


 


7:00pm - Mix all, cover and let rest for 2-3 hours, or until doubled.


 


Liquid Levain Stage 2


200g Bread Flour


200g Water


200g Liquid levain stage 1


600g Total


 


9:00pm - Mix all, cover and let rest for 2-3 hours, or until doubled.


 


8/31/10


Final Dough


800g Bread flour (Gold Medal)


100g WW flour


100g Rye Flour


675g Water


24g Kosher Salt


600g Liquid levain stage 2


2299g Total dough yield


 


12:15am - Mix all into shaggy dough, cover let autolyse for 30 minutes.  Prepare oiled plastic tub.


12:45am - Turn dough using French fold method with wet hands and dough scraper in bowl  until dough smoothes out and tightens up.  Stop when gluten starts to tear (turn not more than 8-10 times).  Transfer to oiled tub, place in refrigerator at 40-45F.


1:25am - Turn dough, return to fridge.  Go to bed.


8:35am - Turn dough, return to fridge.  Go to work.


7:20pm - Take dough out of fridge, divide into 4 equal pieces, preshape... (576g approx)


7:30pm - Final shape into boule, place in banneton for proofing, cover with plastic.




8:30pm - Place baking stones in oven on 2 levels along with steam pan, preheat 550F with convection...


9:30pm - Turn convection off.  Turn boules out onto peel, slash as desired, place in oven directly on stone.  When all boules are in, pour 1 cup of water into the steam pan, close door, turn oven down to 450F.  Bake 45 minutes, rotating loaves between stones and positions halfway through bake.  Boules are done when internal temp reaches 205F or more.  Let cool completely before cutting (overnight).



Out of the oven, the boules weighed about 470g, which is about an 18% water loss, which is good.


I'll post a crumbshot tomorrow...


9/1/10 - Crackly crust



Crumb shot!



Breakfast!


GSnyde's picture
GSnyde


The Second Bake


As with the first batch of Sourdough I baked Saturday (with reasonable success), I tried to manipulate the fermentation time of the second batch to meet my schedule.  The starter was ready Saturday afternoon, and I mixed the flour and let it sit on the kitchen counter for several hours, before deciding that it was getting late and the dough wouldn’t get shaped, proofed and baked until Sunday.  So I put it in the Igloo cooler with Blue Ice overnight.  I misunderestimated the fermentation rate.  Sunday morning it was a good deal more than doubled (big d’Oh!).  


IMG_1436


David (surprisingly still patient with my questions) said it might be overfermented and wouldn’t proof well or achieve good oven spring.  Not surprisingly, he was right.


I found the dough very sticky, but didn’t want to over-flour the board this time and repeat my seam-sealing problems of the first batch.  So I wrassled with it and got a lot of it stuck to my hands (I used the d'Oh scraper).  Knowing that a frequent mistake is to over-react to an earlier mistake, I used a moderate amount of flour on board and hands in the folding and shaping.  I tried to be attentive to not overflouring the dough’s surface, and I got it about right.   Having reviewed Floyd’s batard-shaping video again, I did a better (not great) job of shaping batard-shaped batards.  The seams were well-sealed.


IMG_1438


They rose little in proofing, and got little oven spring.  The shape and crust look pretty good.  On these loaves, I again suffered from the lack of a proper scoring tool.  I tried various implementss--sharp paring knife, grapefruit knife, very sharp bread knife, gas-powered weed-whacker [j/k about that last one].  Did I mention I need a lame? I ordered one today.


IMG_1441


As you can see, compared to the loaves from the day before, there was very little oven spring.


IMG_1443]


And the crumb was dense and heavy, underbaked.  To put a positive spin on it, I’m calling it very chewy.


IMG_1455


I suppose I could find a use for these.  I might take up carving duck decoys (but my charming spouse thinks they won't float).


On the bright side, I got very good broiler spring on our omelet yesterday morning.


IMG_1445]


And the toast made from Saturday’s bake was crispy and delicious.


IMG_1447


 


Lessons Learned


From 10 hours perusing TFL, many conversations with Brother David, and a weekend of fumbling and bumbling, I got two pretty good loaves and two roughly-batard-shaped paper weights.  So what lessons have I learned from all the d'Oh! moments?  There are too many to count.  But the main ones are:


(1) You can manipulate rising time to fit your schedule, but sometimes you waste good dough doing so (it's not a waste of time if you learn from it). 


(2) Read lots of experienced people’s writings on a technique (or, better yet, watch videos) before you try it.  You’ll still mess up, but not as bad, and you’ll have a better idea what you did wrong.


(3) Some of the axioms bakers talk so much about are really important (use the proper tools, follow the recipe, shape the loaf just so), but the most important one is to stay in touch with the dough and read its signals.


(4) However much I learn, there’s still way more to learn than I know.


Sorry for the long post, but I needed to experiment with blog posting, too.


I plan to get better at both.


Glenn

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is the most successful Wholewheat multigrain i have baked so far. The Steaming technique this time was different. I drilled a whole through the roaster Lid and purchased a steamer cleaner to push steam through the hole. This was adapted from The baker steamer set that was marketed in TFL years back, but with much cheaper components.


The result was spectacular: the loaf gained color so fast, and the crust was crispy out of the oven. Oven spring was very good too. I left the loaf in the roaster for 20 minutes (should have been less: the bottom got charred).











If it wasn't for the charred bottom, i'd say , this is the one best tasting / looking bread i have ever tasted in my life.


Khalid

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