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Dresden Christmas Stollen

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nellapower's picture
nellapower

Dresden Christmas Stollen

I have been lurking in the forum for over two years now, soaking up all that I could about sourdough bread-baking. All this time, I wished there was something that I could give back, that I could share with the community. Seeing that I am still a bread amateur compared to you guys, I thought I will have to wait a few more years for this blessed moment. But today, as I was getting my kitchen ready for baking, it hit me. There actually is something I can share with you: my recipe and my experience with baking Dresden Christmas Stollen. I know, there is already one recipe around by harrygerman. My recipe is similar, but with even more butter and fruit. This stollen is an amazing thing: rich, heavy, and fruity. The dough is different from anything else I know and a little tricky to work with. Before I give you the recipe and the technique, I will start by telling you a little about the history of Dresden Stollen. Seeing that there are very different stollen recipes around, I think you need this little introduction to understand how the Dresden stollen is different and why it is worth making, despite all the effort.

In Saxony (the region in the East of Germany, where Dresden is), stollen has been a tradition Christmas bread for centuries (the first written documents about stollen are from the 1329). At that time, however, stollen was a light, yeasted bread, containing nothing but flour, water, yeast and sometimes oil. It was sold and eaten during he pre-Christmas period of Advent fast. Saxony was then catholic, so the use of any richer ingredients such as butter or milk was strictly forbidden. The Saxon rulers, however, were apparently dissatisfied with their Advent bread, so they applied to the pope for a permission to use butter in their stollen. The pope allowed this in 1491, on the condition that they atone for their sin by donating liberally to the church. Although meant only for the rulers and gentry, the pope's permission was quickly applied with much more liberation. Maybe to compensate for centuries of butter-free fasting, the Saxons transformed the stollen into a rich, buttery bread stuffed with fruits. No longer a fast meal, the stollen became a Christmas celebration bread. After a while Saxony turned protestant, but the stollen remained. Of course, with its centuries of tradition, the title "Dresden Stollen" was soon used for trading purposes, unfortunately not always with high-quality products. Since the beginning of the 20th century, the traditional Dresden stollen bakeries fought against the on-slough of so-called Dresden stollen. Today, "Dresdner Stollen" is a registered trademark and only selected backers from Dresden area can use it, provided that their stollen meet criteria with regard to the minimum amount of butter and dried fruits.

Enough of history, let's look at the bread. A real Dresden stollen contains at least 500g Butter and 650g sultanas per 1000g flour. This makes it extremely heavy and rich. Furthermore, the stollen is traditionally heavily coated in icing sugar. The bread needs to ripe for at least 3 weeks in order to develop its flavours and texture and keeps in proper conditions easily for several months. I have started baking stollen some ten years ago, when I moved to Dresden. I now bake 2-3 batches each year before Christmas. For my husband, stollen is something to look forward to throughout the whole year. Even when we spent six month in Finland last year, there was no questions that I will bake his beloved stollen. The recipe that I have here is based on a century old recipe for Dresden Christmas stollen, that Dresden bakeries use as a foundation. Of course, I have adapted it to suit our tastes. You are free to do the same. Just what ever you do, do not cut down the fat! Without the fat, the stollen will never keep as long and it will not develop the proper texture and taste. The same goes for the amount of fruits. You can play with the sugar though, for example leave out the sugar coat (I prefer our stollen uncoated).

Right, enough said, here is the recipe:

Ingredients:

1000 g flour (fine, weak flour; all purpose flour should do nicely)
250 g cream
42 g fresh yeast (or 14 g dried yeast)
500 g butter (or 450g butter and 50g lard or tallow)
1 g ground mace
0,5 g ground cinnamon
0,5 g ground cardamom
zest of 1 lemon
150 g sugar (I use Muscovado whole-cane sugar)
50 g candied lemon peel (instead I make my own by soaking peel from two lemons in honey
for several days)
150 g candied orange peel (instead, I soak peel from 4-5 oranges in honey)
500 g sultanas
250 g currants
100 g rum (optional, I use Amaretto instead)
200 g ground almonds
+ extra butter (approx. 250 g)
+ extra fine castor sugar (approx. 100 g)
+ extra icing sugar (at least 250 g)

0. Save the date
It's important not to start baking stollen too late. My personal experience with this recipe is that they need at least 4 weeks, ideally 6 weeks before you cut into them. Really! We always cut our first stollen on the first Advent Sunday, so I bake my first batch 10 weeks before Christmas. I bake my second and sometimes third batch about 5-6 weeks before Christmas, partly for us and partly as presents for friends.

0. Preferment
The stollen dough is very heavy and it will need a strong yeast activity to raise it. For this purpose, I like to preferment a portion of the flour. I take 300g of the flour, break in 21g yeast, and knead it with 250g cream. I leave it to ferment for 1 hour by room temperaure and than for 12-24 hours in the fridge. You can also use sourdough in the preferment. I have successfully baked sourdough-only stollen, you just need to let them rise longer.

0. Soaking
Place the sultanas and currents in a large bowl. If you are using alcohol, pour it over the fruit. Add enough boiling water to cover the fruit. Leave to soak for at least 30 minutes, but best over night. It is important to soak the fruit even if you are not using alcohol, or else it will burn in the oven. Don't forget to drain the fruit well before you start making the dough to make it as dry as possible.

1. Dough
I sieve the flour onto a working surface (this definitely does not work in a bowl). Break in the remaining 21g of yeast (you can leave this out, just adjust the rising time). Rub the lemon zests into the sugar and mix the sugar into the flour, together with the mace, cinnamon, and cardamom. If you are wondering about the small amounts, the stollen is not supposed to taste very spicy. However, this is your stollen, so you can add any spices you like. Cut the preferment into small pieces and distribute it on the edges of your flour mound and do the same with the butter/lard. Now comes the kneading. Be warned, that you will need about 30 minutes to knead the dough. You can try it in your mixere, but make sure your mixer can take it. Better invest the time or coax a physically strong friend or relative into helping. Start by taking a few pieces of the preferment and the butter and kneading them together. As you do this, the dough-lump in your hands will turn sticky. Place it in the middle of your flour mound and knead it there, until so much flour has been incorporated that it's dry again. Now take some more preferment and butter and knead them in your lump. This will make it sticky again, so add flour. And so on and so on. At some point, the dough-lump may become difficult to handle. Feel free to cut and put aside about two thirds of it and continue kneading with the rest. You can put the pieces together in the end. Do not be tempted into adding more flour or any liquids. Trust me, just keep kneading, it will all be well in the end. As you work, the kitchen will be slowly filled with the smell of lemon zest and the spices - Christmas is on the way!



2. Fruits
You are tired, your fingers ache and you are a proud owner of a homogeneous dough lump that reminds you of short-bread dough. Congratulations, let's add the fruit. Take your drained sultanas and currants and mix them with the ground almonds. This will help soak up the remaining liquid. Mix them with the candied orange and lemon peel and pour the whole lot on your working surface. You might have the urge to check the recipe now, because you think you have too much fruit. But it really can be incorporated into you dough-lump. First, cut the dough-lump into 5 pieces. Start by working the first piece into the fruit. As the fruit is wet, this will make it all turn into a strange paste. Keep adding piece by piece, until the whole lot is incorporated. Don't worry if you feel more like making mudpies. Place the whole mass into a bowl and clean your working surface with a dough scraper. Now evaluate the dough. Is it like a soft short-bread or cookie dough? Than you are done with it. If it's too wet and soft (probably it will be), dust the working surface with flour, turn the dough onto it and carefully work in a little more flour. Not too much, though, the dough should be just about manageable. You won't need to make anything fancy with it, so as long as it does not stick to the work surface or your hands like crazy, it's fine.



3. Divide, form, and rise
Divide the dough into 2-5 pieces. For us, I prefer to make two large stollen. This size apparently has a positive influence on the texture of the stollen later on. But you can make several smaller stollen, too, for example as gifts. Just don't forget to adjust the baking time. Form each stollen into a rough, high log. Just pat it into shape - no rolling, no stretching. Just a note here: the traditional Dresden stollen has no almond paste inside. With all the dried fruit and its sugar coat, I also think that it does not need it. But it's your stollen, so if you like, add it now. Put the formed stollen on a baking sheet with baking paper (make sure the stollen are far enough apart) and let it rise for about 2 hours (more, if you are using only sourdough or less yeast). The stollen will become a little puffy, nothing more. It will definitely not double.

4. Score and bake
There is a traditional way of forming a Dresden stollen. I use a different, simple way used for stollen from Thuringia (another region in Germany). It's easier and the stollen are less flat, so they are also moister. Basically, you just make a log and then you score it with a single cut all the away down the stollen's back. That's it. I score the stollen directly before putting it into the oven. I don't preheat the oven, just pop it in and bake it at 180°C for approx. 1-1,5 hours. Keep a watchful eye on the stollen. Cover it with aluminium foil if it has turned brown before its time and adjust the time according to the size of the stollen.


5. Coat
This is an optional step. Traditional stollen is heavily coated in sugar. If you want to  coat the stollen, brush it with liquid butter (as much as the stollen can soak up) immediately after taking it out of the oven. Than sprinkle it heavily with fine castor sugar. The castor sugar will soak up any access butter. Wait for the stollen to cool and sprinkle it with a very thick layer of icing sugar. As I wrote, I skip this step. Firstly, I find the coated stollen too sweet and secondly it makes a mess when storing. Alternatively, it is also possible to store uncoated stollen and brush it with butter and coat it in sugar right before cutting into it.

6. Store
The stollen has to be stored for at least 4 weeks (I recommend 6) before cutting into it. If you cut it earlier, you will be disappointed. Cutting it later is even better. Stollen store best in an old fashioned cool celler, with high humidity. If you don't have such a cellar, you can store stollen outside in wooden boxes provided that your climate is cool enough (that's what I do). Otherwise store the stollen in the coolest room of your house, but not in the fridge. Some people like to freeze the stollen, I don't think its necessary and it has a negative impact on the texture. If you are storing stollen in a cellar or outside, simply wrap it in cotton cloth and put it in a wooden box, so that it can breathe. Otherwise wrap it well in a plastic or aluminium foil. The idea is that if you cannot provide an environment with high humidity, such as cellar or outside, you should prevent the stollen from drying out. That's it, now wait.

7. Eating
If you cut into a stollen 2-3 weeks after baking, you will be disappointed. It will taste fine, but the crumb will be far too dry. Don't give up and put the stollen away again and wait a little longer. The texture will change over time and after six weeks it will have a short-bread-like crumb and the taste will be a mixture of spices and fruits, all rolled into a buttery, sweet bliss.

So to sum up, a Dresden stollen is not hard to bake. All it takes are good quality ingredients, some muscle and a lot of patience. The reward is a truly unusual bread. Although I am not German and grew up baking other Christmas goodies, stollen has become to me a personification of Christmas. You take the best, you do your best, you wait for the occasion, and then you enjoy it in full.

I hope someone might have a go at my Christmas stollen. I'll be happy to help you.

Best, Nella

Comments

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

You take the best, you do your best, you wait for the occasion, and then you enjoy it in full.

Great thoughts for holiday baking and for life in general! Making this on Stir up Sunday along with steaming the Plum Pudding will have them both ready for enjoying for Christmas family gatherings. I sense the beginning of a new tradition for my kitchen.

I've made stollen for so many years that people kind of expect receiving one the week of Christmas. This year though with your pictures and clear directions they will be in for a bigger treat than ever. Thank you for sharing your recipe and procedures.

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Thanks for your kind note. I am glad to hear you like my recipe. Let me know if you should need any more information - it feels good to share.

GermanFoodie's picture
GermanFoodie

I'm originally from Germany and I thought I had a good recipe, but I'll totally have to try yours. Thanks for posting this!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Your recipe!  Lovely to have a recipe from the baker who lives, where it originated.  It looks delicious!

Sylvia

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Nella,

What a great write up!  I have been wondering what to bake for friends this year and this recipe just might have to be tried out though I don't know if I have the patience you have with kneading.  What a monumental task!  

Can this be made with honey instead of sugar?

Again, thanks for the posting and also for the pictures to go alone with your words.

Take Care,

Janet

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Hi Janet,

yes, I have baked the stollen with honey before. It adds a little extra moisture, so you might have to use more flour, but then moisture is always variable in this recipe depending on how much the dried fruit soaks up. The stollen will also brown faster in the oven, so you will have to be extra watchful and cover it earlier. If you have ahoney with intensive taste, it will complement the other tastes, but don't expect it to be very present.

I also think that the stollen would be interesting with fine whole-wheat flour (like whole-wheat pastry flour) - in combinations with all the butter and dried fruits, I think that would make a very rustic fruit-bread. But I could never get past my husband with this idea :-).

Best, Nella

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Nella,

Thanks for the reply about the honey.  If I bake this I will let you know how it turns out...

Janet

candis's picture
candis

up until now I've thought it was absurd to think about it yet, but your wonderful recipe has inspired me to get started. thank you for the history too. 

 

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

Welcome Nellapower.

I made stollen last year but I'd love to try this recipe this year.

FF

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

my dear Omi worked weeks ahead to make hers just perfect - and they were !

Thank you, Nella.  Writing out this beautifully detailed recipe and enriching it with photos was truly a labor of love. 

Fröhliche Weihnachten !

Anna

 

EvaB's picture
EvaB

the cream mentioned is it heavy whipping cream 33-35% butter fat, or thinner table cream 18% butterfat, I won't even mention the half and half at 10% since I am sure that is too light! My instincts are to go with heavy whipping cream but would hate to mess up!

nellapower's picture
nellapower

I use heavy cream with around 30% fat. I think lighter creams would work as well, since I know some recipes call simply for milk. If you use lighter cream or milk, you might have to use a little less, as it contains less fat and more liquid.

EvaB's picture
EvaB

I would think the higher the fat content the more tasty the stollen would be, I always find that using full high fat cream in things makes a better tasting result. The only problem with that is the screams from the no fat-low fat proponents. Too bad its for Christmas, and I love the thought of stollen and will have to try making some!

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

with this stollen. It's extremely rich and surely delicious. Thanks for sharing, Nelly. At the moment I'm drooling.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

lemon and orange peel in honey.   How thin do you cut the rind and how long do you immerse this in honey, and would I have to do anything else ?

Thanks much,

Anna

 

EvaB's picture
EvaB

Was just reading in an old Fanny Farmer cookbook, about making peel and so forth. They suggest boiling the peeled off peels (quarter the peel and remove in large pieces) in water for about 10-15 minutes, and then let cool enough to handle and peel the white stuff off using a spoon to separate it from the coloured rind. Then you slice the peel in shreds or small dice and candy as normal. Which involves boiling in sugar syrup for 10 minutes, soaking in the syrup overnight, reboiling, resoaking and so forth until its to the stage you think is good. The sugar syrup would be replaced by a honey syrup, and the boiling and soaking are what puffs the thin rinds up.One thing though, wash the peels before peeling the fruit, since that is where the most stuff is on fruit, and scrub it hard because they put a wax over the peel, and that holds all the bad stuff in.

That nasty bitter stuff is actually really good for you, it contains the most trace elements and things like rutin which are replaced these days by vitamin supplements instead of being eaten. Bitters are good for your liver, hence things like Swedish bitters, and Jagermeister herbed alcohol drinks.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

another great way of making the candied peel !  However, I will still forego the bitter part- but hoisting a Jaegermeister sounds great, especially while making the Stollen. :)

anna

EvaB's picture
EvaB

My brother is the one who intorduced Jagermeister to me, and while its interesting and ok, not my tipple of choice. I'm afraid I like my alcohol like my coffee unadulterated with anything including ice. So herbed alcohol is ok, but not up there on my list. Same with spiced rums, and Bombay Saphire gin, ok for a change but prefer to drink the stuff plain.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

fatty goose-laden Christmas dinner, for medicinal purposes only, of course.  :)

Anna

 

EvaB's picture
EvaB

that is what its for, to help your liver process the fat! I do like goose but its so difficult to get a nice one, and to get anyone else to eat it, my uncle got one, once for my mother to cook and she wound up with a quart of goose grease from the pan, she was happy and used it for suspending turpentine in for rubbing on chests! Worked a treat too, you didn't have bad chest colds if she rubbed it on you, they left in a hurry! Germs just couldn't survive the goose grease and turpentine treatment.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

on still-warm sourdough bread  ;) 

 

EvaB's picture
EvaB

but have been known to come down to it. Each to his own as mother would say, the family tradition was bacon grease on bread of biscuits, never was fond of that either, but then again, I picked all the fat off my bacon! LOL I was a sore trial to my poor mother, didn't like bread, didn't like fat, didn't like peanut butter!

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

entry

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

porridge for you :)

nellapower's picture
nellapower

That's right, real candied peel needs to be boiled in sugar syrup. The peel I make is different - more orangey/lemoney but less sweet. Depends on what you prefer.

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Hi Anna,

I peel the oranges and lemons with a potato-peeler, so they are quite thin. I know that some peel it just like you would peel a normal orange. I haven't tried that yet, because I am not sure if it would not be bitter. Then I cut the peels in small pieces (you can also run them through a food processor) and mix them well with honey, so that the peels are well covered. Than I keep them in the fridge for a week before using them, but they can be also kept longer.

Best, Nella

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

potato peeler, don't want to include that nasty bitter white stuff.

Appreciate it!

anna

jolvista's picture
jolvista

this a link to really good candied orange peel:

http://www.calabriafromscratch.com/?tag=candied-orange-peels

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

jolvista.  I noticed that organic oranges are recommended. Makes good sense.

Thank you very much,

Anna

 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

but want the flavor of rum, amaretto, wine, etc.  I found this informative chart:

A study conducted by the US Department of Agriculture’s Nutrient Data Laboratory calculated the percentage of alcohol remaining in a dish based on various cooking methods. The results are as follows:

 

Preparation MethodPercent of Alcohol Retained
alcohol added to boiling liquid & removed from heat85%
alcohol flamed75%
no heat, stored overnight70%
baked, 25 minutes, alcohol not stirred into mixture45%
baked/simmered, alcohol stirred into mixture: 
  • 15 minutes
40%
  • 30 minutes
35%
  • 1 hour
25%
  • 1.5 hours
20%
  • 2 hours
10%
  • 2.5 hours
5%

 

Now, it may be that the amount of alcohol in a dish is modest to start with, but the fact that some of the alcohol remains could be of significant concern to recovering alcoholics, parents, and others who have ethical or religious reasons for avoiding alcohol. 

Anna

nellapower's picture
nellapower

The alcohol is definitely optional in the recipe. i have done it with and without. Yes, Amaretto (or Rum) adds a great flavour, but the stollen will taste good without it, too. You can use rum essence if you like or you can boil off your rum or amaretto before adding it to the soaking liquid.

lumos's picture
lumos

This is very useful chart. I've always wondered how much alcohol remains in cakes after baked.  Thank you for posting this, Anna! :)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:)      I think after the cake stands for weeks, more of the alcohol will evaporate.  I still would not serve it to anyone with alcohol issues.    Is it salt free butter in the recipe?

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

Really enjoyed your write-up, and it's always great to have a truly authentic recipe from the place of origin. We're approaching summer in my part of the world, so I might have to mark your recipe down for mid-year next year. Whenever, I look very forward to trying it. From your pics, it looks truly spectacular, and I bet it's got flavour to match!

I spent a year in Germany way back in the mid-80s and was knocked out by the wonderful German breads and baked goods (and the cakes, always served with a bowl piled high with fresh whipped cream!), so I can imagine your stollen is a superb Christmas treat.

Alles gute

Ross

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

before wrapping them until Christmas, I had a smidgen.   Hmmmmmm  goooood  :)

Anna 

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Hi Anna, I'm glad you already like it. Now comes the waiting time - my husband is already prowling along my stollen box and trying to negotiate an earlier date for trying it :-).

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Almost have gathered everything for the baking but have a couple of questions. My scale doesn't seem to be accurate for tiny amounts. Does anyone have a chart that would convert the yeast, mace, cinnamon and cardamom to volume? Also would it be best to use the osmotolerant yeast? Guess it was more than a couple of questions because I still need to ask about how fine to grind the almonds.  Thanks in advance for your help.

14 g dried yeast

1 g mace

.5 g cinnamon

.5 g cardamom

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

scale and poured 1 gram, then used 1/2 of that.

 

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Great idea. So far the only one I thought of was to weigh something like flour or water and then add the spices beside the container to increase .5 grams. Your idea makes more sense. Thank you.

nellapower's picture
nellapower

I tried to convert the spices and yeast for you. I came up with approx. 2g dried yeast per teaspoon. The spaces were all about 1.5g per teaspoon. I am unfortunately not familiar with osmotolerant yeast - when I use dried yeast, I just take the regular sort I can buy in any supermarket. Generally, I try to use fresh yeast. The almonds are ground into a meal. You can use almonds with or without skin - I use the unskinned ones.

SarahN's picture
SarahN

Excellent post! I've enjoyed baking sourdough Stollen for the past couple of years, but have never kept one for longer than a week. After reading your post, however, I'm keen to try a properly matured authentic Dresden Stollen. I certainly noticed the improvement in flavour and texture after just one week.

Can you tell me how you made your sourdough-only version? I'm wondering how to substitute sourdough starter for the yeast in your recipe without adding too much liquid? I normally use about 2 cups of starter @ 100% hydration for a recipe with 500g of flour, so when I had a go at your recipe today (half quantities), the dough was much wetter than it should be and I had to add more flour.

Thanks,

Sarah

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Hi Sarah,

the only liquid in the dough are 250ml of heavy cream (which for sourdough I replaced with milk) that goes into the preferment. What I did was replace the preferment with a sourdough milk-based sponge. I built the sponge in two steps. For the first step I took about a teaspoon of starter and mixed it with 50g flour and 50ml milk and let it sit for about 12 hours. I then added 250g flour and 200ml milk, kneaded, and let the mixture sit for another 12 hours. You can skip the first step and start with about 100g starter at 100% hydration, if you like. I keep a rye starter, so I didn't want to get too much rye flour into the dough. I then went on with the recipe as described, without adding any further yeast. I let my stollen rise longer - for 6-8 hours, depending on the temperature of the house.

I hope this helps.

Best, Nella

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Nella, we enjoyed the Stollen the second Sunday of Advent. From the fresh, bread like Stollen we were used to, the Dresden Stollen has grown into a soft, almost crumbly, delicate loaf of goodness! Gave one away soon after baking, thought this one would last until Christmas but it is so good I don't think there is much chance of that. Thank you again for the recipe, especially taking the time to write out such clear directions.

nellapower's picture
nellapower

I'm glad to hear the recipe works for you :-). We are also already enjoying our stollen from the first batch.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I usually bake either Mohnstollen, our favorite, or the Whole Wheat Stollen from Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads". It is made with sourdough and tastes very good.
You can always substitute up to 10% of the white flour with whole wheat without any liquid adjustments. If you want to use more you have to adjust the liquid a bit, and the bread will be a bit denser. But it sure will taste good, especially if you work with long fermentation.
Karin (originally from Hamburg)

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Hi Karin,

what a great idea with the Mohnstollen -  I havent't baked it for years. Just to clarify (as stollten means different things to different people), in Dresden Mohnstollen is a form of poppy seed swirl bread, but with loads and loads of poppy seeds. It's also eaten a here around Christmas time. A nice version of this is also the Hungarian Beigli -  I might even try and post a recipe here, as I recently acquired one from my husband's grandmother.

I have never tried substituting whole wheat into the stollen (that would be a capital offence in our household), though I have been wondering about it for some time. With all the fruit, the stollen should actually go quite well with a whole wheat, maybe even with some nuts as a sort of fruit bread.

Thanks for your ideas!

Best, Nella

sweetbird's picture
sweetbird

Nella,

If your stollen is anywhere near as delightful as your writing and excellent photos, it will be a treat worth waiting for! For over 30 years I've made a variation of the Christmas Stollen in Anna Thomas's original Vegetarian Epicure, and we look forward to it all year, but I may have to add your stollen recipe to my family tradition this year. It looks so lovingly hand-crafted and delicious and is incredibly tempting. Thank you for posting this!

(Of course, it's a bit late to start now for Christmas eating -- I missed it when you first posted it in October -- but I see no harm in a Happy New Year stollen!)

Janie

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Hi Janie,

I'm glad you like the post. There is definitely nothing wrong with a New Year stollen. I have even heard of families who kept one stollen till Easter. And if you do have some leftovers, they can be crumbled, mixed with some rum, cream and butter and made into a sort of cookie-balls.

Best, Nella

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

for Thanksgiving and it was absolutely delicious, maybe a touch dry but I sinned and had one slice with butter.  I researched Stollen baking some more and one recommendation was to go ahead and do slather melted butter and powdered sugar over the top before wrapping and storing for a few weeks. I know somewhere here we discussed holding off on the "icing" until ready to eat, but the recommendation stated that putting the icing on right away would stave off the drying-out. 

Anna

nellapower's picture
nellapower

Hi Anna,

using the icing, the time it's put on and even the amount are really a matter of personal preference. I like my stollen without, but my colleagues at work are all into a well-powdered stollen, ideally with a good piece of almond paste inside :-). I tried both versions and personally found that the butter and sugar had little effect on moisture, this seems to depend on the storage. Almond paste seems to add some moisture. Some also suggest putting the stollen for the final week into a closed box with a few apple slices - that's the same method as for making gigngerbread cookies softer. And I wonder what would happen, if the stollen was laced with rum similar to a fruit cake...

I hope you enjoy the stollen :-).

Best, Helena

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