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ph_kosel's picture
ph_kosel

I went on a shopping trip today here in Sacramento, visiting some bakeries I've never been to before and fetching esoteric flours I can't get at my neighborhood grocery.


Here's what I bought where, and what I thought of it:


1.  A baguette from Freeport Bakery on Freeport Blvd (Tasted like day old bread made with cake flour, weightless squishy stuff, didn't care for it at all!)


2.  A loaf of Deli Rye with caraway seeds from The Bread Store on J Street (A beautiful nearly spherical loaf, chewy and delicious, loved it!)


3.  A loaf of Vollkornbrot 100% rye with sunflower seeds from Grateful Bread Co. on Fair Oaks Blvd (A nice, very dense rectangular loaf, very chewy and delicious, loved it!)


4.  Dark Rye Flour from the bulk foods section of Winco Foods on Sheldon Road (I use this because it's the cheapest rye flour I've found in Sacramento where rye flour isn't found in most grocery stores.  The only problem is Winco's plastic bags tend to leak.)


5. Golden Temple brand Durum Atta Flour from the import section back in the "vegetables" aisle of Food Maxx on Florin Road (Haven't used it yet, 10 bucks for a 20-lb sack is a great price and it smells delicious!)


I also stopped at Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op on Alhambra Blvd at S Street.  The only rye flour they had was dark rye and their price was a tad higher than Winco's.


I'll try to post pictures of the loaves I bought tomorrow.

dancer742's picture
dancer742

I used to have a recipe for Honey WW Bread that contained molasses and honey and raised in the fridge overnight.  Any one have that recipe?  The honey, molasses, margerine was heated in water until warm.  It also called for powdered milk.  I later converted this recipe to have 12 grain cereal and sunflower seeds.  It was delicious.

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Ingredient List for TFL Bakers



A previous blog:
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22562/sourdough-crackers


If you are one of the TFL members already on my Applications list, new application was already sent to you. If you are not on that list, and could use a free spreadsheet calculator for determining the Calories, Grams, and Ounces for the amounts you enter on any of 155 existing ingredients entries, as well as the option for you to edit the existing information, and space for you to add to the list in any of the 45 remaining blank slots, then you might want to look at the sample PDF file, which I placed on Google Doc:https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0B_MScoZfDZkwNTI4NWJjOWMtNzQwZS00YWU1LWJlZWQtMGZiN2I0Njg0ZWU0&hl=en


I generate many programs for my own needs. If they seem like others might find them of use, I have been placing them in Public Domain and sending copies to those that have previously requests any of those that I have given copies to in the past.


If, after looking at the PDF example of the spreadsheet, and if you have Open-Office, or Excel, then I will e-mail you copies, if you request them. To do so, simply e-mail me with " TFL Apps " as the Subject Line. That is all you need do, I will e-mail you copies, and add you to the list. The list is only for these free applications, and updates, etc. I maintain the list myself and for no other purpose. I will also remove your name at anytime request me to do so, with no reason necessary to be given.


You can e-mail me at:
Ron@ronray.us


 

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde


Brother David and his wife Susan are traveling back to Fresno after a weekend in the Bay Area to see our visiting brother Aaron from Colorado.  So with the two locals, we had 80% of the Snyder siblings in one place.  That place, of course, was well-provisioned with baked goods, and we had a very nice brunch at Sister Norma’s apartment in Oakland. 


In the spirit of culinary science and the anthropology of family ritual among the California natives, we studied the question: “How many Snyders does it take to make a table full of baked goods disappear? “  The answer is “more than four”.  Now, this was not a proper scientific experiment, as we did not have a control group.  Just our out-of-control group.  Still, the procedures would be worth repeating to gather further data.


We did not photograph the experiment, as we did not want the recording of the event to affect the behavior of the subjects.  I can provide links to previous descriptions of the treats that lured the rats through the maze.


David brought his famous banana bread (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22727/praise-crust-amp-crumb), a Hamelmanian rye bread  (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22773/rye-bread-tips-and-tricks-applied), and the somewhat bizarre, but not really objectionable, Greek Saints’ Bread (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22790/artos-greek-saints039-day-bread-kassos). 


I brought my latest attempt at “Mai Tai Scones”, somewhat like the ones described here (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21496/people-who-live-glass-houses-shouldn039t-stow-scones) and some pistachio-golden raisin scones, using the same basic recipe but without alcoholic flavors.


As with most ritual gatherings of this particular tribe, there was more food than could possibly be consumed at one meal.  I have to say, that was among the best-smelling laboratories I’ve ever been in, and all the rats were quite pleased.


It is for smiles on family faces that we bake.


I will be performing further experiments with that banana bread.


Glenn
Onceuponamac's picture
Onceuponamac

I'm pretty satisfied with these- the lamination worked better than last time I tried - I think I was keeping the dough too cold last time around.


 



 



 



 

ananda's picture
ananda

 


A selection of breads made at home this weekend... 


•1.    BorodinskyDSCF1814


Utilising a scald, as the previous attempt; see here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22439/brief-report-young-baker-competition-and-weekend-bread-baking-home


The sour was built using 2 elaborations, with 18 hour fermentation time in between.   I started with 80g stock and ended up with 1040g of sour.


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour [see above]

 

 

Total Dark Rye Flour

30

360

Total Water

50

600

TOTAL

80

960

 

 

 

2. Scald

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

20

240

Malt Syrup

4.5

54

Black Strap Molasses

6

72

Coriander

1

12

Salt

1

12

Water

35

420

TOTAL

67.5

810

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Rye Sour [from above]

80

960

Scald [from above]

67.5

810

Dark Rye Flour

23.5

282

Strong White Flour

26.5

318

TOTAL

197.5

2370

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% hydration

85

-

 

Method:

  • Build the leaven as above. At the same time as preparing the final elaboration, 18 hours ahead of mixing the final paste, prepare the scald. Dissolve the malt, molasses and salt in the water, and bring to a rolling boil. Stir in the flour and coarsely ground coriander. Cover and leave to cool.
  • Combine scald, sour and both flours to form a paste. Bulk ferment for 1 hour.
  • Prepare a Pullman pan by lining with silicone paper. Scale 2kg of paste into the pan with wet hands, and smooth to shape. Make a "steamed pudding" with the remaining paste.
  • Proof time will be 2 - 3 hours. Bake from cold in an oven with a pan of water, raising the temperature to 160°C. Bake time of 2½ hours.
  • De-pan and cool on wires. Wrap in linen for 24 hours before slicing.DSCF1816DSCF1817DSCF1827DSCF1828

 

 

•2.    Pain au Leaven using both Rye Sour and Wheat Levain<DSCF1803/p>

Refreshment regime for rye sour is as above.   Wheat leaven also 2 elaborations, first of 8 hours, second of 4 hours.   This dough was retarded overnight and baked off the next day.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Total Strong Flour

17.9

150

Total Water

10.65

90

TOTAL

28.55

240

 

 

 

2. Rye Sour

 

 

Total Dark Rye Flour

7.1

60

Total Water

10.65

90

TOTAL

17.75

150

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

28.55

240

Rye Sour [from above]

17.75

150

Strong White Flour

75

630

Salt

1.8

15

Water

46.4

390

TOTAL

169.5

1425

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% hydration

67.7

-

 

Method:

  • Elaborate leavens as above.
  • Combine all the materials to form a dough, and mix until well-developed.
  • Bulk proof for 2 hours, then retard overnight
  • Shape and final proof for 5 hours [ I gave this maximum proof]
  • Bake with steam as 1 large loaf, for 1 hour
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1791DSCF1794DSCF1799 DSCF1801DSCF1806DSCF1811

•3.    Mixed Levains and Shoyu-Roasted Sunflower Seed Boule

Leaven cultures built as detailed above.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Total Flour

36.4

200

Total Water

21.8

120

TOTAL

58.2

320

 

 

 

2. Rye Sour

 

 

Total Dark Rye

8.2

45

Total Water

13.6

75

TOTAL

21.8

120

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

58.2

320

Rye Sour [from above]

21.8

120

Strong White Flour

45.4

250

Dark Rye Flour

10

55

Salt

1.6

9

Sunflower Seeds

16.4

90

Water

32.7

180

TOTAL

186.1 

1024

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

44.6

 

% hydration

68.1

 

 

Method:

  • Build the leavens.
  • Roast the sunflower seeds in shoyu under the grill, turning as necessary.
  • Combine all ingredients except the seeds and mix to form a soft dough. Develop this, then add the seeds and complete with a sequence of 4 "stretch and folds" over a 2 hour bulk proof.
  • Shape and prove in a brotform for 4 hours
  • Bake with steam for 45 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1830DSCF1831

Borodinsky is for the main College Diversity Competition.

Large Boule had to be cut into prematurely, as I needed some lunch and that was the only bread available.

The Sunflower Seed bread is only just out of the oven, but straight to the freezer.   With the shoyu-roasted seeds, rye flour at nearly 20% and an ambitious 44.6% pre-fermented flour, I guess this loaf will pack a full punch in flavour.   Lovely crumb to it, for sure!

All good wishes

Andy

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Charmeli are one of the only glazed taralli in Italy and are an Easter specialty. This taralli however can be found year round. Made with eggs and boiled before baking they are very light.


 


http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2011/03/25/a-frosted-taralli-charmel-are-an-easter-specialty/


 


dmiller3's picture
dmiller3

 


Dear Mr. HMerlitti
| Title: The spreadsheet you are having  problems with


 


 


I am somewhat overweight


My wife is very thin


So we do not begin each day


By baking once again.


 


But 'twon't be long


Before that urge


Springs forth with vigor anew


To measure, mix, knead and do


That magic that only bakers view.


 


So now I have your spreadsheet out


I'll probably spring for a bigger bout


A bigger mess there will be no doubt


And the Ms. might puff and pout


But friends far and wide will shout with joy


Saying "Here comes Dan, the Baker Boy"


 


Thanks for the extra info on the spreadsheet. !!  I think I can handle it fine now,   If not, I'm still here and you' re still there                                      Dmiller3

louie brown's picture
louie brown

My wife returned from Israel with some beautiful zatar. The word describes both an herb as well as an herb blend. She brought both, from a spice dealer in her home town, where her family has been living for about two hundred years. The spice dealer has been there about as long. The blend varies from place to place and typically, people argue over their preferences. Most of the blends have the zatar, thyme, sesame. This one has lemon salt as well. It's just a great herbal condiment.


Zatar calls for flatbread, although it's great on grilled meat, for example, especially chicken, and with Lebanese yoghurt.


So, some pitot, barely visible on the left, and the much more challenging carta di musica, also known as Pane Carasau in Sardinia. In this case, the instructions using volume directions that I located were way off for my conditions, so I mixed it up to approximate a dough in the low to mid 60's hydration. I used a combination of ap and semolina flour and some olive oil. I used a little commercial yeast, although I'm sure this isn't necessary. I hydtated a portion of the flour and water and a little yeast overnight before making up the dough, a sort of biga for flavor, as the dough goes very fast the next day with the commercial yeast.


These are rolled out very thin. An intensive mix helps with dough strength. Once on the stones in the oven, they should puff like pita, but much, much thinner. They are taken out at this point, separated into the two halves, and thrown back on the stones to crisp up and brown.


Fun to make and eat, if a little tricky. 


Haycar's picture
Haycar

If I have a formula for BFT of say 10 minutes what does it mean?


can someone please explain?


Cheers


Hayden

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