The Fresh Loaf

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ananda's picture
ananda

Finally I find time to post.   It's been a busy festive season, with a mamoth baking session on Boxing Day, and a smaller one today.   To the detail, beginning with pre-ferments for the initial large bake.

 

 

RYE SOUR DOUGH

Stock Sour 288g [D. Rye Flour 108; Water 180] Saturday 18:00

1. Rye Sourdough  288

D. Rye Flour           292 [+ 108 = 400 TOTAL]

Water                     220 [+ 180 = 400 TOTAL]

TOTAL                   800 mixed Sunday 10:00

2. Rye Sourdough 800

D. Rye Flour          330 [+ 400 = 730 TOTAL]

Water                    330 [+ 400 = 730 TOTAL]

TOTAL                1460g mixed Sunday 20:00

 

“SCALD”, or “ZAVARKHA”

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

300

Red Malted Barley Powder

100

Boiling Water

700

TOTAL

1100

 

PÂTE FERMENTÉE

Wholemeal Bread Flour  500

Salt                                   10

Butter                               10

Fresh Yeast                     10

Water                             340

TOTAL                           870g

mixed Sunday 19:00, fermented 1 hour, then retarded overnight

 

WHEAT LEVAIN

1.Stock Levain  216 [Bread Flour 135; Water 81] Saturday 18:00

Bread Flour      300 [+ 135 = 435 TOTAL]

Water               180 [+  81 = 261 TOTAL]

TOTAL             696 mixed Sunday 10:00

2.Levain           696

Bread Flour     600 [+ 435 = 1035 TOTAL]

Water              360 [+ 261 =  621 TOTAL]

TOTAL          1656 mixed Sunday 14:00

 

FLAX SEED SOAKER

Flax Seed Blond     200

Cold Water             600

TOTAL                   800 mixed Sunday 10:00

 

“POOLISH”

Bread Flour    840g

Fresh Yeast   003g

Water             840g

TOTAL         1683g [use 561g for Croissant Dough and 1122g for Bloomers]

mix Sunday 20:00

 

BIGA

Bread Flour    400  

Water             240

Fresh Yeast   002

TOTAL           642g mixed Sunday 19:30

The first six of these were all made on Monday 26th December using a combination of both wood-fired brick oven and electric oven to complete the baking.   A Christmas Marathon, totalling 25 loaves, plus a range of laminated pastries!   Sorry, there are no photographs from this bake; I was just too busy trying to cope with the hectic schedule preparing for family visiting etc.

1.    Sourdough Seed Bread with Wheat Levain, Wholemeal Flour, Roasted Seeds and a Cold Flax Seed Soaker

For the levain build and cold soaker, see above.

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

1000

Water

15

600

TOTAL

40

1600

 

 

 

1b. Cold Soaker

 

 

Flax Seed Blond

5

200

Water

15

600

TOTAL

20

800

 

 

 

1c. Roasted Seeds

 

 

Pumpkin Seeds

5

200

Sunflower Seeds

5

200

Pumpkin, Sunflower, Hemp, Flax, Sesame

1.5

60

Japanese Organic Tamari Soy Sauce

To Taste

 

TOTAL

11.5

460

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

40

1600

Cold Soaker [from 1b]

20

800

Roasted Seeds [from 1c]

11.5

460

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

35

1400

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

40

1600

Salt

1.8

72

Water

48

1920

TOTAL

196.3

7852

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

78

68.67flour+seeds

% wholegrain flour

40

-

% of seeds on flour

16.5

-

FACTOR

40

-

 

 

Method:

  • Build the levain as above, and prepare the cold soaker.
  • Roast the Seeds under the grill with tamari to taste; turn as needed.   Cool.
  • Prepare an autolyse with both flours plus water for the final dough.   Leave 1 hour to stand.
  • Add the salt, leaven and soaker and mix on first speed for 5 minutes, scraping down as needed, and adjusting the hydration if necessary.   Mix for 3 minutes on second speed, then scrape down and check development.   Add the roasted seeds and mix on first speed until cleared.
  • Retard the dough overnight.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour to return the dough to 26°C.
  • Scale and divide.   Mould each dough piece round, and rest whilst preparing bannetons.   I made 9 various sized boules from this dough.
  • Re-mould, then prove upside down in bannetons for 3 hours
  • Turn each loaf onto a peel, score the top, then set to bake in the wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 2.    100% Wholemeal Panned Breads made with Pâte Fermentée

For the Pâte Fermentée schedule, see above

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Pâte Fermentée

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

25

500

Salt

0.5

10

Butter

0.5

10

Fresh Yeast

0.5

10

Water

17

340

TOTAL

43.5

870

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Pâte Fermentée [from 1]

43.5

870

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

75

1500

Salt

1.3

26

Butter

1.3

26

Fresh Yeast

2

40

Water

55

1100

TOTAL

178.1

3562

 

 

 

% overall pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

72

-

% wholegrain flour

100

-

FACTOR

20

-

Method:

  • As described above, for the Pâte Fermentée, combine all the ingredients in a mixer, and mix on first speed for 5 minutes, scraping down as needed.   Mix a further 2 – 4 minutes on second speed.   Bulk ferment for 2 hours, then retard overnight.
  • To mix the final dough, firstly autolyse flour and water for 1 hour.   Then add the Pâte Fermentée and the other ingredients and mix for 2 minutes on first speed.   Scrape down and mix for 7 minutes on second speed.   DDT 28°C
  • Bulk ferment 40 – 50 minutes at 28°C
  • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest covered for 10 - 15 minutes and prepare bread pans.   Shape dough pieces and place into pans.   I made 3 different-sized panned loaves, plus 1 bloomer.
  • Final proof 2 hours at 28°C.
  • Bake in the wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

3.    Bloomers made with a “Poolish” and Rye Sourdough

For the schedules for both the “Poolish” and the Rye Sourdough, see above.

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

5

100

Water

5

100

TOTAL

10

200

 

 

 

1b. “Poolish”

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

28

560

Water

28

560

Fresh Yeast

0.1

2

TOTAL

56.1

1122

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

10

200

“Poolish” [from 1b]

56.1

1122

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

67

1340

Salt

1.8

36

Fresh Yeast

2.5

50

Water

30

600

TOTAL

167.4

3348

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

33

-

% overall hydration

63

-

% wholegrain flour

5

-

FACTOR

20

-

 

Method:

  • Build levain and “poolish” as above.
  • Combine both pre-ferments with all the other ingredients for the final dough in a mixer.   Mix with the hook attachment on first speed for 3 minutes, scraping down as needed and making any necessary adjustment to hydration.   Mix a further 4 – 5 minutes on second speed to develop.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk proof 50 minutes @ 26°C.
  • Scale and divide and mould round.   Rest covered and prepare baking sheets.   Shape for bloomers and tray up.   I made 3 large bloomers.
  • Final proof @ 28°C for 2 hours.
  • Cut the tops of the loaves with 3 diagonal slashes, spray with water, and bake on the sole of the wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 4.    Ciabatta with a “Biga”

For the “Biga”, see schedule above

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. “Biga”

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

40

400

Fresh Yeast

0.2

2

Water

24

240

TOTAL

64.2

642

 

 

 

2a. Final Dough – “Bassinage”

 

 

“Biga” [from 1]

64.2

642

Gilchesters’ Organic Ciabatta/Pizza Flour

60

600

Salt

1.8

18

Fresh Yeast

2

20

Water

44

440

TOTAL

172

1720

 

 

 

2b. Final Dough – Wet Stage

 

 

Final Dough – “Bassinage”

172

1720

Water

12 – 17

120 – 170

TOTAL

184 - 189

1840 - 1890

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

40

-

% overall hydration

80 – 85

-

FACTOR

10

-

 

 

Method:

  • Prepare the biga as above.
  • For the bassinage, add all ingredients to the mixer, attach a dough hook and mix on first speed for 3 minutes, scraping down as needed.   Mix a further 3 minutes on second speed.   For the final stage, change to a paddle beater and let the down down to required wet consistency on first and second speeds.   Scrape down as needed.   Final DDT 26°C
  • Line a container with some olive oil, and pour the wet dough into the container.   Cover and hold at 26°C for 2 hours, using stretch and fold after a ½, 1 and 1½ hours.
  • Move to the “dry” stage and scale and divide dough pieces using a combination of Gilchesters’ flour and Coarse Semolina.   I made 6 ciabatta breads.
  • Final proof for up to 1 hour.
  • Bake on the sole of a hot wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 5.    “Rossisky” using the Auerman Method

See above for Rye Sourdough Build

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

600

Water

30

600

TOTAL

60

1200

 

 

 

1b. “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

300

Red Malted Barley Powder

5

100

Boiling Water

35

700

TOTAL

55

1100

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a.]

60

1200

“Scald” [from 1b.]

55

1100

TOTAL

115

2300

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

115

2300

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye –finely sifted

30

600

Gilchesters’ Organic Pizza/Ciabatta Flour

20

400

Water

20

400

Salt

1.5

30

TOTAL

186.5

3730

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

FACTOR

20

-

 

Method:

  • Build the sour as described, make the Scald, then combine the 2 to make the Sponge.   Ferment this for 4 hours.
  • I sifted through the Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye flour, reserving the fine flour to use here   Add the Gilchesters’ Pizza flour to this, plus the water and autolyse for 1 hour.   Add the salt and the sponge to the autolyse in a mixer, and combine with the paddle beater to form a paste.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour.
  • Line a Pullman Pan and other bread pans neatly with silicone paper and scale the paste into the pans, neatening off carefully.   Attach lids.
  • Final Proof 3 hours.   Bake overnight in the “dead” wood-fired oven.   Sadly, these did not work, as the oven was just too dead, so the loaves did not bake out.   I made a half batch again today and scaled the whole mixture into one large Pullman Pan.

 

 6.Croissant Dough with a “Poolish”   [See the “Poolish” schedule above]

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. “Poolish”

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

28

280

Fresh Yeast

0.1

1

Water

28

280

TOTAL

56.1

561

 

 

 

2. “Détrempe”

 

 

“Poolish” [from 1]

56.1

561

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

72

720

Chilled Water

32

320

Salt

1.2

12

Milk Powder

5

50

Fresh Yeast

5

50

Caster Sugar

8

80

TOTAL

179.3

1793

 

 

 

3. Lamination

 

 

Détrempe [from 2]

179.3

1793

Organic Slightly Salted Butter

41.6

416

TOTAL

220.9

2209

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

28

-

% hydration

60

-

% fat on flour

41.6

-

FACTOR

10

-

Method:

  • Mix the “poolish” as above, and leave to ferment overnight.   Chill both the flour and water for the final dough in the fridge overnight.
  • Combine all the ingredients for the final dough in the mixer.   Attach a dough hook and mix on first speed for 4 minutes, scraping down and adjusting the hydration as necessary.   Develop the dough on second speed for 3 minutes.
  • Retard the dough for 1 hour.
  • Incorporate the laminating fat using the English method.   Retard 1 hour.
  • Give 4 half turns to the dough with 1 hour rest between each turn, in the chiller.
  • Process as required.   I used the pastry dough to make a Chestnut loaf for Christmas Dinner with my family, plus a selection of croissants, pains au chocolat.   I made “Palmiers” with the scrap dough.
  • Prove finished pieces for 45 minutes and bake in the electric oven using a convection setting at 210°C.
  • Cool on wires.

 7.    Bloomers made with a “Poolish” and Rye Sourdough and Wholemeal

For the schedules for both the “Poolish” and the Rye Sourdough, see above.

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

5

130

Water

5

130

TOTAL

10

260

 

 

 

1b. “Poolish”

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

28

728

Water

28

728

Fresh Yeast

0.1

2.6

TOTAL

56.1

1458.6

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

10

260

“Poolish” [from 1b]

56.1

1458.6

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

22

572

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

45

1170

Salt

1.8

46.8

Fresh Yeast

2.55

65

Water

34.05

885.3

TOTAL

167.4

4457.7

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

33

-

% overall hydration

67.05

-

% wholegrain flour

50

-

FACTOR

26

-

 

Method:

  • Build levain and “poolish” as above.
  • Combine both pre-ferments with all the other ingredients for the final dough in a mixer.   Mix with the hook attachment on first speed for 3 minutes, scraping down as needed and making any necessary adjustment to hydration.   Mix a further 4 – 5 minutes on second speed to develop.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk proof 50 minutes @ 26°C.
  • Scale and divide and mould round.   Rest covered and prepare baking sheets.   Shape for bloomers and tray up.
  • Final proof @ 28°C for 2 hours.
  • Cut the tops of the loaves with 3 diagonal slashes, spray with water, and bake on the sole of the wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

Photos from today’s baking shown below:

 

A Very Happy New Year to you all!

Andy

Szanter5339's picture
Szanter5339

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

Reflection is a bitter sweet thing.

Why do we have dessert at the end of a meal? Dessert gives us a feeling of happiness. Why do we love coffee? For me, to counter the sweetness that has accumulated in my palate.

On this last day of the year I reflect:  Bitterness gives meaning to sweetness.

 

                                         

 

My husband replaced our refrigerator while I was away. The old fridge had refused to give up the ghost and was still going. I do not know what prompted him to replace it. Early spring cleaning?!

My girlfriend came by to have coffee and a piece of chocolate panforte. I was looking through the junk in our new fridge that my husband has kept for me from the old fridge. I saw a jar of green tea powder and asked my girlfriend to have a look. She said, with a roaring laughter, “It expired in 2008!” Notwithstanding, I had a taste and it was very bitter. Then, I found a gift packet from Three Sisters’ Inn in Kyoto, Japan, where I had stayed numerous times. It contains sachets of green tea soup – savory with a hint of sourness.

In the back of the new fridge, I found more macha green tea powder. Can I build this into a sourdough with, say, chocolate – sweet and bitterness? Here it is, but don’t do what I do. It is a bit wacky for a sourdough.

 

                               

 

I also built in orange preserves to give it contrast and colour.

 

                                     

 

Green Tea, Chocolate and Orange Sourdough

 

  • 230 g liquid starter (fed 90% plain flour and 10% rye flour)
  • 575 g flour (90% plain flour and 10% rye flour)
  • 4 g macha green tea powder (mixed into the flour)
  • 150 g chocolate chips (Don’t use expensive ones; cheap ones keep their shape better in baking)
  • 260 g orange preserves with its syrup (stew slices of oranges in sugar, cloves, and some lemon juice depending on how sweet your oranges are)
  • 300 g water (Here is the tricky part. I started with about 250 g water. I wanted a medium soft dough consistency, about 72% overall hydration. It depends on how much syrup in your orange preserves. I ended up using more water, maybe 50 g or so.)
  • 14 g sea salt

 

                                     

                                         

                                         

 

I forgot there was much sugar in the dough and  had baked it in too high a temperature, around 230 C.  Lower temperature would have been better to allow a longer bake for crispier crust.

With so many ingredients and flavours in the dough, David’s 21-hour retarding won’t be necessary. Lean dough benefits from a long period of retarding, but it will be an overkill for the kind of dough I have here.

 

                                    

                                         

                                               

 

The dominant flavour in this bread is chocolate, and therefore it is sweet. The orange gives it an added dimension. You hardly smell or taste the macha green tea and it is a shame.

I believe there will continue to be efforts in building in more bitterness in our baking and our cuisine in general. Bitterness adds depth in flavour, and more fullness in taste. I believe we are ready for more complexity.

I have always had a sweet tooth. I have just had too much sweetness in my life…

 

                                                 

                                      

 

Have a wonderful 2012!

 

Shiao-Ping

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

I got a call that there's a discount on one kitchen item that I've been eyeing for like 3 years.  After lunch, I quickly hop over to the store,  the buy is not only a discount but also a free meat grinder,  well,  I wanted the pasta maker.  The sales girl promised that there will be a free surprise gadget in the pack,  and ok,  fine, we decided to buy it.  Well,  the surprise was not there and the sales girl decided to give us a the pasta maker for free!,  I was exhilarated.  


Lugging the big item back home, my son had to help me carry it home.   I couldn't wait to try.  But it was already evening,  too late for a quick bake.  I decided to work Daniel Leader's Local Breads,  usually turns out really really well.  And,  my son requested for Rosemary Bread.  Leader's Local Breads contains a lot of recipes that uses herbs,  simply love it,  and uses biga that somehow,  makes it easy for the bread to work with and it usually turns out excellent.Rosemary Filone (Daniel Leader's Local Breads)1.  Took the biga out from the fridge, put into the mixer bowl.  add in water,  and used the stirrer to cut up in chunks.2.  Add in all Ingredients, all dry first then, followed by wet.3.  Mix for 10 mins using no. 3 ( I initially used 4 and the whole machine was jumping like crazy, I was afraid that it'll jump off the counter.)  In the meantime,  I was able to do some cleaning up.4.  After 10 mins, the gluten was developed very well,  I was able to get my window pane dough.  And the dough was warm from the mixing.  Remove from the bowl.5.  Round the dough and leave in the container for 1st proof.6.  1 hour 15 mins.  the dough doubled.   7.  Split dough by half,  fold and leave for 15 mins.8.  Shape into loaf and leave in basket to proof for another 1 hour.9.  Meanwhile,  heat oven at 210 degree celsius.10. Score dough, bake for 40 minutes with steam.  (this bread is stated as no steam required, but I prefer the crust to be crispy and light)Rosemary Filone:  The dough doubled in the oven,  and the rosemary smell wafted through the oven as it was baking. This bread is so soft and the crumbs were so well stretched. Ricotta Bread - Pane Alla Ricotta(Daniel Leader's Local Breads)Since I had my machine and flour all out,  I decided to make another bread at the same time. I had a box of Ricotta that I bought,  but not sure how to use it other and there in front of me, just a few pages down,  Ricotta Bread.  I just have to try it.1.  Same method,  dry ingredients first then followed by cheese and butter, then water and milk.2.  Mix for 10 mins at No. 3.3.  Dough was mixed well. Window Pane achieved again.4.  Let proof for 1 hour 30 mins.5.  Cut 2/3 and 1/3.  Fold and leave for 15 mins.6.  Round the 2/3 dough and 1/3 into loaf.  Leave to proof for 1 hour 30 mins.7.  Score dough,  bake bread for 30 mins, with steam.  This time,  the loaves tripled.  The milk and ricotta seems to make the dough much lighter than other breads,  and with the steam,  the bread just bloomed.  This is the first bread that I see spread, bloomed,  just indescribable.I am totally happy with this new machine that I bought.  Totally satisfied,  as I usually don't get consistent mix.  And now,  with only 10 mins,  and the dough is so well mixed,  gluten fully developed. https://sites.google.com/a/jlohcook.com/jennycook/latest-postings/rosemaryfiloneandricottabreadwithmybrandnewkenwood
Mebake's picture
Mebake

Having lusted over High percentage, multistage Rye breads for some time now, and being inspired by recent posts such as Phil’s and Cordruta’s, I finally took the plunge.

This is one time consuming, precariously scheduled recipe, that leaves you wondering at the end, whether or not crafting this bread is worth it.

Medium Rye is not available where I live, and so I improvised by sifting whole grain rye flour. The resultant flour consistency is close to a medium rye (I think).

I followed Hamelman’s instructions, including 1 tsp of yeast at the end. As usual, this is a paste rather than a dough, and therefore to boost the 20% bread flour strength , I added 1 Tbl Vital wheat gluten to the final mixture.

The Paste, rounded by wet hands. Bowl oiled slightly with water.

 The paste, divided and rounded by wet hands.

Smooth top Heavily Dusted with whole Rye flour.

Inverted into a 50% bread flour, 50% rice flour dusted kitchen towel.

 After 50 minutes of proofing.

Inverted on to parchment, with corn meal at the bottom.

32 hours later.

Lovely slightly moist crumb, and chewy rye-infused flavored crust. Very typical of German Rye.

The verdict: worth it, only if i could afford a whole day at home.

What spreads would best complement this bread? anyone?

This was my last bread of 2011, happy New year everyone!

 

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Back in May, 2010, bnom posted a reminiscence of the San Francisco Sourdough bread baked by Larraburu Brothers Bakery, which went out of business about 30 years ago after a fire in their plant. (See Divine inspiration--for me it way Larraburu Brother's SF SD. What was it for you?) For many who grew up eating it, the Larraburu bread was the quintessential San Francisco Sourdough. Although the bakery is long-gone (and much lamented), Doc.Dough found a journal article from 1978 describing their formula and process, so we might attempt to reproduce this famous bread.

Doc.Dough's citation is quoted below, as follows:

Title: Lactic and volatile (C2-C5) organic acids of San Francisco sourdough French bread

Cereal Chemistry 55(4): 461-468; Copyright 1978 The American Association of Cereal Chemists

Authors: A. M. Galal, J. A. Johnson, and E. Varriano-Marston

The Larraburu Company produces San Francisco sourdough French bread by the sponge and dough process.  Each day a piece of straight dough or starter sponge known as the "Mother" is saved and refrigerated to be used as a starter sponge the following day.  This starter sponge is used to make more starter sponge as well as sponges for bread production.  The starter sponge consists of 100 parts of clear flour (14% protein), approximately 50 parts of water, and 50 parts of the starter sponge.  The ingredients are mixed and fermented for 9-10 hr at 80°F.  The bread dough is made by mixing 100 parts flour 12% protein, 60 parts of water, 15 parts of sponge, and 1.5-2% salt.  The dough rests 1 hr and then is divided, molded, and deposited on canvas dusted with corn meal or rice flour.  The dough is proofed for 4 hr at 105°F (41°C) and 96% relative humidity and baked at 420°F (216°C) for 40-50 min in a Perkins oven with direct injection of low pressure steam (5 psi).  Oven shelves were covered with Carborundum.

Specific instructions for mixing are not provided, but I would surmise that, because of the very short bulk fermentation and long proofing times, Larraburu Brothers used an intensive mix. This would result in a bread with high volume but a relatively dense, even crumb. I altered the procedure to use an autolyse, a less intensive mix, a longer bulk fermentation with a stretch and fold and a shorter proof. My intention was to bake a bread with a more open crumb structure and better flavor.

The autolyse allows the flour to absorb the water and for gluten to start developing. This head start on gluten development allows for a shorter mixing time to get to the desired stage of gluten development. Less mixing has two principal effects: 1) The gluten strands are less organized, resulting in a more open crumb with a random distribution of holes of varying size. 2) Less oxidation of the carotenoid pigments in the flour, resulting in a more yellow crumb color and better bread flavor.

Note that the fermentation and proofing temperature control was made possible by using a Brod & Taylor Proofing Box.

To make one 1 kg loaf:

Sponge (Stiff Levain)

Baker's %

Wt (g)

High-gluten flour

100

45

Water

50

22

Stiff starter

50

22

Total

200

89

Mix thoroughly and ferment for 9-10 hours at 80º F in a lightly oiled bowl, covered tightly.

Final dough

Baker's %

Wt (g)

AP flour

100

565

Water

60

339

Salt

2

11

Sponge (stiff levain)

15

85

Total

177

1000

 

Procedure

  1. Mix the flour and water in a stand mixer with the paddle for 1-2 minutes at Speed 1.

  2. Cover the mixer bowl tightly and autolyse for 20-60 minutes. (I autolysed for 60 minutes.)

  3. Sprinkle the salt on the dough and add the sponge in chunks.

  4. Mix for 1-2 minutes with the paddle at Speed 1, then switch to the dough hook and mix for 5 minutes at Speed 2. Adjust the dough consistency by adding small amounts of water or flour, if needed. (I did not add either.) The dough should be tacky but not sticky. It should clean both the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.

  5. Transfer the dough to a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Cover tightly.

  6. Ferment at 105º F for 2 1/2 to 3 hours in a humid environment. Stretch and fold once at 1 1/4 hours.

  7. Pre-shape the dough round and cover with a towel or plasti-crap.

  8. Let the dough relax for 15-20 minutes.

  9. Shape as a boule or bâtard.

  10. Proof at 105º F in a floured banneton or en couche, covered, until the dough slowly fills a hole poked in it with a finger. (This was in 30 minutes, for me!)

  11. About 45 minutes before baking, pre-heat the oven to 480º F with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

  12. Transfer the loaf to a peel and score it as desired.

  13. Transfer the loaf to the baking stone. Turn down the oven to 450º F.

  14. Bake with steam for 15 minutes. Remove your steaming apparatus, and bake for another 25 to 35 minutes until the crust is nicely colored and the internal temperature is at least 205º F.

  15. Turn off the oven, but leave the loaf on the baking stone with the oven door ajar for another 10-15 minutes.

  16. Transfer the loaf to a cooling rack, and cool completely (at least 2 hours) before slicing. 

Proofed, slashed and ready to bake

The bread had exuberant oven spring and bloom. In hindsight, it could have proofed for another 15 minutes or so without harm. I baked it for a total of 40 minutes. The crust was very firm, and the loaf sang nicely while cooling. The aroma was that of fresh-baked bread without any yeasty overtones. 

Crackley Crust

Classic SF SD crumb

I sliced and tasted the bread about 3 hours after it came out of the oven. The aroma of the bread was sweet and wheaty. The crust was very crunchy with a wonderful flavor I have had from the crusts of excellent bakery loaves but not before from my oven. The crumb was quite tender and cool-feeling. The flavor was sweet with only a hint of lactic acid, creamy-type sourness. I could discern no acetic acid presence at all, much to my surprise.

Now, that's not "bad!" I'd say this may be the best flavored French-style pain au levain I've ever made. But it does certainly not have the assertive, vinegary tang usually associated with San Francisco Sourdough. In fact, my wife, who is not at all fond of super-sour sourdoughs, said, "This is better than San Francisco Sourdough!" I try not to argue with her, but it's clearly a matter of taste. 

I'm going to give this recipe some thought and may tweak it to get more sourness, but, you know, I may make it just like this again too. It's really outstanding!

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

During the holidays, and for the first time, we baked 1-lb. loaves, one-third smaller than our usual 1.5-lb loaves. We did this because we gifted a number of family and friends that live alone, reasoning that a larger loaf would likely stale before it was consumed. Furthermore, I can bake three 1-lb per load in my household oven, but only two 1.5-lb loaves otherwise. We  baked more than was needed, so we've been consuming the leftovers. We've realized the smaller loaves serve our needs--there is only two of us--as well, or possibly better than the larger loaves. I'll continue to make larger loaves to share at our frequent community pot-luck dinners, or when we entertain.

I also like simply hand-shaping batards, and proofing the loaves on a couche vis-a-vis bannetons.

This formula is 10/45/45: Whole Rye Flour/KA Bread Flour/KA AP Flour, with  14% of the flour (all Bread Flour) prefermented in the levain build. Hydration is 68%. I retard the dough for 15 hours at 54°F.

David G

David G

varda's picture
varda

The many nice bagel posts lately have spurred me on toward bagel making.    I was excited to see that In The Jewish Bakery has a recipe for Montreal bagels.   I grew up on New York Bagels which had made their way to St. Louis by the 1960s.    It was a revelation when I stopped for a snack in the Ottawa Airport one day to find a bagel that was completely different but quite delicious.   That was almost 20 years ago, and since I stopped working in Canada,  Montreal bagels have been few and far between.   That is set to change.

Ok.   My shaping needs work, but that doesn't interfere with breakfast for lunch. 

These are quick bagels - from mix to plate in around 2 hours, and so not as much flavor as their overnight retarded New York cousins.   But delicious all the same, a tasty treat. 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

You could call it "FICTION." (Fraternal Inspiration to Cook The Identical Offerings Nightly) But it's true. Brother Glenn and I end up baking the same breads or cooking the same dishes more often than one would expect by chance alone. 

My barbecued beef sandwiches are, strictly speaking, not identical to Glenn's. He used leftover rib roast. I used braised brisket. He made hoagie-type rolls from the Vienna Bread dough in BBA. I made double knotted rolls from the Medium Vienna Dough in Inside the Jewish Bakery. I served mine with baked yams and Curtido, a South American version of cole slaw.

The ITJB Medium Vienna dough was bulk fermented to triple (2 hours at 78 degrees F).

Yup. That's tripled.

Even though this is a rather low-hydration, stiff dough, full fermentation yields a roll that is light, airy and tender with delicious flavor, yet firm enough to not get soggy and fall apart when used to make a saucy sandwich. I scaled the rolls to 4 oz, 3/4 proofed them, egg washed twice, sprinkled with sesame seeds and baked them at 350 degrees for 17 minutes.

The brisket was prepared as follows:

2 lbs lean brisket, well-trimmed of fat.

3 cups sliced onions

4 cloves of garlic, crushed

2 medium carrots cut in 2 inch pieces

1 bay leaf

1/2 cup of dry wine (red, white or a mixture)

Water to just cover the other ingredients.

Note: No salt. The sauce provides plenty of salt and spice.

Place all the ingredients except the water in a heavy dutch oven with the brisket fat-side up. (I used a Le Creuset oval enameled cast iron oven.) Pour in enough water to barely cover the meat. Cover tightly. Bring to a boil on top of the stove then place in a pre-heated 350 degree F oven and bake until the meat is fork-tender (about 3 hours). Bake uncovered for the last 30 minutes or so to brown the meat and reduce the gravy somewhat.

Transfer the contents to another container to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, skim off any visible fat. Slice the brisket thinly, across the grain of the meat. Mix about a cup of barbecue sauce (I like "San Francisco's Original Firehouse No. 2 Bar-B-Que Sauce.") with a few tablespoons of gravy (without the veggies) to thin it in a cookpot large enough to hold the sauce and sliced brisket. Simmer partly covered on top of the stove to thoroughly heat the meat.

Heap meat and some sauce on rolls and serve immediately with side dishes of your choice.

Enjoy!

This week, I also made Hamelman's "Sourdough Seed Bread." I hadn't made this one in quite a while. It was even better than I remembered. Highly recommended!

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting

 

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

A couple of years ago I bought  Bosch Universal mixer because I was thinking of making large batches of whole wheat bread for my son's family. Well, the grandgirls make their own lunches and prefer sliced bread, so my mixer has been sitting taking up counter space and at most has been used 12 times. So I want to do what I should have done in the first place which is to buy the Bosch Compact, much more sensible for a little old lady living alone.  I hope to sell the big mixer which is in excellent condition, and who better to offer it to than a fellow TFL member? Sorry, Floyd, not sure of the proper place for selling things, A.

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