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Juergen Krauss

/* UPDATE: Der deutsche Text ist am Ende dieses Beitrags */

Karin (Hanseata) pointed us to a blog event that is currently on, closing on April 17:

 

1. Plötziade

 

The challenge is an interesting one.

My idea for a bread with the prescribed ingredients of this challenge
(450g bread flour, 50g wholemeal rye flour, 10g salt, any amount of water, any leavening agent, any process)was inspired by Hamelman's Vermont Sourdough and Carol Field's Pane Nero di Bolzano - a rather unlikely match.

The bread looks like your typical German "Weizen-Mischbrot", but it has deeper flavour notes ranging from a pronounced tang to the unique sweetness of a yeast-rye-poolish. And the mouthfeel is quite smooth.

Here the formula (the preferments have 10% added to account for loss):

IngredientPercentWeight
Straight Formula  
Wheat Flour90450
WG Rye1050
Salt210
Yeast (Instant)0.060.3
Water68340
Yield170.06850.3
   
Rye Poolish  
WG Rye1055
Yeast0.060.3
Water20110
   
Wheat Sour  
Wheat Flour20110
Water25138
Mature Sour211
   
Final Dough  
Wheat Flour70350
WG Rye00
Salt210
Yeast (Instant)00
Water23115
Rye Poolish30.06150
Wheat Sour45225
Yield170.06850.3

Process:

Mix the preferments and let stand for about 12 hours at 23C

Mix the preferments with the remaining ingredients to some degree of gluten development - the dough is notably slack due to the high enzyme activity from the rye poolish. Remember, there are no acids to slow down the enzymes.

Bulk proof ca. 2 hours folding once after 1 hour, shape, final proof c. 1hour.

Bake in falling oven with steam (230C down to 200C) for 30 minutes (500g loaves)

Here some crumb pictures:

The fresh crumb (yes, I am impatient)

and the crumb after two days (and in different light):

I sold this bread at the pop-up market at my boy's school (the ones behind the flowers with the cross slash)
The kids loved it (I provided tasters of all products), and I think it's a very good carrier for all sorts of sweet and savoury goodies, and quite nice just with butter.

 Happy Baking,

Juergen

 ======================================================

Jürgens Brighton Sauerteig

 

Die inspiration zu dieser Formel lieferten zwei Rezepte

  1. Vermont Sourdough von Hamelman’s Bread
  2. Pane Nero di Bolzano von Carol Field’s Italian Baker

 

Als Triebmittel werden ein flüssiger Weizen-Sauerteig und ein Roggen-Poolish verwendet.

 

Der Weizen-Sauerteig gibt dem Brot eine saure Note, waehrend der Roggen-Poolish eher etwas susses beitraegt. Der Poolish last auch die Roggen-Enzyme frei walten, wodurch der Teig eher weich wird,  die Krume fühlt sich “glatter” an als bei vergleichbaren Broten mit Hefe oder Roggen-Sauerteig.

 

Ich habe dieses Brot auf einem Schul-Markt verkauft, zusammen mit Hotcrossbuns, Challah, Vollkornbrot (Hamelman) und meinem Reis-Sauerteig Brot, und es kam bei den Kids am besten an!

 

Jetzt zur Formel:

 

Zutat

Prozent

Gewicht(g)

 

Gesamt-Formel

 

 

 

WM

90

450

 

RM

10

50

 

Salz

2

10

 

Hefe (Instant)

0.06

0.3

 

Wasser

68

340

 

TA

170.06

850

 

 

 

 

 

Roggen Poolish

 

Enthaelt 10% überschuss 

 

RM

10

55

 

Hefe (Instant)

0.06

0.3

 

Wasser

20

110

 

 

 

 

 

Weizen-Sauer

 

Enthaelt 10% überschuss

 

 

WM

20

110

 

Wasser

25

138

 

Anstellgut

2

11

 

 

 

 

 

Teig

 

 

 

WM

70

350

 

RM

0

0

 

Salz

2

10

 

Hefe (Instant)

0

0

 

Wasser

23

115

 

Roggen Poolish

30.06

150

 

Weizen-Sauer

45

225

 

TA

170.06

850

 

 

 

 

 

Prozess:

  1. Bereite den Poolish und Weizen-Sauer zu und lasse sie bei ca. 23C für 12 Stunden stehen.
  2. Verknete die Vorteige und die anderen Zutaten bis sich eine maessige Gluten-Struktur zeigt.
  3. Standzeit für den Teig ca. 2 Stunden, mit einer Faltung nach einer Stunde
  4. Abwiegen und formen
  5. Stückgare etwa 1 Stunde
  6. Backen im Fallenden Ofen mit Dampf, 230C -> 200C für 30 minuten (500g Brote)

 

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Juergen Krauss

Years ago I came across these buns when I went to Basel a lot.

They are sold only during lent, and only in Basel area.

The taste and texture were very memorable - unlike anything I had tasted before.
Next Saturday I will participate in a pop-up market and thought these Faschtewaije might be an interesting candidate.

I found a few recipes and saw what made them special. Lard.

I wouldn't be able to sell a lot of goods containing lard on this occasion (I am going with Hot-Cross Buns)
But my fingers itched and I tried out the recipe.

They came out very nicely, a bit denser than what I remember, but nevertheless a great taste and texture.
I am very happy with this first try.

The recipe is from
http://www.baselinsider.ch/enzyklopaedie/basler-rezepte/basler-rezepte/faschtewaije-fastenwaehe.html

Some more background info is here:

http://www.foodnews.ch/x-plainmefood/30_produkte/Fastenwaehe.html


Here it is in Bakers % and with English ingredient names:

Flour (AP / strong white) 100% (200g)

Salt 1.5%% (3g)

Malt Extract 1% (2g)

Instant Dry Yeast 2% (4g)

Milk  (lukewarm) 62.5% (125g)

Lard (or Butter) 37.5% (75g)

Yield 204.5% (409g)

This amount makes 4 buns 

I used lard - I think that butter turns it into something closer to Brioche.

With lard this tasted just as I remember.

Mix the dry ingredients and milk, and work to develop some gluten.
Add the melted fat and work until you have a very smooth, supple dough. This is the more challenging step.

Proof for about 1 hour at 23C
Divide into 50g - pieces. Preshape and roll them out (with a rolling pin) into oblong pieces.
(This is the step I yet need to figure out - the pieces should have pronounced tips so that the finished bun has roughly a circular shape with two knobbly bits, not unlike the shadow of a lemon.)

Let rise for another hour (while the oven preheats to 190C), cut them in this specific pattern, like -=- (have a look at the pictures of the cutting tool in the links), glaze,sprinkle with caraway seeds, and bake for about 25 minutes,until golden brown. Don't let them go too dark.
The recipe uses an egg yolk and water mix for the glaze, I used plain water.

Happy Baking,
Juergen

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Juergen Krauss

A distant relative asked me if I would provide the Challah for the blessing at her Son's wedding.
I would have complete freedom of choice for all the parameters, e.g. amount, shape, formula.
The 200 guests were to be seated at 18 tables.

After some deliberation I decided to bake 1 Challah for each table, and a special one for the head table.
I thought I'd get 4 X 500g into the oven, which would require 5 batches.

Then ...
I flicked through Hamelman's "Bread" while my dearest wife was watching. She spotted the Hungarian Wedding Braid. That was it! Had to do it now.

The recipe is calculated for a bread diameter of 40cm, too big for my domestic oven. I can accommodate just above 30 cm.
So I did some experiments with the Eggless Water Challah dough from "Inside The Jewish Bakery (ITJB)", an excellent dough to shape and very tasty, too.

I decided that for a 30cm Wedding Bread the best weight for a short strand was 50g, and the long strand would be 250g.

My oven can accommodate 2 of these: now I was looking at producing 9 batches for the Hungarian Breads, plus one for the top-table challah.

On Friday evening I scaled all ingredients for the 12 Kg of ITJB Bakery Challah - flour, water, salt, yeast, sugar, oil and packed them for each batch individually - with exception of the 70 egg yolks...

The next step was creating a spreadsheet that told me what I had to do in 10-minute increments.

For a considerable amount of time I would have 5 batches going simultaneously.

It turned out that the first top-table challah (12 strand double decker) didn't rise well (handling, I suppose), so I had to add another batch.

I started at 5am on Saturday, at my home in Brighton, and was ready to deliver in London by 6.30pm. Phew.

Now some pictures:

Shaping started with scaling the dough and shaping the strands: 7 for each bread, 2 breads in each batch:

To get the star-in wheel shape I had made a template, 30cm in diameter:

The first crossover

The second crossover -the star shape becomes apparent:

And the ring to complete the bread:

Proofing several batches at different stages:

Glazing with egg - I used 4 eggs for the glaze alone

Luckily I had Spock and Kirk with me ...

The pile of finished breads is growing

And boxed, ready for shipping

Not all breads fitted in this giant box ...

Then off to London with public transport

I have no pictures from the wedding (on Sunday) - but there was not much time to take pictures, the challahs were very well received.

Happy Baking,

Juergen 

 

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Juergen Krauss

... lots of things.

First of all, 

Happy Chanukkah, Happy Thanksgiving!

Now about my baking - I didn't have so much time for blogging recently, but I am still baking on!

My wife gave me a copy of Yotam Ottolenghi's book "Jerusalem", a great book if you like mediterrean food. Not so much about baking.

But having got over those impressive ingredients lists I realized that the recipes in there are quite easy to make, and very precise. I made the potato latkes (containing some parsnip) for the first day of Chanukkah, no photo because they disappeared too quickly. If you get a chance to look at this book - highly recommended.

Recently I had huge fun exploring the no-knead method - something I wanted to do for a while, and I made several doughs using this technique - withamazing results.

The ficelles in the title picture are my best baguette-style breads so far (flour 300g, water 200g, salt 6g, instant yeast 2g) 

Another very simple delicious bread is a pain-de-campagne style loaf (bread flour 900g, wholegrain rye 100g, water 680g, instant yeast 3g). After 3 hours proof with 5 folds the dough showed a lot of strength and bubbles, and was a charm to work with.

Here a picture just before putting it into the oven:

 

And here the finished product:

with a beautiful crumb:

Making a lot of "Bakery Challah" from "Inside The Jewish Bakery" left me with loads of eggwhite, so I made again a variation of Christophe Felder's Financiers (see e.g. http://www.petitebouffeentreamis.com/article-financiers-a-la-fraise-selon-christophe-felder-118536461.html)

using just almonds, a bit of coconut and honey:

They went down a treat at work and at home.

Then,it's time to make Dresdner Stollen.

I used nellapowers recipe

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/25407/dresden-christmas-stollen

Unfortunately many of the images have disappeared. Here some impressions from my baking session:

Lots of fruit ...

This is the stollen after being baked and brushed with butter. The caster sugar soaks up excess butter during cooling.

And this is the stollen, sugar brushed off and ready to be coated with icing sugar and packed for the big sleep.

It will emerge again at Christmas eve ...

Happy Baking,

Juergen

 

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Juergen Krauss

Tailrunner's recent post 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/35029/40-rye-60-spelt-ryw-and-whey

brought my attention back to a bread I posted about here

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/28855/spelt-beach

and which I hadn't made for a while.

This made myfingers itch, and I made a 1000g loaf using spelt biga with a tiny amount instant dry yeast, instead of adding the yeast to the final mix.

The result is a very fragrant, pleasing bread that goes especially well with cheeses.

The dough was less difficult to handle than I expected / remembered.

The formula on the second tab of  the Google sheet

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkcYHhPxccKtdFhkY1ZNMlR4VVc3ZmdwZGRWQjl1a2c&usp=sharing

and will also be published at the end of this post.

The process follows the single step detmolder published here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23830/german-baking-day

Here some pictures and notes about the process:

The two preferments, rye sour (100%HL) and spelt biga (60%HL)

The rye sour ripened for 16 hours, the biga for 5 hours.

The dough, withsome gluten development, after 2 minutes of slap-and-fold. Ready for the bulk proof:

The bulk proof takes about 1 hour at 26C, I stretched and folded twice.

The dough is a bit sticky and fragile, after shaping with a light hand left to proof in a basket:

The final proof takes about 50 minutes.

After this I turn the loaf out onto a peel sprinkled with semolina, and slash:

Baked with steam in a hot oven, starting at 240C, turned down after 15 minutes to 210C and baked for 20 more minutes, voila:

The crumb is quite closed, as usual with detmolder style breads.

And here the formula:

 

Bakers %

Weight (g)

Straight Dough

 

 

Wholegrain Rye flour

20

115

Light Rye flour

20

115

Light Spelt flour

60

345

Water

72

414

Salt

1.8

10.35

Yeast (IDY)

0.1

0.58

Yield

173.9

1,000

 

 

 

Rye Sour

 

 

Wholegrain Rye flour

20

115

Water

20

115

Mature Sour

2

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spelt Biga

 

 

Light Spelt Flour

20

115

Water

12

69

Yeast (IDY)

0.1

1

 

 

 

Final Dough

 

 

Light Rye flour

20

115

Light Spelt flour

40

230

Water

40

230

Salt

1.8

10.35

Spelt Biga

32.1

184.59

Rye Sour

40

230

Yield

173.9

1000

 

 
Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

The other evening I was watching the sweet dough episode of The Great British Bakeoff and when it got to the technical challenge (a product which the contestants don't know in advance and only basic directions are given) - Paul Hollywood's Apricot Couronne - my wife said: I WANT THAT.

This morning I downloaded the recipe

 http://thegreatbritishbakeoff.co.uk/paul-hollywoods-apricot-couronne-technical-challenge/

and made it.

A fairly easy enriched dough, an interesting filling and a stunning result.

Highly recommended.

Notably is the absence of sugar in the dough, all the sweetness comes from the filling, balancing texture and fruity taste very nicely.

Here some more pics:

 

Happy Baking,

Juergen

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Juergen Krauss

Here are some more photos of my 2Kg loaf:

Details of the challenge are here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/34915/challenge-all-multigrain-breads-fans

and my formula and process description are here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/34915/challenge-all-multigrain-breads-fans?page=1#comment-268885

Happy Baking,

Juergen

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Juergen Krauss

Quite often - especially during holiday times - spending time with my family can interfere with the optimal sourdough build schedules.

If we then run out of bread I usually make some improvisations based on Dan DiMuzio's Pain De Campagne (90% bread flour, 10% medium rye, 68% water, 2% salt, 0.3% instant yeast, from memory).

These breads are quick because they are same-day breads; but they still take about 5 hours from start to finish.

Two of these variations have been especially popular with my family:

The one pictured in the title photo is made using bread flour, medium rye and wholegrain wheat flours, plus toasted sesame oil.

This results in a very rich flavour and a moist crumb with a very light feel.

 The other bread uses a brown rice flour scald and high extraction wheat.

Both formulas use a bit more yeast than in the original formula, bulk proof for about 2 hours.

Here the formulas:

1. Sesame Mixed Flour Campagne (Ugh...)

 WeightBakers %
Bread Flour35070
Light Rye Flour5010
Wholegrain Wheat Flour10020
Salt102
Instant Yeast30.6
Water32064
Toasted Sesame Oil408
Yield873174.6

 

2. Rice Campagne

 Weight (g)Percent
Rice Scald  
Brown Rice Flour10020
Boiling Water30060
   
Final Dough  
High Extraction Wheat40080
Water10020
Salt102
Instant Yeast30.6
Rice Scald40080
Yield913182.6

Here a crumb shot of the Sesame Campagne

 

And here a picture of the Rice Campagne

 

Enjoy,

 

Juergen

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Juergen Krauss

Last Saturday was the "Treasure Island" summer fair at my son Benjanin's school, "Lewes New School", and as reported previously he volunteered me for a bread stall. The idea was that the children should make a major contribution to the fair, and I came to the conclusion, that I would let them bake bread from the Treasure Island times, and sell it at the fair.

By the way, the title photo is not "period bread", but my special take on Bo Friberg's Vanilla Butter Biscuits.

Back to the bread making.

After much research and some help from Ananda I settled for three kinds of breads, with slightly adapted formulas to fit the schedule.

You can find the formulas here, I added Ships Biscuits, of which I baked a daily sailor's ration to show at the fair.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RotlIxZvaL634QLINCnPRWO5kqFKZrgkEzLYjKxIHU0/edit?usp=sharing

The three breads are:

1. Pease Bread, a soured version of Horse Bread, my version uses equal parts of ground yellow split peas, barley and oats, and a tiny bit of sourdough starter of the same mixture. Probably the easiest sourdough to make, peas ferment like crazy. And there is no kneading or sophisticated shaping involved. The taste is quite strong and the crumb a bit crumbly. Excellent with some smoked meats, or with stews.

2. Maslin Bread, this is a bread similar to a German "Feinbrot", usually a mix of wholegrain rye with another grain, depending on the region. In Sussex it probably was wheat, but I used spelt instead because many of the folks at the school try to avoid wheat, for various reasons. I based the proportions on a 50:50 rye:spelt detmolder, with the addition of Ale Barm - now there is a special ingredient.

3. Manchet Bread, this was the posh white loaf of the day, made with Ale Barm and heavily worked, to get a fine, white crumb. I used old dough, with 50% of the final build being old dough. This made a soft, dense but creamy crumb. Delicious. And those hop notes from the barm coming through. Great.

How we did it: 

This is Benjamin with all the materials for the bake, on the way to school on Thursday Morning:

The Star Trek box contains his lunch... the other boxes flours and starters, Spock, ... It's life as we know it ...

Then I gave a little taster of the three breads Benjamin's class (15 kids, 1 teacher and 2 assistants) would make, and a little talk about the specifics of each of them.

This was my Manchet sample:

 We then set off to Harvey's Brewery

http://www.harveys.org.uk/

where our most kind hosts gave us a great tour around the brewery, with many insights into the process.

We sampled some malt and yeast, and smelled hops, and saw steam engines, mills, many different tanks and vessels, piped wort, and - what we came for - yeast! Ale Barm.

Here swimming on top of a few thousand litres of great ale to be:

We got our barm and carried it back to school, where the kids had other duties.

I stayed on, and mixed the preferments: Ale Barm dough with wheat and spelt for Manchet (I provided for 5 loaves of spelt manchet), rye sour for maslin, and the full dough for pease bread.

Here is the pyramid of preferments:

 

I was a bit worried about the size of the second container from the top, 

and I guess I was lucky - not too much spillage the next morning:

First thing on Friday Morning each child and adult decided on a slashing pattern so we could recognise or loaves after the bake.

Then we mixed the Manchet bread. Opening the box with the preferment set free great scents of hops and yeast, and the honeycomb structure created many "Aah.."s.

Kneading the dough and beating it with rolling pins was great fun. The kids didn't need much help, but the noise level in the classroom  was enormous. 

While the manchet was proofing we shaped the Pease Bread, slashed it right away, and I carried it to the kitchen, where the hot oven was waiting.

Next was shaping the manchets, everybody did really well.

Then the Pease breads came out of the oven. The colour here is influenced by the pink of the box:

Next was mixing the maslin. A rye dough. Great stickiness. 

Again, everybody was absolutely great, what I had to do most was scraping dough off little hands ....

The bowls are testimony to the stickiness of a rye rich dough:

After we put the maslin bread to rest it was time to slash the manchet and get it into the oven:

After that, and just before lunch, it was time to shape the maslin breads, another sticky experience,

Most of the young bakers understood well that swift and gentle handling of the dough was required at this stage.

I got a bunch of cheap wicker baskets (at Nesbits on Shaftesbury Avenue near Leicester Square, for the Londoners)  for the proofing.

During lunch I got the manchets out of the oven:

This oven is a gas oven with two shelves and no stones. It heats up to 250C, but with a load of 20 loaves it goes down below 150C and takes ages to recover.

Unfortunately I hadn't quite figured out how to make the best use of it, some breads got rather dark as a result. 

But the smell in the school kitchen was absolutely amazing and won me some customers and helpers for the fair.

Once the kids had their lunch and runaround and the teachers had their cup of tea we went on to turn out the maslins and slash them.

There was already an air of routine in the classroom.

These are the maslins in the oven:

By that time I had figured out how to juggle the heat, and the bake was slightly more even:

All that was left to do now was to tidy up and pack my tools.

Saturday was Treasure Island fair day, and a certain member of our family was so excited that we all had an early start ...

Lots of pirates started to gather, from far and near ...

... to - among various other things - buy Treasure Island Bread at my stall:

The manchet (white bread!) sold out first, but we managed to sell all our 56 loaves!

A great experience, all in all.

 Thanks again to Edmund Jenner and colleagues from Harvey's Brewery in Lewes for all their support (and a cask of ale), 

and to the Head and the teachers at Lewes New School to support this whole project wih lots of enthusiasm.

Cheers,

Juergen

 

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Yay, That's It! Or so.

/* Update: Photos of the finished panned loaf at the end */

This is the crumb I am looking for! Quinoa sourdough bread, gluten free!

Unfortunately -

closer to the centre of the bread I get this crumb:

The gummy bit near the bottom tells me that something is wrong with my baking. Right now I have another Quinoa loaf in the oven, panned, on a lower heat. We'll see what happens.

But first about the bread above.

The formula is on this Google spreadsheet:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkcYHhPxccKtdEVQSXJJUWt4ZVdQa044dlkyQzhNZ2c&usp=sharing

or here in cleartext:

Quinoa Sourdough #1
   
Expected Yield600 
Factor2.521008403 
   
 Bakers %Weight
Straight Dough  
Quinoa60151.26
Tapioca2050.42
Potato Starch2050.42
Psyllium615.13
Salt25.04
Water130327.73
Yield238600.00
   
Psyllium Soaker  
Psyllium615.13
Water100252.10
   
Quinoa Sour  
Quinoa3075.63
Water3075.63
Mature Quinoa Sour615.13
   
Final Dough  
Quinoa3075.63
Tapioca2050.42
Potato Starch2050.42
Salt25.04
Psyllium Soaker106267.23
Water00.00
Quinoa Sour60151.26
Yield238600.00

The quinoa sour ripened for about 8 hours at room temperature. The mix is quite quick, once the ingredients (photo below) are well incorporated and the mass gets smoother we're done.

Shaping works best with wet hands. I wanted to proof and bake this loaf freestanding - maybe not the greatest idea. 

The bread proofed on a baking sheet for about 1.5 hours.

It then baked in a preheated oven (240C) on a baking stone, the oven was turned down to 210C immediately. Baking time 50 minutes.

Here a photo of the finished loaf (1100g), glazed with potato starch roux just before and after the bake:

It spread considerably, turned out tobe quite flat and sank even more in the middle while cooling. You saw the crumb in the photos above.

I had similar issues with the Black Bread from ITJB, which makes me now believe that the fault is in my baking process.

I think that this very wet bread drains my baking stone of heat faster than my oven manages to replenish it, with the net effect of undercooked bottoms. I don't have this issue with drier, well aired breads.

Therefore I started another bake, same formula.

This time I took the quinoa sour a bit earlier, after 5 hours. It tasted and smelled more fruity at that point.

This time I panned the loaf (500g) and proofed at 26C for 2.5 hours, see the following photos.

The panned loaf:

And here the proofed loaf:

This loaf is in the oven right now, starting at 210C. After 30 minutes I turned it down to 175C. I intend to bake well over one hour.

Stay tuned.

Juergen

/* Update */

Almost there. 

I baked this loaf, starting at 210C, finishing at 175C, fot about 80 minutes. After 60 minutes I unpanned the loaf.

After torning off the oven I let it cool in the oven for another hour.

The crust was very beautifully brown and crisp

but for Quinoa almost at the burnt side.

After unpanning the sides of the loaf started to cave in. You will notice it in the crumb shot, where there are some gummy patches.

 

All in all I am very pleased with my progress. For Quinua I will try baking longer at even lower temperatures. I might also try reducing hydration a bit. 130% seemed to be OK for the yeasted variant, but the sourdough feels quite different.

 

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