The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Blogs

JoeVa's picture
JoeVa

Ecco l'ultimo pane con Buratto (solo lievito naturale liquido). Il precedente è stato un clamoroso fallimento, si poteva mangiare ma ...


Here tha last loaf with Buratto flour (only liquid levain). The previous one was a failure, I mean you could eat that loaf but ...


     Dsc04181-small


Ho notato che lavorare con questa farina, ed in generale con alcune farine biologiche, non è sempre facile; in particolare bastano 2°C in meno, l'assenza di 1% di farina maltata e qualche punto di idratazione per cambiare radicalmente le cose.


I noticed that working with this flour, and in general with some organic flours, it's not always easy; just 2°C less than optimal, the absence of 1% malt (diastatic) and few points of hydration could radically change the result.


In conclusione:



  • Temperatura finale impasto (e lievitazione) 27-28°C

  • Consistenza impasto molle (nel mio caso 80-83%)

  • 1% farina maltata


In conclusion:
  • Dough temperature (and bulk proofing) 27-28°C
  • Soft dough consistency  (in my case 80-83%)
  • 1% malt

     Dsc04188-small

PS: per gli americani, settimana scorsa ho provato la vostra "King Arthur All Purpose Flour". Ho fatto un un impasto diretto con lievito di birra fresco (ricetta di base Un-Kneaded Six fold French Bread - J.Hamelman) e per ottenere la stessa consistenza dell'impasto ho usare circa un 78% di acqua. Usando lievito naturale liquido forse dovrei aggiustare con qualche punto di idratazione in meno. Una buona farina per pane, non eccessivamente forte e piuttosto bilanciata.

PS: and for americans bakers, last week I tried your "King Arthur All Purpose Flour". I mixed a basic direct dough with fresh yeast (base receipt Un-Kneaded Six fold French Bread - J.Hamelman) and to get the same consistency I used about 78% of water. With liquid levain maybe I had to adjust that few % point down. I think it is a good basic white bread flour, not too strong and quite balanced.

amolitor's picture
amolitor

I am very pleased with my oven spring and grigne and all that business, so here's a new blog post! This is a trifle underproofed, but I rather like the dramatic look of the thing.


 Poolish:



  1. 1/2 cup medium rye flour

  2. 1/2 cup bread flour

  3. pinch of yeast


Let sit out overnight (8-12 hours, more if it's cooler, less if it's warmer)


Dough:



  1. 1 and 1/8 cup warm water, added to poolish

  2. Sufficient bread flour to make a moist dough, around 66% hydration


Mix until it comes together well, let rest half an hour (autolyze), then add:



  1. 2 1/4 tsp salt


and knead until windowpanes or whatever your prefered test is.


Bake at 450F for 40 minutes, with steam at the beginning.


ph_kosel's picture
ph_kosel

I made a loaf of SF Sourdough for an Easter brunch, following Peter Reinhart's recipe in his book Artisan Bread Every Day.  In the past I've had extremely good luck with Reinhart's SF  Sourdough recipe in his other book Crust and Crumb but my supply of "mother starter" was a bit low and the recipe in Artisan Bread Every Day only calls for two ounces while the one in Crust and Crumb asks for .  Besides, I've been wanting to try the recipe in Artisan Bread Every Day anyway.


I mixed up the intermediate"wild yeast starter" Friday, the dough Saturday, and baked the loaf Sunday morning (keeping the starter and dough each overnight in the fridge between times). When I mixed up the dough it seemed too wet (perhaps I messed up the weights, I was working under pressure); the recipe says adjust consistency as needed so I added more flour until it seemed about right.  I fridged the dough up in a stainless bowl with a tight plastic lid.  I was a bit worried it might rise too much and pop the lid off but fridge space was limited.  In the morning the lid was, indeed, bulging a bit but it hadn't popped off.


I chose to just use all the dough to make a single big "miche" loaf because I didn't want to risk degassing the dough too much by dividing it.  It was probably the biggest loaf I've ever baked.


Here are photos of the result:



Loaf^



Crumb


The loaf looks pretty good, and my wife and our guests seemed to like it quite a bit, but I found the taste and texture less satisfactory, less "yummy", than loaves I baked back in January using the recipe from Reinhart's Crust and Crumb.


 


Here's a photo from back in January:



Loaves and crumb from January 2011^


The more varied and irregular holes in the crumb of the January loaves is fairly obvious.  Not visible is a difference in taste and mouth-feel.  The January loaves as I recall were a bit moister, more tender perhaps, and had better taste.


I'm a bit bemused by the difference and curious about the cause.  The recipes are very similar, and the "mother culture" is the same.  One thing different is that in January I used King Arthur Unbleached Bread Flour while in the current loaf I used a less expensive generic unbleached bread flour I got at the local Food Maxx market - both have the same labeled protein content.  The loaves in January included a bit of brown sugar in the dough per the Crust and Crumb recipe while the current loaf did not.  The January loaves were made exactly by weight according to the recipe while the latest included additional flour which I "eyeballed".  I'm not sure but I think there was a tad more salt in the January loaves.  Finally, the January loaves were retarded overnight "uncontrained" under plastic wrap while the current dough was retarded in a bowl with a tight fitting lid which restrained it's expansion.


Anyway, the two sourdough bakes tasted quite different to me, although others say they found the current effort highly satisfactory.  Go figure!

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello,
I tried making sourdough semolina this weekend, after getting some pointers and help from Franko (Thanks, Franko!).

I mixed up a batch of dough, enough to make 4 big loaves, and was happy to have this opportunity to practice scoring.



The scoring on the top loaf was on a whim, wanting to see how diamond scoring would look on a batard.
The scoring on the left loaf was inspired by something I saw on The Back Home Bakery’s video, “Three Breads from Start to Finish” (0:57 mark). I am grateful for all of the helpful information in Mark’s videos, including the batard shaping in this one (Thanks, Mark!). 
The scoring on the right loaf was on another whim, trying for “basketweave” scoring (thinking of Easter baskets this weekend!).


 The shaping on this loaf was an attempt at an “Easter egg” shape.
The scoring was to try to replicate something I saw in the second photo David shared in his post about his
Artisan II class at SFBI (the small, dark oval loaf, at front, second from left). The cuts on the SFBI loaf opened up so beautifully; I hope to try this one again, to get a result more like the SFBI loaf.
There are a wealth of scoring ideas in that post of David’s. (Thanks, David!)

Happy baking everyone,
from breadsong


   

Mebake's picture
Mebake

 


This is my second attempt at this recipe, my first attempt is HERE. I'am very content, as this is the best Pain Au levain i've baked so far. I've made changes to the Recipe and procedures as compared to the earlier attempt. The changes were:


1 - I increased the % of prefermented flour from 15% to around 20% (THANK YOU ANDY!)


2 - I was meticulous about the last 3 refreshments of the starter prior to building my levain (THANK YOU LARRY!)


3 - I used an all white starter, instead of the Mixed flour starter i used earlier.


4 - I stretched and folded (letter-wise) on a bench instead of in the bowl, twice.


5 - I milled the sea salt to a fine powder.


6 - I did not include a freshly milled WW flour, instead, i used a strong WW flour.


7 - I made sure the final dough temperature was 76F or 25C, by means of immersing my hands to mix the dough, which gave warmth to the dough.


8 - I patted down the dough to redistribute the fermentation bubbles after initial fermentation.


9 - I steamed the oven for 10 minutes, as the bread started taking color quickly.


10 - The doughs fermented exactly as per the book instructions, i.e. 5 hours Total fermentation.


11 - I divided the dough into two 1.5 lb pieces.


And this is how the breads turned out!






The flavor was Superb, with subltle acidity, and wheaty aroma from the wholewheat. This is a keeper.


khalid

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

These decorated sugar cookies were fun to make and flew away quickly after a lovely family Easter dinner.


 


                 


 


                         Happy Easter, 


                               Sylvia


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Onceuponamac's picture
Onceuponamac

Happy with the oven spring here :) I've been struggling to get cuts I'm satisfied with the disposable razor blade on a stick idea, so I decided to find an old straight blade razor (think what a barber would have used years ago).. I found one and had much better results - I've often admired Della Fattoria's breads (rosemary lemon, in particular) and have wondered how they cut the designs in the top.  I find when I use the disposable blade on the stick - the edge of the blade occasionally get's caught when I'm making a cut and tears the bread slightly. Using the straight blade razor worked great - it will be my new method of choice - now I just need to learn how to sharpen the blade on a leather strap.


 


proth5's picture
proth5

 Well, you know.


Although I went into some detail with my panned bread recipe (which has stabilized at my last published formula (or can get snazzed up with the addition of 12-15% each of toasted chopped walnuts and prunes) I've been working up other formulas and channeling Richard Blais - ever unhappy with my baguettes -  I have been tweaking formulas that others might call successful.


Last weekend things seemed to go well.


My first bake was a variation on the "Bear-guettes" formula where I took the hydration up to a (for me) stratospheric 70%.  I was unhappy with the results of the non retarded dough, but given a long cold stay in the refrigerator and then warmed up at room temperature for a couple of hours, the dough was supple and easy to handle.


I always cut a baguette in half and then in half lengthwise as a drive time snack for my faithful limo driver and when I saw it, I just had to take a quick snap as I ran out the door to catch my plane.



The formula is simplicity itself. (In my browser I do not seem to be able to create the all important borders and shading, so I am breaking up these formulas into non-standard format)


 

Overall formula

Baker's Percent

Total Flour

36.9 oz

100%

AP Flour

36.9 oz

85%

Water

25.83 oz

70%

Salt

0.66 oz

2%

Yeast

0.060 oz

0.165%

Seed

 .37 oz

20%

 

 

 

Total Wt

36.9%

 

 

Pre ferments

 

Poolish

Baker's Percent

Levain

Baker's Percent

 

% flour

10%

%Flour

5%

AP Flour

3.69

100%

1.845

100%

Water

3.69

100%

1.845

100%

Salt

 

 

 

 

Yeast

 pinch

 

 

 

Seed

0.738

20%

0.369

20%

Poolish total wt

7.38

 

 

 

Levain total wt

 

 

4.059

 

 

Hand mix.

Allow 12-14 hours to ripen.

Final dough

 

Final Dough

 

 

AP Flour

31.365 oz

Water

20.1105 oz

Salt

0.6642 oz

Yeast

0.060885 oz

Seed

 

Poolish

7.38 oz

Levain

4.059 oz

 

Mix to shaggy mass and autolyse for 45 minutes.

Mix in spiral (or by hand) to moderate development  - 3 minutes.

Allow to stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Refrigerate overnight. (I actually divide this into 2 baguette sized chunk to allow it to warm more quickly in the morning)

 Remove from refrigerator.

Allow to warm to room temperature (2-3 hours)

Divide (I divide into 6 pieces)

Pre shape round

Shape baguette

Proof 1.25- 1.5 hours

Score

Bake with steam 5 minutes at 500F then 12 minutes at 460F with convection.

The other formula I have been working on I describe as "Country Bread."  While the classic baguette limits us to a very strict list of ingredients and shapes, I wanted to make a bread that had a more varied list of ingredients and perhaps a different shape.

One thing that I began to think about was making a bread with a more distinct sour flavor.  My levain lives "free range" and is fed at least once a day. My house sitter feeds it when I am away and it does not undergo the indignity of being left in a refrigerator until it is cold and sad and creates hooch.  As a result, it is a very mild levain.  What I found out was that by using it with a rye pre ferment, I could get a sour flavor.  I finally got a formula to my liking which is presented below.

Overall formula

 

Overall formula

Baker's Percent

Total Flour

37.5 oz

100%

Bread Flour

28.125 oz

75%

Rye Flour

3.75 oz

10%

Whole Wheat

5.625 oz

15%

Water

24.75 oz

66%

Salt

0.50625 oz

2%

Yeast

 

 

Seed

0.5625 oz

 

Poolish

 

 

Rye Levain

 

 

Total Wt

63.31875 oz

 

 

Note that I am using Bread Flour - this does not work as well with all purpose flour - even King Arthur All Purpose

Both my rye and whole wheat flours are freshly ground.

Pre ferments

 

Rye Levain

Baker's Percent

Whole wheat poolish

Baker's Percent

% flour pre fermented

 

 10%

 

 5%

 

 

 

 

 

Rye Flour

3.75 oz

100%

 

 

Whole Wheat

 

 

1.875 oz

100%

Water

4.875 oz

130%

1.875 oz

100%

Salt

 

 

 

 

Yeast

 

 

Pinch

 

Seed

0.5625 oz

20%

 

 

Wheat  poolishwt

 

 

3.75 oz

 

Rye Levain wt

 9.1875 oz

 

 

 

 

Mix by hand and allow to mature 12-14 hours

Final Dough

 

Final Dough

 

 

Bread Flour

28.125 oz

Rye Flour

 

Whole Wheat

3.75 oz

Water

18 oz

Salt

0.50625 oz

Yeast

 

Seed

 

Poolish

3.75 oz

Rye Levain

9.1875

 

 

Note that there is no additional yeast - this is not a typo...

Mix to shaggy mass and autolyse 45 minutes.

Mix with spiral for 7 minutes to good gluten development

Bulk ferment 5 hours total - one fold at 2.5 hours

Divide (I make 3 pieces)

Pre shape rounds

Shape batards

1.5 hours proof.

Score.

Bake with steam 10 minutes at 480F and then 20 minutes at 460F with convection.

The photo...

 

Last, but not least, I was looking over my old formula spreadsheet and comparing it to the BBGA standard.  My old spreadsheet took the amount of the seed used in the levain into account as part of the % of flour pre fermented - the BBGA standard does not. While this keeps the math much simpler, it causes the actual amounts of flour pre fermented to be understated vs. my method.

I've been thinking quite a bit about the impact of my altitude on baked goods in general and decided to drop the amount of flour pre fermented in my baguettes to  7% in the polish and 5% in the levain.

Frankly, I wasn't quite happy with the timings on this formula (which had me loading the oven at 9PM after an 8 AM start on the mix) but the results were nice without having to do a retarded ferment.  I may be on to something...

I'll leave the formula as a math exercise for the reader  (and those of you who bake at lower than Mile High altitudes may wish to skip this entirely), but here is the money shot...

 

I have a list of formulas that I want to develop this year and for the next bit I will be working on multigrain and "seedy/nutty" bread.  We'll see how that goes.

dvuong's picture
dvuong

I have always loved Pretzels.  Nothing brought more joy to me than walking through the mall and stopping off at Wetzels Pretzels or Auntie Anne's and grabbing a fresh, warm, soft, and chewy pretzel to devour.  The scent wafting from Cinnabon could never win me over the smells of a freshly baked pretzel.


I decided to try Alton Brown's recipe that resulted in one of the best pretzels I've ever had.  I'm not sure I've ever had a true german pretzel but this certainly blows mall pretzels out of the water.  The best part?  It was a really easy bake!


 


I also felt like something sweet and nutty so I pulled out BBA and found Cranberry Walnut Celebrationd Bread.  It seemed to fit the bill perfectly.

 

Onceuponamac's picture
Onceuponamac

I regularly use and SP5 Micro Spiral mixer, I've had good results with it, but as others have noted, for high hydration doughs - it's usually better to use the double hydration method.  I purchased mine from TMB Baking south of San Francisco and they are extremely helpful.  Although, it's often reported to be made by "Esmach" it's actually made by Avancini - an Italian cooking equipment manufacturer.  I recently had a chance to use a Haussler Alpha spiral mixer.  The mixer looks almost identical to the SP5, however, it has a tilting head and a removable bowl.  I haven't had that much trouble cleaning the SP5- you just pour some water in and after dissolving any remaining dough, you wipe it out clean.  Obviously, because of the tilting head and removable dough - the cleaning process is much more expedient with the Haussler.  


What really surprised me, however, is that it typically takes about 5-6 minutes to get good dough cohesion with the SP5.  When using the Haussler, the dough cohesion was achieved in less than 4 minutes, which was quite amazing.  Of course, the conditions weren't scientifically identical, but I was making Tartine's basic country dough recipes and within 100 miles of the location I typically bake, so certainly substantially similar in terms of climate, ingredients, etc.


If I get a chance, I would like to try making brioche in the Haussler, the Tartine Brioche recipe is quite wet, and I have use the double hydration method with this dough in the SP5.  I'm wondering if the Haussler could achieve cohesion without having to use the double hydration method.  I haven't measured the revolutions per minute with either machine - so I'm not sure if there is any difference there either. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs