The Fresh Loaf

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PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

What with having dinner guests on Saturday and more coming on Monday, it was a wonderful excuse for puttering around in the kitchen this weekend.  I started with Pain au Levain from Leader's Local Breads Saturday morning and followed with Rich and Tender Dinner Rolls from The King Arthur Flour 200th Anniversary Cook Book and finished up with a Chocolate / Chocolate Chip cake, source unknown.  


Having posted about the Pain au Levain previously, I won't go into detail about the process here.  This bread is consistenly good, in both outcome and flavor.  This bake resulted in lovely oven spring and big ears, in spite of some rather deficient scoring.  It hasn't been cut yet, so I don't know about the crumb but the exterior suggests that the interior ought to be good.


The dinner rolls were a typical enriched roll, with butter, eggs, sugar and milk.  The two differences that set it apart from most such rolls was the addition of some whole wheat, maybe 20%, and no refrigeration.  The former was a pleasant addition in flavor and the latter was a real convenience since I was a bit pressed for time.  I just shaped them as simple pan rolls.  As the name suggested, they were rich and tender and a good accompaniment with dinner.


The cake was a bit over the top (which won't stop us from making it again!), what with a cup of butter, 4 ounces of melted chocolate, 5 eggs and buttermilk in the batter.  Oh, and chocolate chips, too.  My wife halved the frosting recipe (it called for 5-1/2 cups of confectioners/icing sugar), since we baked it in a 9x13 pan instead of in 3, 9-inch round cake pans.  This is not a light and airy cake.  It is moist, it is heavy, and it is sweet!  Good stuff, in other words.  Best of all, with others to help eat it, the danger of too much snacking on the leftovers is reduced.


Before going to bed Saturday night, I mixed a biga for Portugese Sweet Bread.  Today I finished the bread, shaped it as hamburger buns and baked it.  Now we have the base for some barbecue sandwiches for our guests Monday evening.  I've learned that the store-bought buns just don't stand up well to the sauce that comes along with the barbecue, so something like PSB is less likely to go all floppy in mid-bite while still being tender.


No pics of anything described here.  Just lots of enjoyment in both the baking and the eating.


Paul

siuflower's picture
siuflower

where in Dallas, Tx to buy bulk flour (50 lb), good quality whole wheat and bread flour?


 


siuflower

JoeVa's picture
JoeVa

In my previous post "Golosaria 2009 & Petra Lab" I wrote about Petra flour from Molino Quaglia. I said I'd like to try conTuttoIlGrano, the (very) whole version of Petra.


                                                                                


And now, my very first test with conTuttoIlGrano! You can read about these flours in my previous post but I want to give you more details about conTuttoIlGrano. "con-tutto-il-grano" means "with-the-whole-grain" and I think this is a perfect name. The flour is stone milled, GMO free (not organic), it has 80% whole wheat flour and the other 20% is wheat flakes, toasted germ and bran ... a whole whole wheat flour!


I baked a simple sourdough bread, here the main points:



  • 25% Petra1 + 75% Petra conTuttoIlGrano

  • 25% pre-fermented flour (100% hydration liquid levain), I used Petra1 flour.

  • 62% overall hydration

  • Short mix with S&F

  • Retarded in proof


          [The loaf]


         


         [The crumb]


         
         
         


And here the information from the bag (you can see the high resolution version on my zoomr page, just click on the photo then on the "lens" and select the original size). One side of the bag describe a formula with a yeasted biga. If you do the easy calculations the suggested hydration is 70% (maybe 68% if the dough is retarded). For sure this flour can go up to this high hydration (even more if you use a stiff 45% hydration biga that adds a lot of strength to the final dough) but I think this is not a must.


DSC03631 DSC03633 DSC03632


Yesterday I was reasoning about my oven + covered steam method and I think (maybe I'm wrong) the cover traps a lot of steam, sometimes too much steam. This could be a problem with high hydration dough (heart baked) because they need less steam but when covered they free even more stream than a stiffer one: result flat loaves. Ok, you can say don't use the cover with this dough but I wasn't so bravo to get a proper steaming with my crazy oven.


Conclusion: a great whole wheat flour. The loaf is perfect even if I think my starter doesn't like the "all in one" switch on Petra1.


Next loaf ... Pane Petra di Campagna?

welling's picture
welling

I'm not a professional baker but i have been successfully baking as an amateur for a couple of years now. In this time I have learned a few basics, such as that strong white flour can absorb water of 60% of the flour weight (approximately). That is, 3/8 water to 5/8 flour. I know that this is flour dependent, but only within a couple of percent.


Today i tried to use the Bourke Street Bakery Cookbook to make simple white pizza dough. The recipe called for 600g flour and 445ml liquid (water, milk, oil). This equates to 74% liquid to flour weight. Needless to say, the dough resembled a batter and required several handfuls of flour to bring back to workable dough.


I normally use a Ciabatta dough for my pizza bases, so I am quite used to working with a wet dough, but this was rediculous. Luckily I have enough experience to know what to look for, but others may not be so fortunate. I will be interested to see how other recipes from this book work out.


I am keen to hear other's thoughts and experiences with this book.

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

I saw Floyd's posting on this recipe.  Wanted to try out.  I also saw some seeded recipes,  and wanted to add in the seeds. I need some advice here,  as the the bread turned out a little dense - see the crumb below.




Ingredients:
Preferment
125g All Purpose Flour 85g water 2.5g salt 2g yeast
Day 1:  Mix all and leave rise for 1 hour,  then refrigerate it overnight.
Final Dough
350g Bread Flour 225g water 40g extra virgin olive oil 5g rosemary leaves (I used dried) 7.5g salt 2.5g yeast All of the preferment
Seeds (I added these in as I wanted a seeded bread)
50g Sunflower seed  20g Sesame seeds
Bake sunflower seed for 15 minutes in oven at 150 degree celsius. Turn the seeds occasionally. Fry sesame seeds for about 5 minutes over fire.  Stir constantly till brown.  Put in a bowl and cover overnight.

Day 2:  Mix dough first,  and add in preferment,  knead well.  I added the seeds last after I've kneaded the dough well. Mix the dough and seeds well together. (Should I have waited after the 1st rise to add in the seeds?)
Rising/Proofing:  Rise for 1 1/2 hours, (Floyd suggest a 3 hour bulk rising with 2 folds,  which I should have followed).  1 fold and shape.  Proof for 1 1/2 hours. (The dough have doubled well,  my first rise should have been longer??)
Bake:  Steam the oven at 250 degrees celsius,  and  bake at 230 degrees celsius for 50 minutes,  and bring down the temperature to 200 degree celsius for 20 minutes.  (did I bake a little too long?)
Looking for some advice please?
Jenny

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,


Just wanted to share with you all my bake from today...  Lots of stuff to share.  On the left side is just a sourdough bread that is similar to the Pane Casereccio di Genzano from Dan Leader's Local Breads...  The other two are 90% rye breads from Hamelman's Bread.  For the rye breads, I freshly hand milled organic rye berries for each of the steps using the Detmolder process.  I just used my storage stiff sourdough starter to start the rye sours...  The last 2 photos are some sandwiches that basically contain all my girlfriend's favorite ingredients: smoked salmon, avocado, mango, fresh mozzarella, and mesclun.  Strange combo, but we learned about this combo at Le Petite Abeille in NYC...  Enjoy!


Tomorrow I'll post some crumbshots of the rye bread as Hamelman recommends letting the bread rest for at least 24 hours for the crumb to stabilize...


Tim


Edit: Rye bread pics are up...  We made some toast with cream cheese, smoked salmon, and herring...  Yum!









90% Rye Bread (Based on Hamelman’s 90% Rye from Bread)


 


Rye Sour #1


26g Organic Rye Berries (freshly ground)


24g Firm Sourdough Starter (60% hydration)


50g Water


100g Total


 


Rye Sour #2


200g Organic Rye Berries (freshly ground)


156g Water


50g Rye Sour #1


226g Total


 


Rye Sour #3


290g Organic Rye Berries (freshly ground)


290g Water


226g Rye Sour #2


806g Total


 


Final Dough


580g Organic Rye Berries (freshly ground)


110g Bread Flour


476g Water


20g Kosher Salt


1 tsp ADY


806g Rye Sour #2


1996g Total


 


Instructions:


Evening of Day 1


6:50pm – Measure out ingredients for Rye Sour #1, grind rye berries, mix all in bowl, cover with plastic wrap, rest on counter.


11:50pm - Measure out ingredients for Rye Sour #2, grind rye berries, mix all in bowl, cover with plastic wrap, rest on counter.



Morning of Day 2


8:30am - Measure out ingredients for Rye Sour #3, grind rye berries, mix all in bowl, cover with plastic wrap, rest on counter.


11:45am - Measure out ingredients for final dough, grind rye berries, mix all in bowl with wooden spoon.  Do not touch this dough with your hands.  Just mix it well, and smooth it over with a wet spoon. Cover with plastic wrap, rest on counter. For 30 minutes.


12:15pm – Divide into 2 equal pieces.  Flour your work surface, shape into boule, place into linen lined banneton seam side down.  Proof for 1 hour.  Place 2 stones in oven on different levels, along with seam pan.  Preheat to 550F with convection.


1:15pm – Turn boules out onto lightly floured peel, dock if desired with chopstick or skewer, place in oven directly on stone.  When all loaves are in, add 1 cup of water to steam pan, close door, turn oven down to 480F, no convection, bake for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes, rotate loaves, turn oven down to 410F.  Bake for another 60 minutes, rotating and switching loaves between stones halfway through.  Loaves are done when internal temp reaches 210F.  Cool loaves completely and let rest for 24 to 36 hrs before cutting.


Notes: I did not go through the 15-24hr fermentation for rye sour build #2 as per Hamelman's instructions.  My attempt was not very sour tasting, which for me is good.  Also, I should have let the loaf rest for the full 24 hrs before cutting.  It was a little gummy, but this was quickly resolved by toasting...  Also, I have the small iron hand crank mill that Gerard Rubaud uses to grind...


 


 


 


 

 

 

varda's picture
varda

I have been baking bread like crazy over the last three months.   I've tried a lot of things, I've received a lot of great advice in the forums, many breads haven't worked very well since I am so inexperienced, but now I have a list of breads that either came out pretty well or I hope that with more practice will eventually turn out pretty well.   In order to consolidate what I've learned so far, I will try to bake a bread a day (or so) with seven breads that I would like to get right.   I'll start with the easiest, and since it is also quite delicious, I'll call it the best per amount of effort:   Greenstein's Milk Bread.   In Secrets of a Jewish Baker, Greenstein gives two recipes for this - one with a sponge, one without.   The one I made today was with a straight dough method.   This means you just mix everything up, let rise, shape, rise, and bake.   No pre-ferment, no cold ferment, no sourdough no nothing.   And for bread, a fairly short time from start to finish.  


Mix 2 cups warm warm water with 1.5 Tbsp instant yeast.   Add 5 cups unbleached bread flour (I used a measurement of 133 g per cup).  Add 2 Tbsp soft butter, 4 tsp sugar, 2/3 cup dry milk, 2 tsp salt.   Mix it up until smooth.   Let double.  Cut in half.   Let rest for 15 minutes.   Shape and put in bread pans.  Let rise to over top of pan.   Score and brush with melted butter.  Bake with steam for 40 minutes at 375.   Remove from pan for last 5 minutes of baking and put directly on stone.


Tomorrow Madame Doz Pain de Compagne from Bernard Clayton.

ananda's picture
ananda

 


Taking Part in a Baking Competition


Way back in early January, not long after I first started posting on TFL, I found an invitation in my e-mails to compete in what becomes the baking world cup: La Coupe du Monde de Bolangerie, next taking place in 2012..


At the international qualification stage, this is known as the Louis Lesaffre Cup http://www.coupelouislesaffre.com/ with the European part set to take place in Paris in 2011.   This sounded quite interesting, so I thought I'd give it a go.   An e-mail enquiry suggested I would have to make baguettes, a tinned loaf, and a speciality loaf of my own.   I decided to give it a go, thinking the UK heats were to be held in May, or, June.   By that time my teaching commitments will be less, and I should have completed the second module for my MSc in Food policy.   So, I entered.


I didn't hear anything more for a few weeks, except confirmation that I was the first applicant, but I would definitely be taking part.   Right at the beginning of March I received a phone call from Nick Townend of BFP Wholesale [yeast company owned by Lesaffre here in the UK], informing me the Competition was set for sometime between the 20th and 24th March, at the NEC in Birmingham, live at the Baking Industry Exhibition.   Let's just say that this event is HUGE!   I'm in the midst of trying to get an assignment complete for my MSc, and I'm already behind schedule, needing a week's extension.   Also, I'd put no plans in place to publicise my plans and score some publicity for Newcastle College, where I lecture.


OK; well I'd better not panic, it'll be just fine, I resolve!   Better get some practice in, and, sort out some materials.   I contacted my colleagues in Kent [see: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16151/working-french-flour ]and they agreed to post up 10kg of their wonderful T65 Campteclair Farine de Tradition.   I knew this would be a score on the competition, and had no problem getting permission from the judges to use this flour.   I'd put in quite a lot of work to develop a Caraway Rye Bread with Blackstrap Molasses [see: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16273/carawy-rye-bread-black-strap-molasses-superwet-ciabatta-too ] and thought this would be a great choice for my own loaf.   For the tinned bread, I had plans to use a seed soaker with a mix of wholemeal and white bread flours.


Then the Rules were finally published on the 12th March!   Baguettes were indeed required.   One dough using 7kg of flour; half of this to make traditional hand moulded baguettes, the other half to process through a moulding machine.   Finished weight of 240g, I calculated this would give me 36 baguettes!   And, I'd only got 10kg of flour in the first place.   I double-checked, but was told I could only make one dough.   I thought I may get away with a dough using Campteclair for the traditional baguettes, then another dough using industrial flour T55 for the machined products.   No go on this.   Tinned loaves:   3 x 800g finished weight of White Farmhouse, White Sandwich Tin, and Wholemeal.   You can't get much more ordinary than this, but I knew I could at least use sponge and dough methods to get some interesting flavours.   The loaf of choice was also something of a letdown.   Clearly the judges had made moves to keep the competition as "English" as possible...you can all draw your own conclusions on what that implies!   Two from Cottage, Bloomer and Cob loaves; 3 x 800g and 400g finished weights; all white flour.   A minimum of 1 hour bulk ferment was stipulated, but no mention made of overnight fermentation.   For all these products, Lesaffre bread improvers were available, as were their dry sour preparations!!


Well, I was starting to feel somewhat disheartened by now; seriously I was thinking I should pull out.   But a hotel room was booked and paid for by Lesaffre, and I was just about psyched up for the competition side of the whole event.   I needed to talk to some colleagues, big-style.   Thank you to Eric Hanner of TFL who from this point on was of sterling support.   My line manager at work also stepped up and gave me loads of positives.   It was great to have word from Jeffrey Hamelman, explaining some of the rationale behind aspects of the rules [he will be judging in Paris, I guess], but also obviously uninspired by the English choices of bread available to me.


So I frantically began e-mailing through to Nick Townend, establishing whatever I could to know it would all work on the day.   Quite why I had thought the event was in May/June, I really have no idea at all now.   I did 3 days of test baking on 15th, 16th and 17th March, in my bakery kitchen, but teaching a host of different classes at the same time; so, it was extremely stressful, and not all my products turned out how I wanted them.   Still, I had a load of notes, and the confidence in the methods used and my own knowledge and skill to believe I had everything there to make it all work over the upcoming weekend.


I had a trip to Nottinghamshire on Thursday 18th March to visit "The School of Artisan Food".   I had a table seat reserved on the train, so spent the 4 hours tapping away on my wife's laptop to complete all the recipe/formula and methods for each of the breads I was going to make.   I had a great day out visiting what is a wholly exciting new venture, and, I got all this planning work completed too.


Back to College on Friday, to teach a practical baking class, and gather a whole load of equipment and materials together to take to Birmingham.   I slept badly on Friday night, and was up by 5am tapping away on my pc, and catching up with the latest from Eric to help me through.   The drive to Birmingham is over 250 miles from where we live in the very far north of England.   We made very good time, and checked in to the hotel by mid afternoon.   My wife, Alison, went shopping, and I went off to the NEC to make my starter doughs for the next day.


I arrived at the NEC, eventually checked into the right Exhibition Hall with all my stuff, and it was bedlam.   Everyone was working like crazy to have the Hall set up for the next day.   Our "live area" was hardly in any state at all.   There was no baguette moulder, and the equipment available was not really set up, and we had to share it with the Bakels/Rondo team doing live demonstrations in the same cordon.   Well, no machine-moulded baguettes anyway.   Having met all the co-ordinators who were supporting us, the 3 competitors, we then had one hour to make all our overnight ferments.   I had 4 to make!


Anyway, mission accomplished and back to the hotel.   Alison and I made an exit from the hotel to a decent restaurant, so we could get a break from all things bakery competition for a while at least.   I drank just a few beers, and ate some good food, but we went straight to bed on return.   I had an early rise, as the Competition kicked off at 7am.


We were there early and away by 06:50, with 8 hours to complete all our loaves.   Counting against all of us was the equipment.   One of the ovens was low-crown, and we had a lot of tinned breads to make; there was a massive shortage of proving space; we had only one spiral mixer between the 3 of us; the benches we were given were absolutely tiny, and far from robust.   And I discovered the wholemeal flour we had been given was really not up to much.


Well, we were on view to one and all, and I want to say thanks to all those who came past and took such an interest in what I was doing: especially Mr. Tony Jenkins from Soothills Bakers in Hampshire.   He was fascinated that a baker had turned up at a bakery competition prepared to make very simple products using long fermentation methods only, and no improvers.   I was glad to find I wasn't the only one.   Stephen Salt from Tameside College, near Manchester, was on a similar mission; the other baking competitor was Andrew Iyare from London.   There were 2 competitors on the following day, one being Emmanuel Hadijandreou from Judges Bakery, the other was Wayne Caddy who is a bakery consultant based in Rotherham.   I met up with Emmanuel after the competition, which was great; I've been wanting to meet him for a good while.   I know Wayne from my time at Leeds Thomas Danby, as he studied there as well, although some years before me.


The competition was pretty stressful at times.   The lack of equipment was difficult for all of us, and it was difficult to stay organised throughout.   We all managed to work well together, and the support from the co-ordinators on the day was much appreciated.   Andrew had finished in very good time.   Stephen baked his baguettes last of all, then he was finished too.   So I had the run of the ovens at the end, which was a bonus.   This was when I discovered that the Tom Chandley deck oven was low crown, so my tinned loaves were getting a bit stuck on the top heat bars!   I'd taken longer than the others quite deliberately; this had given me 4 hours to prove the baguettes in the chiller following a one hour bulk fermentation.


The Judging Panel had emerged, and I met up with Colin Lomax from Rank Hovis again.   I met him a few years ago at one of Rank's mills in Selby, North Yorkshire.   The current NA President was on the panel, with Peter Lonnican from Blackpool, and Sarah Auton, who had been helping to co-ordinate the whole thing.   All 4 were very supportive, and full of positive comments for our hard work.   I set my 18 baguettes on the sole of the oven with a trusty baguette peel specially made for me at the College, using some coarsely ground semolina from a local organic mill in Northumberland.   I had hoped for a little more proof, but they were so easy to handle, and baked up so crispy in the best deck oven I've worked on in years.   "Best bread of the day" was Colin Lomax's comment.   It was worth competing for that moment alone.   I didn't win the event.   That honour went to Wayne; my congratulations to him.   He gained the place in the UK team for bread baker.   The other places are for a Vienoisserie expert, and for someone to do a decorative dough piece.


I've attached a load of photos from the day, and all the recipes and methods used.   I've already given thanks for support above, but would like to add to this list.   My wife, Alison, took all these photos, bar one obvious one.   She accompanied me all the way to Birmingham and back, and supported and encouraged me all the way.   Also, Mary and Nigel in supplying me the special T65 flour, gave me a chance to put over at least one really top class product.   The white cobs were very fine too, and the sandwich loaves were just about up to scratch.   The wholemeal was poor, and I learnt a lot from this.   I would always take my own preferred choice of flours to a competition in future.   Trying to achieve 72% hydration, and mix in a planetary machine were big mistakes; the BFP flour was not the same spec as the Carrs Mill Race Wholemeal I use in College.   The bloomers "got away on me".   They tasted fantastic, but looked a little bit too ragged.


I'd made 52 loaves in a pretty stressful situation..but, I d had a thoroughly good time and felt totally at home in this rather strange environment.   I want to do this again; it was a lot of fun.   Next time I'll be a lot more organised in the run-in!


 


 


WHOLEMEAL TINNED BREAD


 



Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Recipe [grams]

1. Quarter Sponge

 

 

 

Wholemeal Flour

25

1750

875

Water

17

1190

595

Fresh Yeast

0.2

14

7

TOTAL

42.2

2954

1477

 

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

 

Quarter Sponge [from above]

42.2

2954

1477

Wholemeal Flour

75

5250

2625

Salt

1.8

126

63

Fresh Yeast

2.5

175

87.5

White Fat

1.8

126

63

Water

55[max]

3850

1925

TOTAL

178.3

12481

6240.5

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 2 minutes on first speed, and 6 - 8 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 40 minutes, ambient.   Knock back and rest 10 minutes.
  • Prepare tins, and scale and divide the dough into 950g pieces.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and pan the loaves
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH  for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 235°C, top heat 6 and bottom heat 8.   Use steam set at 2 and keep the damper closed for the first 25 minutes.   Check after 18 minutes, turn the loaf pans round if necessary, and drop the heat to 225°C.   Open the dampers after 25 minutes, drop the heat to 220°C and bake a further 5 - 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

WHITE COB AND BLOOMER

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Eighth Sponge

 

 

Strong White Flour

12.5

875

Water

7.5

525

Fresh Yeast

0.1

7

TOTAL

20.1

1407

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Eighth Sponge [from above]

20.1

1407

Strong White Flour

87.5

6125

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

2.4

168

White Fat

1.0

100

Water

55.5 [max for 63% hydration]

3675 [60%]

3885 [63%]

TOTAL

168.3

11811

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 3 minutes on first speed, and 3½ - 5 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 1¼ hours, ambient.   Knock back and rest a further 10 mins.
  • Prepare trays with silicone paper dusted with semolina for bloomers, and banneton with white flour for cobs, and scale and divide the dough into 950g pieces for large laves and 480g pieces for small.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape the loaves, tray up the bloomers, and turn the cobs upside down into the banneton.   Recipe yields 4 large and 3 small of each product.
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH  for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated.
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 225°C, top heat 7 and bottom heat 5.   Use steam set at 4 and keep the damper closed for the first 15 minutes.   Use a peel to set the loaves on the sole of the oven; bloomers on silicone, cut whole surface with angled cuts; cobs tipped onto the peel then transfer to oven after cutting, cross shape over whole floured surface.   Check after 20 minutes, to see if the small loaves are baked,   Open the dampers and bake a further 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

WHITE TIINNED BREAD: FARMOUSE and SANDWICH LOAVES

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Third Sponge

 

 

Strong White Flour

33.3

2331

Water

20

1400

Fresh Yeast

0.3

21

TOTAL

53.6

3752

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Third Sponge [from above]

53.6

3752

Strong White Flour

66.7

4669

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

1.7

119

White Fat

1.8

126

Water

43[max]

3010

TOTAL

168.6

11802

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt, fat and yeast and mix the final dough 3 minutes on first speed, and 3½ - 5 minutes on second speed.   DDT 24°C
  • Bulk Ferment, covered in an oil-lined container for 40 minutes, ambient.   Knock back and rest 10 minutes.
  • Prepare tins, and scale and divide the dough into 12 x 950g pieces.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and pan the loaves; makes 6 as sandwich loaves and 6 as farmhouse
  • Proof at 31°C, 85% rH for approx 1 hour; ensure oven set and pre-heated.   Be ready to bake the sandwich ahead of the farmhouse, as these loaves do not need full proof.   Lid the sandwich loaves first; dust the farmhouse loaf tops with white flour, and use a single slash, the full length of the loaf.
  • Bake to the following profile: Use a deck oven set at 235°C, top heat 6 and bottom heat 8.   Use steam set at 2 and keep the damper closed for the first 25 minutes.   Check after 18 minutes, turn the loaf pans round if necessary, and drop the heat to 225°C.   Open the dampers after 25 minutes, drop the heat to 220°C and bake a further 5 - 8 minutes.
  • De-pan and cool on wires.

 

TRADITIONAL BAGUETTES MADE WITH A POOLISH

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Poolish

 

 

Campteclair T65 Farine de Tradition

33.3

2331

Water

33.3

2331

Fresh Yeast

0.3

21

TOTAL

66.9

4683

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Poolish [from above]

66.9

4683

Campteclair T65 Farine de Tradition

66.7

4669

Salt

1.8

126

Fresh Yeast

0.9

63

Water

32.7

2289

TOTAL

169

11830

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the day before; DDT 21°C.   Mix 3 mins on speed one. Store ambient, covered in lightly oiled bowl.
  • Autolyse flour and water for half an hour.
  • Combine sponge, autolyse plus salt and yeast and mix the final dough for 9 minutes on first speed.   DDT 24°C.
  • Scale the dough into 2 equal portions.   Bulk ferment both portions in oil-lined, covered bowls for 40 minutes.
  • Scale the first portion into 18 x 325g pieces and mould round.   Rest covered for 10 minutes.   Meanwhile, scale the other dough portion into 18 x 325g pieces, and mould round.   Store these covered in the chiller for 2 hours.
  • Once rested, roll out the 18 pieces from the first batch of dough, using a baguette moulder, to 60cm.   Place these onto stick wires and set to prove; 35°C, 85% rH, for 45 mins to 1 hour approx.   Use 6 diagonal cuts just prior to baking.
  • Bake as follows: deck oven, full steam; 240°C, top 6.5, bottom 5, for 20 minutes.   Turn the heat down to 225°C, for 5 minutes.   Open the damper and turn the heat to 215°C and bake a further 5 - 7 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • For the second batch, gradually and carefully, roll each piece out by hand to 60cm.   Set to prove, ambient, en coûche and well covered with cloth and plastic.   Use semolina, as dust, as required.   Try to keep the seal of each baguette on the bottom.   Prove approx 1 hour.   Cut each loaf using a grignette, 6 diagonal slashes.   Set on the sole of the oven using a baguette peel.

Bake profile: as for the first portion of baguettes.   Cool on wires

 

JoeVa's picture
JoeVa

Mulino Marino is (small) miller near Cuneo (Piemonte) that work hard to produce a high quality stone grounded organic flour. HERE the link to the web site where you can read more about the history, the products etc.

          

One of the most interesting thing is they use organic grains grown in Piemonte and Lombardia, just where I live. And the varieties of grains they mix are the best one for bread baking. For example Taylor and Bologna are hard/medium-hard wheat varieties that can be used in place of imported Canadian wheat. These and other national grain are mixed with care to produce a very good range of flours. All the flour is milled in pureness and contains no additional additives (milk and its derivatives, vitamins, preservatives, malt and its derivatives, etc).

The miller works also with ancient grains like Farro Monoccocum, Kamut, 8-row Maize, Buckwheat and Enkir.

                           

                           

The first time I heard about Mulino Marino was from a friend and just one week ago from a baker. So, wednesday I was in Milano center and I stopped at EatItaly store where I bought some flour.

There were a lot of flours but my choice was clear, I thought at the bread I want to bake and I picked up Buratto and Manitoba flours.

  • Buratto is a medium strength wheat flour, stone milled, 80% extraction rate (Italian Type 1).
  • Manitoba is a strong bread flour, cylinder milled, 72% extraction rate (Italian Type 0).
Here the sourdough bread mix I used for "Pane Buratto":
  • 75% buratto + 25% manitoba (+ 0.5% malted barley flour)
  • 25% pre-fermented flour (20% buratto and 80% manitoba)
  • overall hydration 61%-62%, medium-soft dough
           [The loaf]                     [The crumb] Sorry, for the bad shaping and the tunnel, remove it with your imagination and look the crumb                                 texture around or fly into the tunnel and observe the translucent wall.           

The crumb is perfect: light but substantial, yieldind, moisty, soft and elastic. I made two loaves, one with stiff levain (50% hydration) and one with liquid levain (100% hydration). The stiff levain adds a touch (a very little note) of acetic acidity, I prefer the loaf with liquid levain.

The crust very good (for my oven and steaming apparatus). A good balance between chewy and fragrant.

The loaf shown a good oven spring and volume.

I can say Buratto flour is a perfect organic "all purpose" flour (tastier and rich of soluble fiber), not comparable with supermarket Italian flour. It's a pleasure to work with: after the autolyse I added the salt and in less than 2 minute of gentle hand mixing to incorporate the salt the dough shown a good gluten development.

The lesson for me is: use flour with extraction rate >= 80%, that is >= Italian Type 1. For sure I will test more flours from Mulino Marino ... Setaccio (a step over Buratto with a higher extraction rate, >= 85%) and SaporiAntichi (ancient grains mix) are my preferred.

coreyjan's picture
coreyjan

I like Passover and I like Matzah - especially the Yehudah brand whole wheat matzot that they sell at Whole Foods. I like matzah with butter. I like matzah with honey. I like it with brie or stilton on it. I like it in our kosher-for-Passover versions of Lasagna, Spanakopita and Nachos (which we call "Matzagna," "Matzakopita" and "Machos"). And for quite some time now, I've wanted to make my own matzah for Passover. I bake our own bread, make our tortillas - how much harder could this be?


Not much, it turns out.


 


Corey-Jan's Matzot


 


The trick is to know what you're doing. I researched a lot before I got started. There's the obvious: no yeast or other leavening agents. But what else?


Well, the good news is that if you use whole wheat flour (particularly if you can get it somewhere where you can grind it yourself to watch it and be sure that no moisture is being added), you don't have to buy special Passover flour. Well, we switched from white flour to only whole grains a long time ago. So that part was taken care of.


I wondered if I could add olive oil to my dough, the way I do when I make tortillas. After all, that wouldn't add any kind of leavening. I was all set and ready to go with that - until I learned why Kosher for Passover matzah doesn't have oil in it. Turns out that the prohibition has nothing to do with leavening. It has to do with that concept of matzah being the "poor bread that our ancestors took out of the land of Egypt." If I were to add oil, it would make the matzot "too rich." Oil would have been a luxury that the Egyptian slaves probably didn't have in abundance. It's the same reason why egg matzot aren't strictly Kosher for Passover. So, okay, no olive oil.


Back to the plus side of things, I discovered no reason not to mix the dough in a food processor, as long as it was clean and dry to start with.


Then, there was that question of the 18 minutes. I saw lots of recipes online that made it unclear whether that would be the start-to-finish time or the start-to-oven time. Just to be clear, in order for it to be kosher for Passover matzah, it's 18 minutes, start-to-finish. So, okay - this was going to be a race.


My friend Kimberly came over to do this with me and one thing became immediately clear: this would be very hard to do as an individual effort - but it's relatively simple with a partner. We figured that it would be even easier if between three and six people worked together. And we agreed that the whole matzah-making experience was probably a female bonding/community-building thing when people didn't buy mass-produced matzot. Whether that was an intentional or accidental by-product, we weren't sure.


So, we preheated the oven to 500 degrees, mixed four cups of whole wheat flour and a little salt, started the timer and turned on the food processor. In went the water - about one and a third cups, maybe a touch more - just until the dough collected together into a ball. Kimberly divided the dough into neat little balls. I rolled them out (very, very thin) and put them on baking sheets (aluminum foil, actually). She poked at them with a fork (I don't have one of those cool rolling pins with spikes that they use to make pizza as well as matzah) and popped them into the oven to bake for about 3 minutes each. When the timer beeped, we had eight kosher for Passover matzot plus four that needed a little more time in the oven. We figured we could use those for taste testing and such. Then we looked at each other. That wasn't so hard. So, we cleaned everything off, scraped the dough scraps off the rolling pin and started again. This time, we did even better, making around 14 kosher for Passover matzot.


They didn't come out as perfectly flat as the ones from the store but they were nicely crispy - and became crispier as they cooled. But we were both pleased with the effort. And the taste - like any other bread, there is something about how it tastes when it's been freshly baked, as opposed to when it's been sitting on a box for a while that's just plain better. Yum. Really - yum.


My family goes through about four or five boxes of matzah every Passover. I don't know that I have it in me to make THAT many batches. But would I want to augment the store-bought stuff with a batch of home-made? Oh yeah. And that whole community building aspect of it appeals to me, too. After all, everyone knows my ethos about just about everything - as long as I can make it a social occasion, I'm good to go. It'll be a great part of the holiday preparations and we'll all get to take home some artisanal-looking matzot, too.


Anyone else want in on it for next year?


 

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