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varda

When Floyd posted his Hokkaido Milk Bread I just had to try it.    Finally I got to it, and tasted it and then thought, I've made this before, even though I knew I'd never made a bread called Hokkaido bread.    I went back to the databanks and found that a year and a half ago, I made   Syd's Asian Style Pain de Mie, which is what I had been thinking of.  I must have had some sort of trauma interference with my memory as at the time my Kitchen Aid was not up to the task of intensive kneading, so I did it by hand which was a bigger workout than I had bargained for.   Fortunately, now I have upgraded to a tiny little Bosch which is much more suited to the task.   That freed me up to bake both of these breads. 

So being somewhat anal...ytical, I decided to bake them side by side and see how similar they really are.   First the formulas:

 

Syd's scaled to

472 g

    

Floyd's scaled to

472

  

factor

0.2

       

0.3

  
 

Final

Biga

Tang Zhang

Total

B %

  

Final

Tang Zhang

Total

`

AP Flour

67

157

16

240

  

AP Flour

222

15

236

 

Sugar

27

4

0.7

32

13%

 

Sugar

31

 

31

13%

Milk

22

97

16

135

56%

 

Milk

79

73

153

65%

Eggs

31

  

31

13%

 

Eggs

28

 

28

12%

Butter

22

 

7

29

12%

 

Butter

15

 

15

6%

Yeast

1

0.4

 

2

0.7%

 

Yeast

4

 

4

1.6%

Salt

3

 

0.2

3

1.2%

 

Salt

5

 

5

2.0%

    

472

     

472

 

Quite similar.  What the Pain de Mie lacks in hydration it makes up for in butter, and so forth. 

These formulas reflect two changes I made in the Hokkaido bread - for all the milk products listed in Floyd's formula, I used milk, as well as all the liquid in the Tangzhong.   Also I upped the salt to 2% which I meant to undo today, but which I forgot to undo.  

While the ingredients are the same, and percents at least similar, the methods are quite different.   Syd's is made over a four day period - first the tangzhong, then a biga like thing, then final dough.   Floyd's on the other hand is made all in one shot.   Also the tangzhong ingredients and procedures are different.   I followed each of the methods as written.  

The doughs handled fairly differently.   The Pain de Mie after around 10 minutes of pounding at high speed, came together in a tight ball.   The Hokkaido bread took a longer beating and while it window paned beautifully, it still remained somewhat slack and sticky.   At shaping, they also handled somewhat differently, with the Hokkaido being more airy and light, and the Pain de Mie more easy to manage. 

Now the crumb (or should I say the mie.)

First Hokkaido:

Now the Pain de Mie:

Similar yes?

And now the question - are they shreddably soft?

Yes - I think so.

First Hokkaido:

Now Pain de Mie:

And finally - the taste:

They are very similar.   However there are subtle differences:   The best distinction I can come up with is  the Pain de Mie is smooth and creamy, while the Hokkaido is a bit sharper.  Both are really delicious.  

So going forward, which version would I make?   If I remember my four day window, I'd go with the Pain de Mie simply to get that extra smooth and cream texture.    If I forgot the window, I'd make the Hokkaido.  

And that's that.

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varda

The other day I was baking a lot of bread, and had excess white starter on my hands.   I knew that I had (or would have) too much bread on hand to make more, but what about later in the week?   Maybe I would run out and wouldn't have time to bake.    So I took my excess starter, added flour, water and salt, mixed it up, put it in a lidded tub and stuck it in the refrigerator.   Two days later, sure enough the bread had run out.   So I removed the tub from the refrigerator.   The dough was totally aerated, but did not have a sour odor.   I took that as a good sign.   I scraped out the dough, cut it and shaped it.    Talk about enzymatic autolyse - oh forget the autolyse part.   The dough was extremely sticky and would not unstick.   I figured less handling would be better than more, so I just got it shaped without trying for much form, and floured it very well, so it wouldn't stick to the couche,  Then let it proof while I preheated the oven and stone.  Then in it went.    The resulting bread was certainly not the best I've ever made, but really not bad.    And no surprise here, very tartly sour.   I don't generally strive for sour bread, but this was a nice change of pace. 

Here's the insides:

From these pictures you can spot two issues:   separation in the crumb.   I'm not sure what that's from.   And a somewhat pale crust undoubtedly due to the long refrigeration.   However, despite the paleness, the crust was quite crisp and good. 

Since I just threw this together, computing in my head at the counter, I'm not 100% sure what this is.   Here is my best guess:   100% KAAP, 67% hydration, 20% prefermented flour, 2.5% salt.   I was going for 2% salt, but as I recall, accidentally put in more, and then thought, that was just fine given that I didn't know when this was coming out of the refrigerator.  

For a bread that took less than 15 minutes of work altogether, I will declare this a success.

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varda

I have never been one to put extra stuff into bread.   Flour and water all the way.   And yet, resolve weakens, fruit beckons, fresh loafers keep on posting.    What can one do?    A rhetorical question of course.    The simple answer is throw in a few dried cranberries.   I had already developed a nice seeded levain (after tasting Jong Yang's delcious one at the TFL Boston meet-up)  and thought - just swap out the seeds for the cranberries.   It works.   Two completely different breads on the same substrate.  

One might note that this is a tad underdeveloped.   It is because at the same time I was making this loaf I was also making several others:

I neither had time to properly knead by hand, nor was the mixer free.   So I just mixed it up by hand and did a few stretch and folds, and it almost got there.  Here it is on the front left with two seeded levains, one tzitzel rye, and three challahs.   The sourdough challah is courtesy of Maggie Glezer, via zolablue's excellent 6 year old post.   I never realized how easy it was to do a six strand braid until watching the Maggie Glezer video referenced in zolablue's write-up.   

The ones on the right are six strand.   On the left is 4 strand using exactly the same braiding technique.  

But the real news here is how delicious this challah is.  I made a few different versions of challah over the week, trying to decided which one to go with.   This beat them hands down.   It doesn't taste even slightly sour, but the starter takes a caky, eggy treat and turns it into a really fine bread.  

Update:   Tried the cranberry sourdough again but this time with mixing.  It makes a difference. 

Formula and method for the cranberry sourdough

 

Multigrain Cranberry Sourdough   
      
Starter67% Hydration, 100% KAAP  
Rye Sour82% Hydration 100% Rye  
      
        Final   Rye Sour    Starter       Total    Percent
KABF177  17748%
Rye071 7119%
KAAP0 14144%
WW71  7119%
Spelt35  3510%
Water212591028076%
Salt8  82%
Cranberry40  4011%
Rye Sour130    
Starter24    
      
Total Dough698    
Total Flour369    
% preferment23%    
      
      
Autolyse flour and water 1 hour   
Mix all ingredients until developed   
Bulk Ferment 1.5 hours    
Roll into batard shape and lightly rock (dough is very sticky)
Proof in couche 80 minutes (or so) until soft  
Bake with steam for first 5 minutes then at 450 for 35 more.
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varda

 

Way back when, Sylvia posted a pugliese with a lighter than air crumb.   I baked it once and loved it, then forgot about it.  Browsing through old bread pictures the other day I came upon a photograph of my old pugliese, and decided to try it again.    However, I couldn't leave well enough alone and follow the recipe.    Instead,  I tweaked it just a little.   

The original formula calls for poolish, and yet, there was ripe starter sitting on the counter with no label other than discard.   Should I discard it or did it have a place in this little pugliese?    The problem with using starter for a bread like this is that it takes up too much of the flavor room and masks the delicate taste of the durum.   A baking error one might say.   Not wanting to fall into this trap, I decided to use some of the starter, but handle it very carefully to keep the flavor nice and balanced.     

I fed the starter with some fresh flour and let it ferment for just long enough for it to start expanding, but not long enough to build up a heady aroma.    At that point, I mixed everything up, and proceeded as directed.   

This dough was very wet and somewhat difficult to handle.   I developed the dough by mixing at speed 1, 2, 3, 4 (!) in my Bosch Compact for a total of 6 minutes.    By the end, it had cleared the bowl but was very wet and sticky, and spread out again as soon as I let it rest.   I did stretch and fold in the bowl twice at half hour intervals, and for the third S&F after 30 more minutes, got my hands very wet and picked the dough up and suspended it and rotated it.  

I "shaped" the dough into a boule, which is similar to saying that one shaped a water balloon - more like a little prod here and a poke there, dusted it with durum flour and proofed upside down in a ceramic bowl.    It swelled up over the sides of the bowl (doubling in size) in an hour at which point it went into the oven unscored, as there was just no point in poking at it. 

It came out nicely - self scoring along the way - and had the subtle flavor I had hoped for, with a light, tender crumb and a  crisp crust.   All in all, a  pleasant flavor variation from the original but still a pugliese at heart.

 

Formula and method:

 Note:  fixed formula error - reversed amounts of KAAP and Durum in final.

Poolish / Starter

 

Feeding

Total

 

Seed

65

   

KAAP

39

45

84

 

Water

26

40

66

79%

   

150

 
     
 

Final

Poolish

Total

Percent

KAAP

73

82

162

65%

KA Durum

85

 

85

35%

Water

134

64

198

83%

Salt

4

 

4

1.9%

Yeast

2

 

2

0.9%

Poolish

146

   
     

factor

0.97

   

Total Flour

240

   

Dough Weight

445

   

Final weight

354

   

Shrinkage

80%

   

Prefermented flour

16%

   

 

Mix poolish. Ripen for 3.5 hours

Mix ingredients 6 minutes, increase to speed 4

Dough cleans bowl but still wet and sticky

S&F in bowl every 1/2 hour 3 times - final in the air

BF total of 2 hours 45 minutes - dough will have expanded

Shape into boule on counter dusted with durum flour

It is very squishy like a balloon

Proof in dusted bowl for1 hour - dough doubles

Bake with steam for 5 minutes (oven preheated to 500 then turned off)

then at 450 for 35 minutes

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varda

Update:   A photographer and reporter from the local paper stopped by our meet-up.   Here is the link to the article.   In the print version we were the top front page story.  

On Saturday, we had our Boston Area TFL meet up.   Ten intrepid bakers plus family members broke bread together.   Lots of bread.   Lots of really amazing, delicious, and varied bread.    We all had a great time chatting, and each had a chance to describe their bread, show and tell, and so on.   Ian and I took a lot of pictures, so I'll let the pictures do the talking.   (Ian's are the wider ones.   I shrunk mine down.)

The scene

Kristen's Volkornbrot and Hotcross Buns,  Colin's scrumpy buns

Ian's guacamole loaf

Jong Yang's multi-seed sourdough

Mike's many breads

Barb's dinner rolls, Bill's bagels and baguettes

Varda's breads

Ian's corn feta

Barb's Jalapeno rolls

Kirsten's Volkornbrot

Kristijan's Levain

And not just bread:

Jong Yang's egg custard tarts

Mike's pastrami

Lisa's chocolate chip and raspberry bread

Kristijan's salt cod salad next to his Levain

And people too:

Bill, Ian, Kirsten

Vinni, Mike, Bob

Kristijan and Olga

Barb

Lisa

Me and bread

Jong Yang speaking

Kirsten

Colin, Bill, Kirsten

And stuff:

Jong Yang's homemade brotform next to Bob's Olive Rosemary Levain, Kristijan's Levain behind

Another Jong Yang wooden brotform

Jong Yang's homemade on top of stone steamers

Some of us brought starters to trade and smell

What else?   Probably more updates later and hopefully other attendees will chime in.

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varda

 

Deli Rye is a favorite of mine, but it's hard to come by well made and authentic versions of it.    Fortunately it was one of the four breads we made at the King Arthur Rye class.   Today, I made this bread with one change - charnushka instead of caraway.   A simple change but wow, what a difference in flavor.   Frankly I was testing the theory that my husband's claim not to like rye was really a dislike of caraway.   He loved this bread, so I guess I'm right.    This is a very mild 20% rye bread with no sour flavor whatsoever.    It has a very nice texture, and the charnushka is just a lovely complement to the rye.  

I continue to use the new steaming method recommended by PeterS and I think it makes a big improvement to the crust.

Altogether this is a bread I will want to make again and again.    And so ends my series on the King Arthur Rye Class.   Someone else will have to post on the quark bread.  

Formula and method:

3/16/2013          
           
Rye sour   8:30 PM      Total
Seed 50        
Whole Rye 27 80     107
Water 23 65     88
          195
           
3/17/2013          
  Final Sour Total Percent  
Whole Rye 0 97 97 20%  
KAAP 384   384 80%  
Water 256 79 335 70%  
Salt 10   10 2.0%  
Yeast 2   2 0.4%  
Charnushka 6   6 1.2%  
Sour 176        
           
Rye Sour seed hydration 83%    
Rye Sour hydration   82%    
Starter factor   0.90    
Total Flour   481    
Total Whole Grain   20%    
Total Dough   828    
Percent prefermented flour 20%    
Hydration     70%    

Allow starter to ripen 16 hours after last build.   Mix all ingredients - consistency is somewhere in between a dough and a paste.   Bulk Ferment 1 hour.    Shape into stubby batard.   Coat with seeds.   Proof 50 minutes.   Slash crossways 5 times.   Bake 45 minutes at 450 with steam for 1st 5 minutes.  

Now from the sublime to the ridiculous.    I have been experimenting with baking with the discard from my daily starter mixes.   I tried crackers - needs work.   Bread - total disaster.  Then I moved on to hot pockets.    First a cheese pocket.   Then a few changes and salami and cheese.   These were promising.    Today, I put together a spiced meat pie.   It came out really nicely.   For some reason the discard starter just works really well on this.    The bread is very sour, but the meat stands up to it so it all seems just right. 

 

Bread:

Discard Starter (Rye and Wheat starters)    400g   (Rye is 83% hydration, wheat is 67% - together around 75%)

KAAP  300g

Water  200g

Salt   14g

(When I feed my starters twice per day, I put the discard into a lidded container in the refrigerator.   This starter is the product of the last week or so.)

Mix all ingredients until blended and fairly developed (just a few minutes)

Bulk Ferment on counter 3 hours.   

Brown 1 lb ground beef in pan and remove some of the fat.    Do not cook thoroughly.   Mix in chopped onions, italian plum tomatoes (canned around  6 of them without much of the juice) and spice with cumin, cardamon, coriander, ginger, black pepper, cayenne, cilantro, salt.)   Press out dough onto parchment paper on counter until fairly thin (1/4 inch.)  Proof covered around 45 minutes.    Place filling on one side of the dough, fold over and press the edges tight.   Refrigerate until 1 hour before dinner.   Pierce with knife all over.  Bake at 400F with steam for first 5 minutes for around 55 minutes.   Serve.  

Not bad.   Should have used more spices, and sauteed the onion with the meat.    Even though I tried to keep the liquid down, it still got pretty wet and some of it leaked out.   

 

 

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varda

No not a publishing company, or a fancy new German housewares line - just a humble cobbler's loaf and miller's miche.  

Continuing on with trying to absorb the King Arthur rye class I took a few weeks ago, I decided to  make a Schuster Laib, or cobbler's loaf.   Mr. Hamelman explained that this upside down rye loaf was probably originally some apprentice baker's error and so the head baker called it a cobbler's loaf, because for some reason, calling someone a cobbler was a big insult.   Now of course, cobbler's loaves are made on purpose, and I've always gasped in admiration whenever I saw one.   (Breadsong's version comes to mind.)       At our class, while we were making the 80% rye loaves with rye soaker in Pullman pans, Mr. Hamelman quietly put one of these together.    So this time, I made an 80% rye loaf as a free standing upside down hearth loaf.  

At the class we had to sign (at least in our minds) an affidavit promising not to cut into the 80% loaves for 24 hours.    So I can't get a look inside just yet, as it's only been around 4.   

Update:   So I had a few people over this morning and served the bread (they were expecting maybe coffee cake?)   and they liked it, so I hacked it up to give them some to take home, almost forgetting that I owed a crumb shot.   Fortunately there was a little bit left.  

The flavor was very intense - that rye sour smell that I've been talking about transformed to taste.    As much flavor as you'll ever get from flour and water.     

So as not to have a day go by without bread, I decided to make a second loaf today.   My home-milled flour has been getting cranky, as I make one rye loaf after another, so I decided to pull it out of the closet and take it for a spin.    Loaf two is a miller's miche, so called because I used my home milled and sifted flour for the final dough, and sprinkled the whole loaf with the sifted and remilled bran. 

The dough was so sticky when I flipped it out of the basket using my hand to steady it onto the peel, that it stuck to my hand, and I had to scrape it off and pat the loaf back together, so I was expecting a disaster.   It recovered quite nicely in the oven, though, and is happily edible by humans. 

The rye loaf was made with my new twice daily fed rye sour, and the miller's loaf was made with twice daily fed white starter.    For today's bake, I finally got the smell that I remembered from the rye sour at King Arthur, although much less overpowering, as much smaller quantity.    My wheat starter seems happier and more active as well, so I'm happy with the new regimen.  

I used the exact formula from the class for the 80% rye, but modified process a bit to suit my baking conditions.    I will list what I did rather than Mr. Hamelmans precise instructions.

Formulas and methods:

Schuster's Laib

3/10/2013

 

1st feed

2nd feed

2nd feed

Total

Rye sour

 

12:30 PM

9:30 PM

9:30 PM

 

Seed

54

       

Whole Rye

28

100

-55

150

223

Water

26

82

-45

122

185

         

408

Soaker

         

Coarse Rye

109

       

boiling water

164

       
 

273

       
           

3/11/2013

Final

Sour

Soaker

Total

Percent

Whole Rye

137

192

109

438

80%

Sir Lancelot high gluten

109

   

109

20%

Water

153

158

164

475

87%

Salt

10

   

10

1.8%

Yeast

5

   

5

1.0%

Sour

350

       

Soaker

273

       
           

Rye Sour seed hydration

   

90%

   

Rye Sour hydration

   

83%

   

Starter factor

   

0.86

   

Total Flour

   

547

   

Total Whole Grain

   

80%

   

Total Dough

   

1037

   

Percent prefermented flour

 

35%

   

Hydration

   

87%

   
           

Build rye sour as listed.   Sprinkle top with rye flour after 2nd build

 

Make soaker at the same time as final sour build

   

After 12 hours when sour is ripe (smell, and islands of the sprinkled rye flour)

mix all ingredients.   Consistency is paste.

     

Bulk Ferment 30 minutes.    Shape sprinkling top with rye after folding in

each corner.    Place seam side down in lined basket.

   

Proof 1 hour 45 minutes.

         

Preheat oven to 550 for one hour (plus) with stone and large cast iron pan

Turn oven off, load loaf, and pour water into cast iron pan.   Close oven and

listen.   If hissing stops before 5 minutes is up, add water.   After five minutes,

turn oven to 470F for 15 minutes.   Then reduce heat to 440 for 40 minutes.

Remove and cool.

         

When cool wrap for overnight.  

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miller’s Miche

3/10/2013

 

1st feed

Total

   
   

9:30 PM

     

Seed

43

       

KAAP

25

118

143

   

Whole Rye

1

7

8

   

Water

17

84

101

67%

 
     

252

   

3/11/2013

         
 

Final

Starter

Sour

Total

Percent

KAAP

 

130

 

130

21%

Whole Rye

 

8

22

29

5%

Golden

450

   

450

74%

Water

350

92

18

461

76%

Salt

11

   

11

1.8%

Starter

230

       

Rye Sour

40

       
           
           

Starter seed hydration

 

67%

   

Starter hydration

 

67%

   

Starter factor

   

0.9

   

Total Flour

   

609

   

Total Whole Grain

 

79%

   

Total Dough

   

1081

   

Percent prefermented flour

26%

   

Hydration

   

76%

   
           
           

Autolyse flour and water 30 minutes

     

Add remaining ingredients and mix at speeds 1 and 2

 

to medium development

       

Rest 5 minutes.   Stretch and fold in bowl.

   

Bulk Ferment 2 hours.  

       

Shape into boule and place in lined basket.

   

Proof for 1.5 hours.  

       

Bake at 450 with steam (cast iron method - see above) for 5 minutes

without for 40. 

       

Remove and cool.

       
           

Note that Rye Sour is leftover from the Rye loaf.   

 

 

 

 

 

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varda

Ever since returning from the King Arthur Rye class, I've been itching to make the four breads that we baked there, but first I wanted to get my rye starter into better shape.   I put both my rye and wheat starters on a twice a day feeding regimen, and gave them time to become happy and well fed.   Yesterday I decided it was time, and decided to start with the Flax Seed bread.   I followed along with Mr. Hamelman's formula and instructions, and didn't allow myself so much as a tweak.    Since I have been keeping a tiny amount of starter (around 50g) to make the twice daily feeding easier, and also to avoid unnecessary wastage, I built it up to quantity yesterday in three stages.   While I never got the in your face pungent smell of the KA rye sour, I did remember JH had asked us to taste a bit before baking.    So I tasted a bit this morning, and it was pretty tart stuff.  

I made two other changes to my routine.   First, I recently purchased a cordierite stone to replace the block of granite I've been using for the last few years.   That was mostly because the granite was both two small and too heavy, but I think the cordierite is better as well.    Second I changed my steaming routine.    I have been using towels for the last few years and thought I was getting good results, but when I saw the crust colors at KA, I thought I would see if I could do better.    So I ended up doing a combination of the two cast iron pan methods PeterS and Yerffej discuss in this post and this post respectively, not neccesarily intentionally and I'm glad no one was watching as I was flinging hot water around and trying not to get burned.    More refinement to come, but I was pretty happy with the crust.

Now on to tasting.   This bread has a really nice tang to it, nicely complemented by the flax seed flavor.    Despite my inclination against it, given my no tweaks rule, I used a bit of old bread in the soaker.     I have no idea what impact that has but it didn't ruin it.  

So I'll call myself moderately pleased, and on to formulas 2, 3, and 4. 

3/3/2013

 

1st feed

2nd feed

Total

Percent

Rye sour

 

4:30 PM

10:00 PM

  

Seed

49

    

Whole Rye

27

50

140

217

 

Water

22

42

115

179

83%

    

396

 

Soaker

10:00 PM

    

Flax Seed

50

    

Old Bread

40

    

Water

150

    
      

3/4/2013

Final

Sour

Soaker

Total

Percent

KAAP

300

  

300

60%

Whole Rye

 

199

 

199

40%

Water

86

164

150

400

80%

Salt

10

  

10

2.0%

Instant Yeast

3

  

3

0.6%

Flax Seed

  

50

50

 

Old Bread

  

40

40

 

Rye Sour

363

  

1002

 

Starter factor

91.7%

    

 

Night before mix make final starter build, and soaker.   When starter is ripe, mix all ingredients.   DDT 76F.  Proof 1 hour.   Preshape, rest and shape.   Place in banneton.   Proof around 1 hour.   Bake at 440F with steam at beginning.   JH’s notes say 38-40 minutes.   I think we did longer than that in class, and today I baked for around 45 minutes.  

 

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varda

This weekend,  I and three other TFLers took a rye class at King Arthur with Jeffrey Hamelman.    Larry - aka Wally -  Faith in Virginia, and Otis - aka burntmyfingers - were there each driving from a different corner of the region.   It was fantastic to meet them for once, knowing them only from their bread and words up to now.  The class had 11 students (one didn't show up!)   ranging in age and experience, with the one from furthest away hailing from Malibu, CA.  

If I had any hopes in advance for the class, it would have been to gain a bit more skill in particular areas like mixing, shaping, slashing.   I can safely say that I did not make even an inch of progress in any of these areas.    That does not mean however, that I didn't learn anything.   Here are the lessons I learned in the order that I think of them. 

The most tangible lesson to come out of this class for me  is that my rye starter needs work.   The smell of the Hamelmanian rye starter is like nothing I've ever smelled before.   Since of course we were dealing with large enough quantities of starter to make 25 large loaves of bread for each of the 4 formulas we made over the weekend the mass was much larger than anything I'd ever worked with.    The smell was completely overpowering, and I had to move back a pace or two just to keep from keeling over.   My rye starter, even with my nose right up to it, just cannot compare.    This carried through all the way to the taste of the breads.

Chef Hamelman gave us a disquisition on the benefits of taking good care of our starters, explaining that extended refrigeration without feeding  (mea culpa) leads to an acid buildup that in turn begins killing off the yeast and beneficial bacteria.    While the King Arthur bakery feeds their wheat and rye starters twice a day, every day, he understood that might be tough for those of us who only bake once or twice a week, but he nevertheless suggested that we up our feeding schedule to at least a few meals per week.   While I have been skeptical of this in the past, I am not anymore.   In fact, if I could get the flavor in my breads that came out of the King Arthur classroom ovens yesterday, I would gladly feed twice a day no matter how much I had to throw out.    Consider me converted at least in theory.   We'll see what happens in practice.  

Home bakers are at a disadvantage when it comes to equipment.    Our loaves came out of the ovens with a sheen that I have never been able to achieve with my gas oven and various steaming techniques.    One press of a button and the deck ovens filled magically with steam which was then vented at just the right moment.     The spiral mixer just mixed the heck out of all the doughs while we all stood around with not much to do.   What can we do about this?   Be jealous.   That's it.

Chef Hamelman spent a lot of time testing us on when things were done.   Is the dough mixed enough?   Proofed enough?   Baked enough?   He kept a poker face throughout, there were always divergent opinions, and most of us were wrong as often as right.     What I did learn is that you can't just knock the bottom of a loaf to see if baking is done.   He recommended squeezing, looking, etc.   He did not pull out a probe thermometer and check.    Glad of that as I fried mine awhile ago and haven't replaced it.  

Peels with 8 or 9 loaves of bread on them are really heavy and getting them into the hot  oven was too scary for me.   I finally took a stab at removing a load, and that was bad enough.   Chef Hamelman's assistant was a quite thin and small young woman who was originally a baker in the KA bakery, so some are made of sterner stuff than I.    Other than that, the professional baking environment seemed much more manageable to me than I had imagined (see lesson about equipment above.)

Steam matters.   I already knew this, but we had a great accidental demonstration.   In addition to the 100 or so loaves that got made over the course of the two days, we also made a batch of salt sticks,  and a batch of deli rye rolls.   These were baked in the same oven as some 80% rye panned loaves - not a deck oven.    They came out looking very inedible, as it turned out the steam wasn't hooked up to that oven much to Chef Hamelman's surprise.   The loaves made of the same dough that were baked in the deck ovens were burnished and plump as could be.    The 80% rye did fine however, as it was very wet, and had the protection of the pans.  

Loaves made were a deli rye (best I've ever tasted) the 80% rye pan loaves, a flax seed rye, and a quark rye.    We each came home with two of everything but the pan loaves and I immediately wrapped most of it up and froze.   My husband who has always expressed an aversion to rye, has been chowing down on the flax seed loaf, and says it is the best loaf I've ever made.    Well I didn't really make it in any sense other than shaping it.    As my son put it,  I paid a lot of money to find out just how much I have yet to learn (and he didn't say it quite as nicely as that.)  

Final lesson:   if you are going to depend on your phone for picture taking, you have to remember to take the charger.   

Hope other participants will post themselves or add to this.

I sign off tired but happy.

-Varda

Update:   Rod, a student in the class, kindly sent in his excellent pictures and descriptions for posting:

Jeffrey put whole rye flour on the top surface of the sourdough as much to pay homage to his German mentor and less for environmental control.  In pursuit of tradition.  This sourdough was developed after 16 hour at room temperature with a plastic wrap cover over the container.

From the French word  gémir, to groan.  The backbreaking work of the third year apprentice.

So few caraway seeds in the deli rye dough but the flavor was pronounced.

Never far from the mixer.

Applying flour to the outer edge for an artistic flare.   It was recommended to perform this task while the dough was still moist and consider using niger seed for a more dramatic effect.

Here is a shot of the quark loaves.   Remember how hot they were when we were attempting to determine if they were done.   It was easier to compare the color in the loaves in the oven.

Fruits of our labor.

varda's picture
varda

Last week, I had to go out during a bake, and didn't expect to get back in time for shaping.   Usually I would have placed the dough in the refrigerator to suspend operations during my absence, but in the spirit of experimentation, I decided to leave it on the counter in a 70degF kitchen.    When I got back the dough was very soft and bubbly, and I was afraid overfermented, so I shaped (not that easy given how full of gas it was) and proofed but cut the proof short (45 minutes) as I was worried about losing the whole bake.    Long story a little shorter, I underproofed it significantly and got an exploding loaf.    But an exploding loaf with a boatload of flavor.    Today I decided to retrace these steps, but with a normal proof.   I observed two differences between today's loaf and last week's.    One is today's loaf expanded normally in the oven, and two, the crumb isn't nearly as open.   Same rich flavor though.  

And now, the real reason I wanted to post:

I love this bowl.   It was a poor unwanted reject at the Kohl's housewares sale.   It has a crack in the bottom.    I never grabbed anything off the shelf so fast.    Perfect.   Just perfect.

But back to bread.

Formula and method:

   

1st feed

2nd feed

Mix

 

2/15/2013

 

4:15 PM

10:00 PM

9:30 AM

 

Seed

41

       

KAAP

23

75

96

194

95%

Whole Rye

1

5

4

10

5%

Water

17

55

68

140

68%

       

344

8.4

2/16/2013

Final

Starter

Total

Percent

 

KAAP

200

141

341

57%

 

Whole Rye

 

8

8

1%

 

Golden*

250

 

250

42%

 

Water

300

101

401

67%

 

Salt

12

 

12

2.0%

 

Starter

250

       
 

0.73

 

1012

   
           

Autolyse flour and water for 45 minutes

   

Add salt and starter and mix until smooth and supple

(Speed 1 around 10 minutes)

     

BF 45 minutes

       

S&F

         

BF 3 hours

         

Shape into boule and place in bowl

   

Proof until soft but still a bit springy

   

Bake at 450F with steam for 20 minutes

   

without for 22

       

 * See this post for description

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