The Fresh Loaf

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Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

The 40-year old Swedish chef-owner, Mathias Dahlgren, has two Michelin-starred restaurants, Bon Lloc and Matsalen, the latter in Stockholm.  His style of cuisine is Swedish traditional as well as innovational (a fusion of Scandinavian, Tuscan, Californian and Oriental dishes). 


I saw a picture of his Swedish Rye Bread in Coco: 10 World-Leading Masters Choose 100 Contemporary Chefs, page 101, and decided to give it a try.  The recipe uses a rye sourdough starter.  It also has a high percentage of instant yeast and molasses, which is 4.7% and 19%, respectively, of total flour, rye gains and seeds.  The approx. dough hydration is 84%. 


The bread is exceptionally moist and flavourful.  For a person who does not normally like a lot of rye flour in bread, I find this bread quite delicious.  The bitterness from the Black Strap Molasses that I used, together with all the grains and seeds and the fermented rye flour, formed a very interesting flavor and texture.


There is something, however, not quite how I would like it in a fully-loaded bread like this one that, if no changes were made to the recipe, I would probably not make it again.  As with the Chinese concept of ying (feminine) and yang (masculine), for something to be balanced, there has to be a ying and a yang element simultaneously.  For instance, the enjoyment of a fatty and salty pork chop (the yang) is enhanced if it is eaten with, say, apple sauce (the ying) - the sourness in the apple sauce cuts through the fat while the sweetness in the fruit compliments the saltiness in the meat.  Another example: the best chocolate lava cake would have some salt in there, or the sweetness would make you sick. 


The issue with this bread for me is: it is perhaps a tad too masculine (too much "yang") because of all the rye grains and seeds in the recipe.  I have no doubt that there are plenty of people who love this bread just the way it is.  I just have a difference taste.  To address the imbalance to my taste, I am adding apple puree as a hydration for the final dough.  Also, I have changed the formula to a sourdough version.   I find molasses an attractive ingredient to add to a bread full of rye, grains, and seeds but I cut it down in my formula (below) as too much molasses makes the bread bitter (which some people may find it an attractive taste).  Here is my Swedish Sourdough Rye Bread with apple puree:


 


               


                                            SP's Swedish Sourdough Rye Bread with apple puree


 


My formula for Swedish Sourdough Rye Bread with Apple


Day 1 - soaker



  • 330 g water

  • 125 g crushed rye grains

  • 43 g rye meal flour (whole rye flour)

  • 83 g sunflower seeds

  • 53 g linseeds (flax seeds)

  • 11 g salt

  • 68 g rye sourdough starter (or any ripe starter) @100% hydration


Mix all the ingredients together and let stand at room temperature for 12 hours or at least overnight. 


Also on Day 1 - rye sourdough starter (Note: Mathias Dahlgren's original recipe uses instant yeast and so there is no rye sour build.)



  • 20 g any ripe starter @ 100% hydration

  • 123 g medium rye flour

  • 70 g water


Mix the ingredients together and let stand at room temperature for 12 hours or until ripe. 


Day 2 - final dough



  • 110 g medium rye flour

  • 123 g white flour

  • 713 g all of the soaker

  • 213 g all of the rye sourdough starter

  • 70 - 100 g molasses (Note: Mathias Dahlgren's original recipe has 140 g of molasses but I find at that quantity the bread is a bit bitter.)

  • 345 g of cooked Granny Smith apple puree or shopped-bought apple sauce  (To make your own apple puree, steam 320 g of chopped Granny Smith until cooked, then puree it with 25 g of honey)


Total dough weight 1585 g; estimated dough hydration 84 - 85%.


Procedure



  1. Mix half of the apple puree with molasses and the other half with the starter. 

  2. Then, mix all ingredients together until thoroughly combined. 

  3. Grease two bread tins. Divide the dough by two and place them in the bread tins. Cover and let rise in a warm place for 3 hours (my room temperature was 28 - 30 C). 

  4. Pre-heat oven to 220C / 425F.  Bake with some steam for the first 3 - 5 minutes, then lower the heat to 185C / 365F and bake for a further 40 minutes. 

  5. Turn out the loaves immediately after baking and let cool on a wire rack (or the bottom will be soggy). 


 


                        


 


My father-in-law and his wife came to stay for Christmas.  They are very discerning diners and both keep in good shape.  They have been told by their doctor to NOT have too much bread made of wheat flour and that if they must have bread, rye and spelt breads are the best.  Whenever they come to visit, I try to make rye and/or spelt sourdough for them.  For today's lunch I served this bread.  They loved it.


 


        


 


                                  


 


Tomorrow morning, when my father-in-law and his wife leave, they will have this little prezzie, all nicly sliced-up to go.


 


                                                      


 


Shiao-Ping

moxiemolly's picture
moxiemolly

Day 2 of my year to master bread making. OK, maybe not "master" but at least get a firm grasp on bread making. I was the lucky recipient of a cuisinart this holiday and have decided to make good use of it. My mother is what I would call a master of the dough but she has years and years of experience. As a 30 year old, newly-wed, fourth year medical student I figure now is the time to start! 


These loaves are from the King Arthur Baking book recipe for baguettes, as you can see I am sticking to the boulle until I can get other things right, namely the sponge, or crumb of my loaf. So far everything comes out looking beautiful and tasting nice but looking like sandwich bread on the inside. These are my second attempt and they are made with a poolish and autolysing step. The flavor is much more developed but the crumb leaves much to be desired. Next attempt will be after I sit for step 2 of the board exams, an eight hour exam I have in two days. Any suggestions about developing the crumb are more than welcome!  I am excited to have found this wonderful resource to help me along the way. Thanks for reading, Molly


 


Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven


Ready in 3 1/2 hours?  (Make it longer if you wish, use 1/2 teaspoon of yeast, add salt & caraway and use cold water to make it rise slower.)


Wheat shaped form ... White Bread   crusty



  • 450g hot water (you can just manage to keep a finger in it)

  • 7g instant yeast

  • 650 g Wheat flour (250g AP, 400g Bread flour)

  • 1 1/2  to 2 teaspoons table salt

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground caraway

  • olive oil for bowl & form


Pour hot water into a large 2.5 ltr. mixer bowl and sprinkle with yeast.  Add the flours and stir until all the flour is moistened and a shaggy dough has formed.  Cover and let stand 2 hours or until the dough has risen up to the cover.  Remove cover and scrape out dough onto a lightly floured surface.  Sprinkle with the salt and caraway.  Fold or roll up the dough and knead to blend for about two minutes.  Shape into a tight ball and cover with the bowl.


Soak top and bottom of a Clay form (total volume 2 liters) 10 min in warm water.  Allow to drip dry and surface water to absorb, one minute.  Smear inside with olive oil.  Re-shape and tighten dough to form a loaf.  Rub with oil and place into bottom form.   Oil the inside of cover and place over dough.  Set in cold oven for 15 minutes.   Turn on oven to 225°c  (440°F) on Hot air (convection) and time for 45 minutes.   Remove form and brown loaf another 5 minutes in hot oven on rack.   Cool on rack for 15 minutes and serve warm with bread knife on cutting board. 



 


I was given this form for Christmas without any instructions.  As you can see the ingredients add up to just over a kilo of dough, about the right amount to fill this two liter volume form.  The loaf crust is very crunchy and thick.  The crumb slightly chewy and tender.  I removed the top for the last 5 minutes of baking but wished I had removed the whole form to let the bottom brown more as well.   Slices are almost round and crumb is fine.  The oil in the form adds to an almost buttery flaky crust.   This loaf was sliced warm.



Mini


 


 

Smita's picture
Smita

Clint is doing well. Tried making a sandwich bread using sourdough starter. Heres what I did.


2 Nights before:
Added about a cup of whole wheat flour and half a cup of water to half a cup starter (100% hydration)


Day 1:
Added a cup of whole wheat flour, a cup of white whole wheat flour and a third cup of AP flour, 1.5 cups of water, 2 tsp salt, 1 tablespoon each butter and sugar.


Steps:
1. Mixed flours and water to get a shaggy dough. Rest for 30 mins (autolyse)
2. Added salt, butter, sugar and kneaded 8-10 minutes till the dough windowpaned.
3. Rest. Phew.
4. Bulk ferment for 90-120 minutes or till the dough doubles in volume, with stretch and folds every 30 minutes.
5. Shaped and stuck into a loaf pan.
6. Day 2. Pulled dough out of fridge and kept at room temperature for 2 hours. Baked at 375 for 40 minutes.


Results:
Soft and pillowy. Good crumb and rise. However, my shaping skills suck. Need to develop a feel for tension in the dough. Looked a bunch of YouTube videos but need to develop a better feel. Also want to try this with whole wheat flour instead of the white whole wheat. Just a personal taste preference. 


 



hannah's picture
hannah


for the recipe at my food blog, click HERE

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

 
I don't remember joining TFL on Christmas last year, but according to the time clock here, it was that evening. And so, to mark the occasion, naturally, I baked a cake.

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank everyone for making me feel welcome in the community. This is the nicest group of people I've encountered anywhere on the Internet---warm, friendly, supportive and encouraging. Thank you, you've made it a great year!

Arbyg's picture
Arbyg

Hello,


I had the urge to bake a little Ciabatta for Christmas so here are the results.  First batch in years so it needs some improvement.


Method:


62%hydration Biga


2.1%salt


80%water


1/2tsp inst. yeast


Flour KA 200g


biga 600g


Mix with hook until window pane fold once after 1hour, proof until double, bake 420 for30-35min

CaptainBatard's picture
CaptainBatard

Santa....there is some kind of a mistake....when i made my list I had a 20qt mixer and not 20qts of mixer...can you swing around on your way back from the other coast and make thing right...????


HOHOHO.....

wojo723's picture
wojo723

I just took my paska out of the oven to cool and snapped these pictures.  It's a traditional polish bread for Christmas Eve.  It's also enormous.  We have enough for dinner and use the leftovers for french toast on Christmas morning.



 


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