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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder


The boules are Vermont Sourdough from Jeffrey Hamelman's "Bread." I made these using a San Francisco Sourdough starter from Sourdo.com that sat, without being fed, in the way back of my refrigerator for at least 6 months. It had been a firm starter, and while looking kind of gray on the surface, came back to life after 4 feedings at 125% hydration. And by then, was really, really happy to be making bread.


The Vermont Sourdough has a crunchy crust and chewy crumb. The flavor is just about perfect - moderate sourdough tang but not so sour as to mask the complexity of the wheat flavors. 



Vermont Sourdough Crumb


The bâtards are my San Joaquin Sourdough. No crumb shots or tasting notes on these. They are being frozen to take on a family vacation next week.


David

ejm's picture
ejm

Twisted Bread Rings

The first time that I made these twisted bread rings, we were sorry they were so large. It made it difficult to cook them on the barbecue because two trays were required. So this time, I made smaller rings and fit them all onto one tray.


I love these making these rings. They’re SO easy to shape!


I used sesame seeds for half the rings and kalonji (nigella seeds) for the other half. And we love the smaller rings!! But we can’t decide which seed covering we like better. What do you think? Here’s the recipe:



-Elizabeth



saumhain's picture
saumhain

I am living at my aunt's these days and it has been a real pain in the arse getting used to baking in here. The kitchen is like twice smaller than mine, the oven is electric which is good, but feels just... weird.


However, I managed to make three loaves already, all Hamelman's: with olives, 50% whole-wheat sourdough



and whole rye and wheat sourdough.



They all turned out really good and delicious, but the one with olives was obviously the best. That's exactly why no picture of it - it was all gone before I could grab my camera.

RobertS's picture
RobertS

First of all, kudos to everyone who has worked to make this such a wonderful, educational site. I am looking forward to participating in the fun here on Fresh Loaf.


I have been baking from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, and the BBA, for several months now, but have had no other experience of bread-making during my 69 years of life. I thought that Artisan Bread stripped things to their esentials until I came across Lahey/Bittman bread on You Tube. Made a pot yesterday, and must say the first time was a charm.  The crumb and crust are obviously excellent looking (though the crumb may well be too thick for some people), but I found the taste a little disappointing, after the long --- 19-hour ---- ferment. It was good, but not nearly so good as some Ancienne baguettes I made recently following BBA religiously. With those loaves, I died and went to heaven.


I have two questions: (1) does maxiumum taste seem to be an issue with this manner of baking? (2) if the fault was mine, does anyone have any suggestions re getting superior taste when using this method?

Kingudaroad's picture
Kingudaroad

After getting my first bread book for Fathers Day and after reading it cover to cover, I was inspired to try this recipe. The book is very insightful and really is a great book for basic fundamentals.



   I used high gluten flour, bought in bulk from Sun Harvest for the final dough and the firm starter. My mother starter behaved admirably, especially since it was used right out of the fridge and several days since its last feeding. I toasted the walnuts for 10 minutes at 350. I used 25% of the flour weight in walnuts and 15% blue cheese. If you don't like blue cheese do not make this bread. The entire house was overcome with the smell of baking blue cheese. I got a bit of purple tint from the walnuts.


 


   This is an amazing tasting combo for you blue cheese fans.


 


 

Aivaras's picture
Aivaras

There are couple miches I have baked.


2.9Kg JT's 85x3 Miche.


   


One of the largest breads I have made. Pretty much the same as MC interpretation, only I didn't retard and hydration was lower, about 65%.



1.5Kg Gerard Rubaud Miche.



35% starter (55% hydration, GR flour mixture 70% T55, 18% sifted T150, 9% T80 spelt and 3% sifted T150 rye), overall hydration 65-68%. First fermentation 4 hours, proof about 2 hours.


2.2Kg T80 Miche.




T80 flour, 30% starter (~60% hydration), overall hydration 65%, first fermentation about 3 hours, proof 2 hours.


2.2Kg Poilane Miche.



70% T80, 30% T80 spelt, 35% starter (55% hydration), overall hydration 65%. First fermentation 3 hours, proof about 2 hours.


2.2Kg Organic WW and Spelt Miche.



70% very finely sifted Organic Stone Ground T150 flour and 30% Organic T80 spelt flour. 25% starter (55% hydration), overall hydration 65%. First fermentation 4.5 hours, proof 2 hours.


1.8Kg Pain a l'Ancienne.



50% T55 flour, 45% sifted T150 flour, 4.5% spelt, 0.5% malted barley flour, everything else as described by Shiao-Ping.


Aivaras

sjboneils's picture
sjboneils

HELP!  My daughter took home a sourdough turtle from the Boudin Bakery on Fisherman's Warf in San Francisco.  She wants to save it forever.  What do we apply to it to preserve it so it doesn't rot?


Thanks!

siuflower's picture
siuflower


 


This week bake Jam-filled mini pockets


 


Siuflower

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Pain au Levain, delicate, well balanced flavor. Not sour at all. DH loved it, I prefer it a bit more sour. Borrowed this shape from SteveB's blog here



Another shape:



Nice open crumb, for a 65% dough, it's surprisingly open:



 


Now the semolina Sourdough, pretty straightforward formula, the dough indeed rose pretty fast just like the instruction says



I didn't mix sesame into the dough, put them on the surface instead. The shape is from "Amy's Bread". I like how the seam opened up during baking, and sesame got seperated on either side.



Open crumb, but holes are mostly distributed on the outside, probably due to the swirl shape



Made semolina pasta to go with the semolina sourdough above



With homemade pesto sauce & a generous piece of salmon, yum!




 

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci


I like to save these for special occasions because their elegance is truly fitting for those special moments. I make them for family gatherings and think they are a nice summer biscotti because of the ingredients of dates; pineapple, Maraschino cherries and walnuts. They make a very pretty summer cookie tray.


 


http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2010/06/24/assunta’s-italian-stuffed-biscotti/



 

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