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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy came up with a versatile 50% whole grain Kamut recipe that can be used to make any number of different breads by adding in what ever is handy or even left overs.

 

The basic recipe was crafted at 80% hydration and not too high for this much whole grain.  The levain was 15% of the total flour, 100% hydration and retarded for 24 hours after the 3 stage build.  The sifted out hard bits from the whole Kamut were used to feed the levain and get them as wet for as long as possible.

 

We did a 1 hour autolyse with the dough flour and water with the salt sprinkled on top as the retarded levain warmed up on a heating pad.  Once the autolyse came together with the levain we did 3 sets of slap and folds of 7, 1 1and 1 minute - all 15 minutes apart.

 

We did these 2 breads separately, but…. you could double the amounts listed for the non add ins and this would be the point where you would separate the dough in 2 pieces for the different breads.

 

We then did 3 sets of stretch and folds from the compass points on 20 minute intervals.  We incorporated the add ins on the first set of stretch and folds.  One got prunes and seeds and the other got left over Malbec Kamut risotto for the previous dinner that was unique and tasty all on its own.

 

The dough was then pre-shaped, shaped, placed in proofing baskets, bagged and retarded in the fridge for 12 hours.  The next morning the dough was rested for 1 &1/2 hours on the counter to warm up before hitting the heat together that Big Old Betsy was putting out at 500 F with Mega Steam installed and billowing.

 

After 15 minutes the steam was removed and the bread continued to bake for another 20 minutes when it hit 205 F and was removed to a cooling rack.  The both sprang and bloomed OK with the prune bread and seeds coloring up and browning much better than the risotto bread - probably due to the sugar in the prunes.

 

On the crumb side, the risotto bread was much more open then the seeded prune bread for some reason but it was not as open as the 100% Whole Kamut bake even though is was only 50% whole grain.  How these things happen is a mystery to  Lucy but so is her food bowl and squeaky  toys.

 

Happily both of these breads tasted totally different but delicious in the their own way   The prune and seed bread was more sweet, hearty and nutty while the risotto bread was just plain unique and first time we have had a grain risotto with a red wine in any bread.  Both breads are worth making and everyone was impressed with how different they were.

 

Whole Kamut SD Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

10 Week Retarded Rye Starter

8

0

0

8

1.98%

85% Extraction Kamut

0

6

28

34

8.42%

15% Extraction Kamut

14

10

0

24

5.94%

Water

14

16

28

58

14.36%

Total

36

32

56

124

30.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

62

15.35%

 

 

 

Water

62

15.35%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

15.35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

85% Extraction Kamut

142

35.15%

 

 

 

KA Bread Flour

200

49.50%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

342

84.65%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.98%

 

 

 

Water

262

64.85%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.61%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

404

 

 

 

 

Liquid w/ Starter

324

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

80.20%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

876

 

 

 

 

% Whole Kamut

50.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed Mix

72

17.82%

 

 

 

Prunes

68

16.83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed Mix includes: ground flax, sesame, poppy and chia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malbec & Kamut Risotto

158

39.11%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Risotto includes: red onion, Kamut, Malbrc, chicken 

 

 

stock with Pecorino Romano and Parmesan cheeses

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

More than 2 years ago Lucy and I baked out first 100% Kamut Bread that was at 102% hydration.  Back then we weren't using straight rice flour in out baskets and the dough stuck causing a nasty disfigurement here:

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/30081/100-hydration-100-whole-grain-kamut-flat-boule-yw-and-sd-combo-starter

 The bread tasted fine and the crumb was fairly open due to the YW and SD combo levain we used.  We also ground the whole berries in a Krup’s coffee grinder since we didn’t have a grain mill till much later.  We thought we would give it another go to try to fix some of these earlier problems.

 

Lucy decide to add a small amount of whole grain Kamut sprouted flour to the mix this time and to only use a Kamut SD levain  leaving the YW out which I thought would be a mistake since YW really opens up the crumb of whole grain breads so well.   She didn’t want the YW to cancel at the sour as it does when mixed in the SD levain.

 

The sprouted Kamut was soaked  for 4 hours then drained and sprouted for 24 hours in a sprouter before being paper towel dried and then air dried in the Arizona sun over 4 hours to make sure the enzymes we released were not harmed by high heat.

 

We did our usual 3 stage levain build where we used the 15% extracted hard bits of the milled Kamut to get the levain up to speed.  We did not use any sprouted flour hard bits for the levain but we did put the sprouted flour into the autolyse with the 85% extraction of the non sprouted Kamut.

 

Since the sprouted grain went into the autolyse we limited it to 1/2 hour so it wouldn’t spike the autolyse into enzymatic overload.   Then the levain and the salt were added before a short mix with a spoon and 8 minutes of slap and folds.  During the slap and folds we adjusted the final dough water with small additions to fit the final mix feel as it was slapped around without learning a lesson.

 

We ended up at around 90% hydration which was 12% lower than the bake 2 years ago.  We think the sprouted flour was the difference plus we wanted a less wet mix since we planned on an 18 hour retard instead of 12 hours. After a 30 minute rest we did 3 sets of stretch and folds from the compass points on 30 minute intervals to finish off the gluten development.  

 

This got us to the 2 hour mark since mixing and we let the dough rest for 10 minutes before shaping into a squat oval, putting it a basket, bagging it and putting it in the fridge for long cold retard.

 

18 hours later it had proof sufficiently to warm up on the counter as Big Old Betsy was heated to ramming speed of 550 F when the Mega Steam went in for 15 minutes before the dough was un-molded onto parchment on a peel, slashed and slid onto the bottom stone for 15 minutes of steam.  Once the steam came out the oven was turned down to 425 F or another 10 minutes of baking until the inside hit 210 F – our new standard temperature for sprouted flour bread.

 

The thing to remember about Kamut is that it has a pretty good protein percent but it is very extensible and not very elastic.  The protein gluten isn’t the kind one would normally pick for bread that wasn’t going to be panned up when over 80% hydration like this one at 87.5%.   This dough was slack but it didn’t stick to the basket this time.

 We expected it to spread after it was un-molded due to the grain used and the sprouts too.  but it did try to puff itself up some in the heat of the oven and did bloom a bit.  The crust came out that beautiful orange tinged color that a durum derivative grain is so famous for.  It came out of the oven crispy but it went soft as it cooled.

 The yellow crumb also associated with durum was the other striking feature.  The crumb was open for 100% whole grain bread. It was soft and very moist due to the sprouts.  The best part was the taste though.  Nothing tastes as sweet as Kamut and the sprouts made is taste like it has a bit of sweet cornbread in it – maybe that was the color affecting my tongueJ

 This is one fine bread and if you want it to look like a majestic tall loaf, just pan it up instead but….you will miss the higher percent of tasty crust with a boule.

 

Whole KamutSD Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

9 Week Retarded Rye Starter

6

0

0

6

1.39%

85% Extraction Kamut

0

0

24

24

5.57%

15% Extraction Kamut

6

12

0

18

4.18%

Water

6

12

0

18

4.18%

Total

18

24

24

66

15.31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

45

10.44%

 

 

 

Water

21

4.87%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

46.67%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

10.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

85% Extraction Kamut

326

75.64%

 

 

 

100% Whole Sprouted Kamut

60

13.92%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

386

89.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.86%

 

 

 

Water

332

77.03%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

86.01%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

431

 

 

 

 

Liquid w/ Starter

353

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

87.47%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

816

 

 

 

 

% Whole Kamut

100.00%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Sprouted Kamut

13.92%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kaipea's picture
Kaipea

 

Made this bread recipe a day ago. :) It was delicious! The crust is really crunchy, crumb is chewy. Since I don't have a Dutch oven (nor a proofing basket) I baked the dough on a cookie sheet so I didn't get that pretty bread on the cover nevertheless the bread is great!

   
a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

I'm still on this 5% levain, 80% hydration kick! Both of these loaves built on the formula I referred to in my previous post.

The first was inspired by Dave's recent rosemary and black olive loaf. I just added a tablespoon of fresh rosemary, 60 g black olives, and 60 g green olives:

And then the formula, with the addition of 100 g of old dough, which reduced the fermentation time by about 2 hours, and made the loaf many times more fragrant (pate fermentee is amazing, even in small amounts):

Maybe not the ideal crumb for sandwiches...but pretty good with olive oil and cracked pepper!

--Hannah

greenbriel's picture
greenbriel

Taking a brief break from my baguette obsession, yesterday I decided to try something different, and Jason's quick ciabatta recipe posted by LilDice seemed perfect. Short turnaround, and I'd never dealt with such a high hydration (95%) dough before.

What a great recipe! Certainly entertaining and challenging slinging all that goop around! I think they came out well for the first try. I messed up by being impatient and trying to squeeze all four onto my baking sheet peel to bake at the same time, should have taken LilDice's advice and done two batches. One of the four ended up vaguely slipper shaped, the rest were more lung and liver shaped ;) Have to work on that next time. I did invert on the way from bench to peel, and it did seem to avoid the "bubbles all at the top" issue that some folks had. All had nice crust and crumb, and for such a short fermentation, tasted great. We had caprese sandwiches for dinner last night with a nice caesar salad.

Back to baguettes now! Woke up early to start the 12 hour cold autolyse for TXfarmer's legendary 36+ hour sourdough baguettes. Meep! 

Loving TFL!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Basically a 1-2-3 Sourdough formula using two fresh baby Rye and Einkorn sourdough starters.  Started respectfully on Friday and Thursday of last week, this is their first loaf.  Last night they had peaked in activity (4 and 3 days old) and I combined:

1)   215g sourdough starter,  predominantly a rye sour 

2)   350g water with 50g Whole Einkorn flour Tangzhong.      Making a 70% hydration dough

3)   600g of flour:  100g fine Rye, 100g Whole Einkorn, 200g fine Spelt, and 200g Organic AP wheat.  (not much strength there!)

   14g salt    14g Bread Spice

Mixed up, covered and let sleep 16°C overnight or 14 hrs.  It did rise about 1/2 so did one set of folds in the morning followed by a shaping.  The dough just seemed to be far enough along at 11 am that no other handling seemed needed.   Banneton rise at 24°C.   

Bake 240°C for 20min with steam pan.  Remove steam, rotate,  reduced to 200°C for 20 minutes.  Inside temp 100°C (212°F)

hreik's picture
hreik

My guru Abe, suggested I post this here.  I am new to sour dough but am hooked after just 4 bakes. I followed Hamelman's recipe, though with a much higher hydration %age (though he does say, "adjust the hydration"). 

Made 2 loaves: one the same day as mix, the 2nd after overnight in the fridge.  I should've refrigerated #2 right away, but we went out to dinner and I left it out a bit before over-nighting it and it over-proofed a bit. Was easier to score tho. Pics below. The nice topshot is of the 2nd loaf, the first pics of the same day bake.

crumbsideTopshot

 

keepycooks's picture
keepycooks

Wanted to try something new.My mom had gotten a beer that she didn't like so we had 3 bottles that weren't going to be drank. I thought, why not soak some oats in it. The beer was River Horse oatmeal milk stout

I combined equal parts beer and oats and let it sit over night while my levain came up to peak leavening power. I mixed 200 grams each AP and rye flour. Next was 135 grams of 80% levain and 275 grams of that soaker. 280 grams of 88 degree water. Autolyse for an hour and mix in 10 grams of salt. 3 stretch and folds every half hour or so. Let 8t rise four 5 hours and then shaped and rolled in oats. Proofed in the fridge over night. 15 mins with steam at 475. Then 20 at 425 without steam. 

I haven't cut into it yet but it smells marvelous

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

Phew. I've baked for a number of friends over the last few days! Many of them just wanted or needed a very generalized designation of "bread" for events, so I was able to experiment a bit with sourdough baking.

Disclaimer: All ciabatte described are "pre-dabrownman-flip-recommendation," so don't judge me too harshly...I still haven't acquired a second pastry scraper, so all ciabatta experiments are on a temporary hold...

Saturday, I baked some whole wheat ciabatte and a few small simple batards.

also, a small parmesan-encrusted boule, and a small sesame-encrusted batard.

 

Then on Sunday, a few more ciabatte -- this time with cream cheese and chive. 

 

And then just this morning, Monday, before work: A simple 80% hydration batard with 5% levain. Still working on my shaping. Still striving for those ears. 

Because my friend just emailed me saying that this was her favorite bread I've given her, I'll post a very basic formula:

Ingredients:

425 g AP flour

50 g whole wheat flour

375 g water 

5 g wheat germ

11 g salt

10 g sugar (in place of 5 g malt)

50 g 100% hydration white starter 

Steps:

1) Mix flour and water, and autolyse at room temperature for 6-12 hours. 

2) Incorporate all other ingredients using the pincer method. This should take about 4 minutes. You'll notice that because the dough was already so wet, incorporating that small amount of 100% hydration levain, salt, sugar, and wheat germ is a surprisingly smooth process. 

3) Stretch and fold vigorously every 30 minutes for 3 hours. The number of turns depends on how the dough feels! Anywhere from 1-4 turns (4-16 folds), each session, performing the turns until the whole mass of dough wants to lift from the container.  

4) Rest on the counter for 8-12 hours, until dough has increased 80% - 100%, but no more.

5) Retard for 2-24 hours.

6) Sprinkle flour over the top of the dough in the container, and allow the flour to coat the edges as you gently release it. Pour onto a floured surface and rest for 10 minutes.

7) Shape and place seam-side up in a a brotform of some kind, cover with plastic, and proof at room temperature for 1.5 hours. 

8) Place  the brotform in the freezer for 15 minutes (I really like this freezer trick for high-hydration doughs proofed at room temperature...I genuinely think it helps with ovenspring!).

9) Score and bake at 460 for 20 minutes with steam, 25 minutes without.

The recipient has confirmed the appropriateness of the loaf for egg-dipping. 

More soon!

--Hannah

greenbriel's picture
greenbriel

I apologize, these posts must be getting pretty boring, but if I can't document my baguette obsession here, I don't know where else to turn. :)

Today's are 40% w/w straight same-day dough (my starter is being a bit ornery).

I think shaping and scoring is better than yesterday's batch, the one on the left I'm almost happy with. Ears! Crumb is obviously not as good looking, but I assume that's the wholewheat flour. Crust was better than usual because I followed advice (found on TFL, I think) to leave the loaves to cool in the oven with the door open for a while after baking. Worked great. They taste good!

Cheers, happy baking!

-Gabe

 

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