The Fresh Loaf

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loydb

I've been on hiatus since we moved back to Austin, but since we're now in the middle of a flour and bread shortage (because apparently everyone is suddenly going to bake!), I've started milling flour for myself and my friends, and am back to baking my own again.

I don't currently have an active starter, so this is a yeasted loaf, about 75% fresh milled hard white wheat and 25% KABF.

 

loydb's picture
loydb

This is a continuation of tweaking Maurizio Leo's Best Sourdough Recipe My first efforts can be found in my blog here.

My goal is to see how far I can push the freshly-milled whole grain percentage while still getting great oven spring. For this pass, I swapped out the 35g bread flour in the levain for whole wheat, and ended up using 250g of whole wheat and 700g of bread flour for the final dough, giving me roughly 25% whole grain. Because of how my freshly milled flour handles water, I ended up adding an additional 80g of whole wheat flour above and beyond the totals called for in the recipe. It was still a very wet dough, but it was much more workable than the first try, and built structure way faster.

The crumb still came out great, though. I'll try pushing it further next time!

 

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loydb

Back when I first started this blog, I was trying out the San Francisco starter from sourdo.com. I was never able to get a flavor I loved from it. Almost six years down the line, I've learned a ton about sourdough in the interim. I was also growing bored with the rye strain I've been baking with for the last few years -- so I'm trying again with it. I've been building the starter for the last week, finally it was active enough to use.

Maurizio Leo's The Perfect Loaf is one of my favorite baking blogs, so I decided to try his Best Sourdough Recipe.

For the whole wheat portion, I used fresh-milled organic hard red Spring wheat. For the white flour, KA bread flour. This is a really high hydration dough. I didn't quite pour it into the bannetons, but it wasn't by any means even vaguely stiff.

 Bannetons

 

Peel


It came out of the basket really nicely (rice flour), even if it was nearly flat. The oven, with a cloche inside, was preheated for an hour at 500 degrees F. After 25 minutes, I removed the top and dropped the temp to 450, and left it in for another 20 minutes, turning it halfway through. No convection.

I'm happy with the result. I'm hoping it gets a little more sour with time. Next time, I'm going to try upping the percentage of whole grain flour -- it has less than 10% right now.

 

Second Loaf

 

Crumb

 

loydb's picture
loydb

I've been very quiet -- mainly because I've spent the last year baking the same recipe over and over, tweaking it slightly until I've got it completely reproducible. I've varied the additions (various seeds, dried fruits, etc.), but the base bread has been the same. For 2018, I'm going to venture out of this comfort zone and get more experimental again.

 

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loydb

I've been working on this recipe for about 5 weeks now, I think this is loaf #11. It has finally started coming together like I want. 20% sprouted rye sourdough, 35% sprouted hard red wheat sourdough starter, 45% KABF, 75% hydration. I'm doing another couple of loaves on Sunday repeating this recipe, if I'm still happy with it then I'll do a detailed post.

 

 

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loydb

I had about 500g extra of my 100% hydration WW start (90% hard red winter wheat, 10% rye), and needed to bake a loaf for some friends, plus some for us. I wanted a bit more rise than I've been getting with 100% WW, so I used AP for half the flour bill (Reinhart's basic sourdough recipe). I'm really happy with how it came out. 

 

edit: Crumb Shot

 

loydb's picture
loydb

I started up a new starter culture last week using Sourdo's Polish Rye. It is now working well enough that I'm starting to have extra levain, so the first thing I made with it were sourdough pancakes. I really liked Knead_Love's "Meditation on Sourdough Pancakes" blog entry (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32308/meditation-sourdough-pancakes), so I used that as my base recipe with the following mods:

* Tripled the batch size, except for the brown sugar, which I just doubled (4 T total)

* Instead of AP flour, I milled 90% hard red spring wheat and 10% rye (the same ratio in the starter)

* Melted butter instead of oil

* I make them huge

They came out delicious!

Add blueberries on the raw side

 

 

One side done

 Finished the other side

loydb's picture
loydb

Being a 3-minute drive from Seven Stars Bakery here in Providence meant that I essentially stopped baking (other than the occasional buttermilk biscuit or cornbread) for 2013. I've resolved to change that for 2014, and have already made my first loaf of 2014 (Reinhart's transitional wheat sandwich bread).

Happy New Year (a little late) to everyone!

 

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loydb

I'm continuing with the theme of 'corn' this week. This time, I'm starting with a 50/50 mix of Heartland Mill's organic blue and yellow corn. It took me a little time to get the mill dialed in for the coarseness I was after -- and I ended up sifting out roughly 50% of the meal, leaving me with true grits (and a bunch of corn flour for my next loaf of bread).

I had a cup or so of a mixture of onion, hot peppers and garlic left over from making tacos the other night, so I used it as the base for the polenta along with chicken stock and (at the very end) butter and shredded cheddar cheese. After 45 minutes in the oven (stirring every 10 minutes), I had a nice creamy polenta that I served with marinara sauce and sour cream. The rest of the polenta was poured into a baking tray and put in the fridge. I'll grill it up over the next few days as a side dish.

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loydb

Saturday was pickup day for Pioneer Valley's grain CSA. I am really impressed with the variety and quality of the grains and beans we got. I'll do a more extensive post on what we got later, but here's the first cooking effort. I used the same recipe from my blue corn cornbread entry, using Red Llamas Wheat and Mandan Bride Corn.

The Bride Corn kernels were so big that my mill had a hard time 'grabbing' them and pulling them into the stone. I ended up having to mill it twice -- the first time with the outer wheel very loose to get a coarse, rough grind, and then a second pass at a finer setting. It was a pain in the butt, but it worked.

The flavor of the final product was superb, I paired the bread with a berebere-rubbed pot roast with yams and carrots.

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