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golgi70's picture
golgi70

I decided to go back to the 5 Grain Levain from Week 26 found here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/37954/farmers-market-26-five-grain-levain.  

I made two major changes.

First, I increased the hydration by a total of 13% in the dough portion.  

Second, I  decreased the PF in half from 25% to 12%.  I kept it split 7% liquid levain and 5% rye sour.  

Another change I made which I suppose was significant but not as much so as the priors is the soak(which could be any combination of seeds/grains).  Our local COOP has Rolled Rye and I thought to use it in place of the called for Rye Chops (which I subbed with Bulgar last time).  I also subbed toasted sesame for the sunflower seeds this time around.  So all in all it's equal parts toasted sesame, toasted steel cut oats, flax, and rolled rye.  I gave the loaves about an hour to proof before retarding overnight and an hour to warm up before being baked.  I'm very happy with the results and the only change I think I'll make will be upping the hydration just a touch further.  

 

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5 Grain Levain

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Rye Sour (5% Prefermented Flour @ 82% hydration) 12 hours @ 73F

Liquid Levain (7% Prefermented Flour @ 125% hydration) 12 hours @ 73F

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Soaker (Seeds mixture = 30% of total flour)  Make Soaker at the same time as the levain/sour

25% each toasted sesame, toasted steel cut oats, flax, and rolled rye

125% boiling water

1% Salt (1% the weight of the soaker grains)

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Flour: (65% CM Bakers Craft, 25% Hard White Wheat, 10% stone milled whole rye)

H20:  (75% holding back 50-100g to help add soaker/salt)

Salt:  2%

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Make Levain/Rye Sour and Soaker (12hours)

Autolyse with preferments 1 hour

Add soaker and combine well using some of held back water.  

Add salt and mix with remaining water to medium development.

Bulk Ferment 3 1/2 hours with 3 folds at :40, 1:20, and 2:00 

Divide and preshape loosely.  Rest 15-20 minutes.  

Shape into boules/batards in rice floured bowls.  Let proof 1 hour at room temp and then retard 12-15 hours. 

Bake 480 with steam for `15 minutes, vented for 25-30 more.

 

 

 

 

emkay's picture
emkay

I've been baking mostly boules at home since the cast iron combo cooker has been my method for generating steam. Sometimes I just feel like having a loaf pan-shaped bread, but I still want to have all those hearth bread qualities.

My favorite naturally leavened loaf pan breads in the city are from Outerlands and Josey Baker. Outerlands sells only one kind of bread since it's a restaurant not a bakery. You can see his levain bread in this Tartine video http://vimeo.com/14354661 at around 2:30. The other bread is the "wonder bread" from Josey Baker which is the opposite of that supermarket  fluff bread of the same name. It's tangy, chewy and moist with a crispy, crackly crust. Perfect for PB&J (or, if you prefer something fancy, almond butter sprinkled with Maldon sea salt and drizzled with rooftop honey).

For this week's bake I decided to make a naturally leavened bread in a loaf pan just like the ones I mentioned. I used Ken Forkish's overnight country blonde formula. This was my first time using this fomula so I prepared myself by reading TFL posts from others who have already tried it. The "overnight" bulk fermentation at room temperature seemed to be where people had some problems. I mixed my dough late at night so that I would be awake in the morning to catch the dough before it would triple. It's fairly cool in my house (68F/20C) so my 11 hour bulk fermentation seemed to be in line with Forkish's 12-15 hour timeline. My dough didn't have as many bubbles along the sides of the container as I would have liked, but the dough was already 2.5 times the original size so I decided to proceed with shaping.


ocbl_loaf_1b

Dough proofed at room temp for 4 hours then I baked it at 425F on a stone covered with a stainless steel bowl for 20 minutes and uncovered for another 20 minutes. Then I removed the bread from the loaf pan and baked it directly on the stone for 5 minutes.
ocbl_loaf_1c

ocbl_loaf_1d

The crumb was moist and chewy. The crust was crispy for a few hours out of the oven, but softened by the next day. It was quite sour just the way I like it!
ocbl_loaf_1e

My results were very close to what I get at Outerlands and Josey Baker, so overall I was quite pleased.
outerlands

JBBwonderbread

I also baked some bourbon pecan pie chocolate brownies.
pecan_pie_brownie_2

pecan_pie_brownie_3

pecan_pie_brownie_1

Happy Mother's Day to all!

:) Mary

linder's picture
linder

We've moved to Orcas Island, Washington and while our house is being built we are living in a 16 ft diameter yurt.  it is cozy to say the least.  Here is my bread kneading station set up in the yurt on top of our clothes dresser.

I'm baking the bread in a Coleman oven that sits on top of the propane camp stove burner.  In the oven I have unglazed tiles on the bottom to equalize and retain heat.  The thermometer on the front of the oven is unreliable so an over thermometer inside the oven is a must to know what the temperature is in the oven.

The bread came out really well.  The recipe I've been using is Peter Reinhart's whole wheat bread from Whole Grain Baking.  Next step - San Francisco Sourdough baked in a dutch oven over charcoal in a firepit.  

isand66's picture
isand66

I have been wanting to try this recipe since I saw the post about it on the A Breaducation site here.

CHERRYBLOSSOM

The crumb on his bake was nothing short of fantastic and looked like it would melt in your mouth.

I followed his directions mostly with a few exceptions.  I used my Bosch Universal mixer to mix up the dough for the most part except I did mix the salt in by hand.  I also held back around 25-30 grams of water in the final dough as I felt it was already more than hydrated enough which I believe was the right decision.  I used freshly ground whole wheat in the starter and in the main dough along with KAF bread flour.  I omitted the wheat germ like he did but next time I would definitely add it for some extra flavor.  I also baked this on my stone rather than in a covered dutch oven.

Since he used the dutch oven I think it did really help him get such a dark crust so maybe next time I will try that as well.

CLOSEUP1

He let his dough bulk ferment for 4 hours and I only did it for 3 hours which was more than sufficient in my case.

In the end I am really happy with how this turned out.  The crumb is nice and open with a custard like feel and the bread tastes great.

CRUMB1

CLOSEUP2

CRUMBCLOSEUP

For the next go around I would add more whole wheat flour and I'm also going to use the porridge method with some different grains.  I want to try and use the porridge method using my usual technique with a larger amount of starter and a cold bulk fermentation and see if I can get similar results.

Happy Baking and Happy Mother's Day!

FLOWER1

FLOWERS2

HOSTACLOSEUP

BIRDFEEDERS

 

Shai's picture
Shai

Hello all, this is my first post over here :)

Iv'e been learning from this site for a long while now, and thought it's time to start posting the results.

This is my third or so attempt at baking a sabbatical with the goal of creating a nice, open, crumb - and I think I've finally nailed it.

The recipe is based at the recipe from "Baking Artisan Bread" by Ciril Hitz.

Made a 1:1 poolish and left it to ferment 16 hours overnight.

Final dough:

  • Bread flour 100%
  • Cold water 66%
  • Yeast 1%
  • Salt 3%
  • Poolish (1:1) 107%

    Hydration of final dough is 77%

Mixed poolish with yeast, most of the water (85% of them), and a few tablespoons of the flour - until aerated.

Added rest of flour and kneaded in mixer for a few minutes, until a sticky but formed and homogeneous dough was formed.

Left to autolyse for 30 min.

Added salt and kneaded in mixer for 13 minutes, during which I've slowly incorporated the leftover water. Dough should be somewhat developed by now.

Poured sticky dough into an oiled oven sheet. Left to rest (covered) for 25 min.

Preformed a double stretch and fold sequence. Left to rest for another 25 minutes

Repeat until 4 double S&Fs where preformed. Finish with 25 minute rest.

Flour top of dough and work surface with lots of flour.

Flipped dough and let fall from oven sheet onto the working surface.

Flipped half of dough over itself and floured it's top.

cut dough into apx 220g pieces.

cut a thin strip of dough from each piece and stick it on top of it (this will result in a weak spot that will allow the bread to expend without the need of scoring the sticky dough).

Flip the dough pieces onto a well floured couche. Flour top part of dough.

Cover and let proof for about 20 min (use finger pocking test).

Flip pieces again and place on a baking steel, placed in the middle of a super hot oven (I've preheated mine for an hour with broiler on max).

Poured a cup of hot water into a pan at the bottom of the oven. Spray oven walls with water.

Baked for 7 minutes, until oven spring has ended, and the breads no longer expand.

Reduce thermostat to 250 deg C, open oven and remove steam pan.

Continue baking for 10 to 15 minutes with oven door slightly open - until crust is browned to your preference. Bread inner temp should be at least 98 deg C (100 deg in my case).

Turned of oven heating and left to cool in oven with convection on for 10 minutes. (I've flipped the breads on their tops, so that the bottom won't continue baking from the steel leftover heat).

Remove excess flour from bread crust.

Crumb was open, soft and tasty.

Crust a little to dark and hard to my liking (Iv'e managed to injure my inner cheek...).

Taste was good for a lean yeasted bread, but I would like to improve it.

 

Made awesome sandwiches with some moldy cheese and fresh vegetables.

 

 

Thank you for reading, I'll appreciate feedback!

    - Shai Noy

Doughtastic's picture
Doughtastic

I recently made a loaf of sourdough from a recipe I found on shipton mill site. The dough looked great the best I've ever made. I don't have a proving basket yet so I floured a tea towel and placed it in a bowl over night (longer than the recipe stated) by morning it looked fantastic more than doubled and sprung back when prodded I tiped the bread out only to find it stuck to the tea towel and ruined has any one got any advice  

cerevisiae's picture
cerevisiae

Yesterday I was struck with the urge to make a poolish, and mixed up 50% KAF AP with 50% high extraction spelt, water, and a little instant yeast. It burbled away for a good 13, 14 hours, and then became fodder for two different doughs.

I followed Hamelman's Ciabatta with Wheat Germ and Olive Oil pretty exactly, and turned it into a small ciabatta and a little foccacia. Since I hadn't yet gotten the chance to try focaccia with grapes and fennel, I took this chance to do so. The crumb came out well enough, and the flavor combination was nice, but not a new favorite.

The focaccia was simply baked on a pan in a 460F oven, while the ciabatta got the dutch oven treatment, starting at 500F and dropping down to 460F after about five minutes. The crumb has yet to be revealed, but it looks like it probably came out okay. I bet it'll make a great roasted eggplant sandwich.

The rest of the poolish was turned into baguette dough, again following Hamelman, but subbing in 10% high extraction wheat and increasing the hydration slightly.

Not pleased with the baguette bake, but the results were edible. One of the two loaves is mostly gone.

I thought I had overproofed them, but if I did, it wasn't by much. Then they stuck to the makeshift peel I was using to transfer them to the actual peel.

Because they were so soft, I had trouble getting the scores right; mostly, not nearly deep enough. You can see where the baguette tried to tear itself apart a little.

I also clearly did not mutter the right incantations or leave enough milk out for the fairies, because Sylvia's Magic Towels did not produce the water vapor of my dreams. The crust is still pale from it's light coating of couche flour, soft and not crackly or shiny at all.

The crumb was fairly nice, though not amazing. The remaining little guy will get dissected later this weekend, assessed for crumb quality, and probably become delicious garlic bread.

cerevisiae's picture
cerevisiae

I'm making baguettes for the first time in quite a while, and pacing through the kitchen, fretting while I wait for the stone to heat up and hoping for good steam from a method I haven't used before. I'm eyeing my newly contrived lame, born of a visit to my boyfriend's shaving shelf and look through the kitchen drawers.

Did I overproof them? Is it already too late? What if I can't get enough steam? What if my scores are off? I wish I had extra dough I could practice on. Is it ready yet? Maybe I should've made more so I could've gotten more experience. Will my angles be off? Will they open nicely? At all? Should I put oil on the blade to make sure it doesn't stick? I wish the fridge were less full. I don't have space to put this pie dough anywhere.

...

Sometimes things just fall into place.

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I was inspired by Syd's bake to try my first Pain de Campagne.  I wasn't happy with the first bake, although my husband really enjoyed the taste and texture of the bread.  It was extremely light and made great sandwiches. As I often do, I froze the other half of the dough to make at a later date, and I baked it today.  As usual, my second bake from the frozen loaf turned out better than the first bake from fresh.  The first loaf didn't get much height, but had good crumb. The second loaf had much better oven spring and more height. Both had excellent, tangy taste. I have made a crumb comparison between the two loaves below. The first crumb shot is from the fresh loaf; the second is from the bake today. 

Crumb from the first bake.

Pain de Campagne (adapted from Syd’s recipe)

Levain

  • 50g mature whole wheat starter (mine was mixed)
  • 100g water
  • 100g whole wheat flour

Allow to peak.  This could take from 4-10 hours.  Mine took 8 hours.

Main Dough

  • 200g of the levain
  • 350g water
  • 50g rye
  • 1/2 tsp diastatic malt powder
  • 450g bread flour

Disperse the levain in the water with a wire whisk until there is a good foam on top. Next, whisk in rye and malt powder.  Then add bread flour with spatula and mix until all the flour has been moistened.

  • autolyse for 50-60 minutes

Then:

  • add 10g salt
  • knead to medium gluten development (if the dough is sticky, you can use your dough scraper.  Try not to add more flour.  Just enough for your surface and hands.

Now:

  • bulk ferment for 1-2 hours with a turn at 30 minutes (I left the dough for 2 hours and turned twice).

Next:

  • pre-shape
  • rest 10 minutes
  • final shape

Put into well floured banneton and after about half an hour cover and:

  • retard for 12 hours in the fridge
  • let the dough warm up just before the bake; you’ll see it rise a bit more

Bake

  •  at 500F in a covered baker for 30 minutes

Then:

  • Remove the lid and reduce heat to 435 convection, baking for another 20 - 25 minutes

If you don’t have a covered baker (Syd’s original instructions):

Bake

  •  at 230 C with steam for 15 minutes

Then:

  • reduce heat to 200 C and bake for a further 30 - 35 minutes

The proportionately large amount of levain in this recipe means that the dough develops really quickly hence the relatively short bulk fermentation time.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy has been gathering up ancient grains like farro and einkorn and Kamut and other allowed newer organic heirloom grains that are being replanted in small quantities in Arizona like Desert Durum, Pima Club and Sonoran White.

 

It is heartening that the folks at Hayden Mills and the O’Odham / Pima Indians at Ramona Farms are replanting these grains and offering them for sale - even if at steep prices.  It has been an interesting endeavor just to find some of these and talk to the people involved.

 

We know there are so many other grains out there that could be brought back to life but there is a reason why these grains went out of favor in the first place too and not many bread bakers can afford to spend $5-$7 a pound for these grains either.

 

One of Lucy’s recipes took the left over 85% extraction 7 grain flour from last Friday’s bake that already had farro and Kamut in the mix and added some Hayden Mills Desert Durum and Farro to it along with the Einkorn we found at Whole Foods to get the mix up to a real 9 grain bread.  I know that Lucy has an 11 or maybe even 13 grain variation in her someday.

 

Even though she already had some rye in the mix she tossed in some left over whole rye too just to get some whole grain in there even though this bread doesn’t need it being that the rest of the grains are 85% extraction. We have been wanting to make a bread like this for a while to see what getting the hardest bits out of the mix might  bring to the party.

 

The other bread is a 50% whole grain bread using Pima Club and White Sonoran for the whole grains and AP for the other 50%.  The two whole grains are white wheat varieties that are supposedly low in gluten so the AP was a good paring to keep the gluten low.

 

Folks think that these ’weak gluten’  flours are good for making tortillas, cookies and cakes and they are but eventually, we want to try them out on baguettes since they too are also made with low gluten flour – and pizza too.   I’m guessing, after seeing this bread from the outside, that it also can make some fine sourdough too.

 

The mis en place for ........................................................a fine Chinese 5 spice stir fry

The levain for the 9 grain was made with the same 85% extraction flour but the levain for the AZ bread was made from the 15% hard bits sifted out from the milling process.   If there are hard bits in the mix we like to put them into the levain build to get them a wet for as long as possible.  The other difference was that the levain for the 9 grain bread was refrigerated for 48 hours, 1 hour after the 3rd feeding and the AZ levain was not refrigerated at all.

 

Each of the breads had a 1 hour autolyse with the dough flour and water with the pink Himalayan sea salt sprinkled on top.  The hydration was 5% higher for the 9 grain at 80%.  Each went through 3 sets of slap and folds of 5, 1 and 1 minute on 15 minute intervals.

Oddly the 85% extraction dough felt much more slack and new thought it would be the other way around.   No stretch and folds or bulk ferment was done.  We quickly pre-shaped and then shaped a boule and an oval and placed the dough into the baskets, bagged them and retarded them for 14 hours.

 

First thing this morning we fired up Big Old Betsy for the 550 F regular bake preheating.   When she hit 525 F we put 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans and a larger one of David’s Lava Rocks.   Sylvia’s pans had rolled up kitchen towels in them and all 3 were half full of water.  By the time BOB hit 5560 F the steam was billowing.

 

A healthy breakfast and lunch should always be on the menu.We removed the dough from the fridge and the baskets by overturning them onto parchment on a peel.  We did a quick slash job on them and into the oven on the bottom stone they went.  After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 465 F and continued to steam for a total of 15 minutes.  Once the steam came out we turned the oven down to 425 F - convection this time.

The smaller AZ loaf was done in 30 minutes total and the larger 9 grain loaf took 5 minutes more.  Both sprang, bloomed browned up nicely with tiny blisters.  One was slightly darker than the other one though.  After coming out of the oven crunchy, the crust of both went soft as they cooled.

 

Lucy got all dolled up today for Mother's Day with a bath and some much needed grooming.

The crumb of both came out less open than we had hoped for but for bread this healthy and hearty it is still light enough, moist and soft.  Lucy and I liked the 9 grain because of its deeper flavor and more sour but the girls will like the lighter AZ bread the best.  Neither has ans seeds,nuts, fruits, scald or sprouts in them even though both are healthy options for sure.

Lucy reminds you to not forget the salad especially when it has home grown heirloom tomatoes. 

Formula

Pima Club and White Sonoran Boule

 

 

 

 

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD starter

5

0

0

5

1.08%

AP

5

10

15

30

7.50%

15% Extract Pima & Sonoran

5

10

15

30

7.50%

Water

10

20

30

60

15.00%

Total

25

40

60

125

31.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

62.5

15.63%

 

 

 

Water

62.5

15.63%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Pima Club

100

25.00%

 

 

 

AP

200

50.00%

 

 

 

White Sonoran

100

25.00%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

400

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.95%

 

 

 

Water

289

72.25%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

72.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

462.5

 

 

 

 

Water

351.5

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.00%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain  %

50.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

829

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.03%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.75%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

0.75%

 

 

 

Total

6

1.50%

 

 

 

 

85 Percent Extraction Multigrain Sourdough

 

 

 

 

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD starter

10

0

0

10

1.71%

85% Extraction Wheat

10

20

40

70

13.73%

Water

10

20

40

70

13.73%

Total

30

40

80

150

29.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

75

14.71%

 

 

 

Water

75

14.71%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.45%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

37

7.25%

 

 

 

85% Extracttion MG Mix

473

92.75%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

510

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.88%

 

 

 

Water

416

81.57%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

81.57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

585

 

 

 

 

Water

491

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

83.93%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain Equivalent %

7.35%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,115

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

80.10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

6

1.18%

 

 

 

White Malt

6

1.18%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

16

3.14%

 

 

 

Total

28

5.49%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

85% Etraction includes:: Buckwheat, Einkorn. barley, farro

 

 

 wheat, spelt, corn & oat - Plus the whole rye makes 9 grains

 

 

 

 

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