The Fresh Loaf

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davidg618's picture
davidg618

...after two months test-baking rye breads, some of whose recipe addled my brain, to just bake my familiar weekly sourdough.

This is essentially Vermont sourdough from Hamelman's Bread with 11 percent less levain, and 15 hours retard at 55°F.

David G

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

So this is my first Forkish recipe. Tried the Overnight Country Brown.

I did not wish to build a huge pre-ferment and discard so I built up just enough over two days for one loaf.

 

 

Forkish recommends to final proof seam side down and when baking in a dutch oven this will allow the seams to open up naturally with no scoring.

I did this one free standing so final proofed seam side up and scored before baking.

Will Forkish's way work if not baking in a dutch oven?

 

bmeilinger's picture
bmeilinger

This was sort of a last minute, random idea loaf that turned out really, really well!  Gotta love fermentation...

The formula:

Item

Weight

Percent

ASBF

600g

60%

GBC

320

32

Rye

80

8

Beet

160

16

Sprouted Rye

180

18

Water

750

75

Leaven

150

15

Salt

25

2.5

Used a small percent of whole grain rye flour for the flavour.  Added in grated, cooked beet and sprouted rye berries after autolyse.  Added water, too; probably another 100g or so, bringing hydration to around 85%.  This time I felt that the dough was perfectly hydrated, if a bit sticky.  Shaping was relatively easy and smooth.

The timeline:

Step

Planned Time

Actual Time

Preferment

N/A

8:30am

Mix

2:30

2:40pm

Autolyse

2:40

2:45

Final Mix

4:00

4:45

Bulk

4:30

5:00

Preshape

7:30

9:00

Bench Rest

7:40

9:20

Shape

8:15

9:50

Retard

8:30

10:00

Bake

7:00am

10:20am

Due to the lack of original plan, the leaven was just stater that I fed in the morning, something like 60/120/120 starter, flour, water.  Carried through a relatively long bulk rise, about 4 hours, with about 6 turns.  As usual, retarded around 40 degrees overnight.  Baked in the Lodge: 510 for 20 minutes, covered; 450 for 32 minutes, uncovered.  Dough stuck a bit to the cloth in the bowl, but both loaves retained their shape incredibly well and "stood up" in the cooker.  Great volume.  Was curious how the beet color would fare over the bake, as it "looked like a joke" in its raw state, according to my roommate.  I have to agree.  Fun bake for sure, glad I figured it out despite the last minute decision.

Here are some pictures:

Was incredibly pleased with the crumb of this one.  Pretty much exactly what I strive for: open but not too open, moist but not gummy, soft but sturdy.  Flavor was great, but not notably unique.  The beets and sprouted rye may have added a bit of flavor, but did more for the bread in terms of aesthetics.  I like the slight red-pink hue and flecks of deeper color.  

Happy baking,

Bradley,

IG/Twitter: @bmeilinger

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

Many loaves for friends this weekend! My most consuming experiments were with 1) loooooong room temperature autolyse, and 2) pate fermentee as all of the leaven in a loaf. Unfortunately, I don't have crumb pictures for all loaves. The plight of the gifted loaf. 

For this dark chocolate chunk levain, I did a 12-hour autolyse of only flour and water, added levain at 5% of the total weight, carried out a 12-hour room-temperature bulk fermentation, retarded for 12 more hours, shaped and proofed in the refrigerator for another 10 hours:

 

Much shorter autolyse for this olive and herb levain:

For these (my first-ever pointy/torpedo batards!) I mixed a full dough and then added a chunk of old dough about equal to 1/2 the weight of the flour in the recipe. In this case, that was 400 grams of old dough added to a recipe of 440 grams of flour, total. I have baked with pate fermentee 5-6 times now, and I've always been so, so happy with the speed of fermentation and the ultimate result. 

And I can't stop finding opportunities to practice various approaches to batard-shaping (and various batard styles). So...here's a very long walnut and golden raisin sourdough torpedo I baked for a friend this morning, also having used the long room temperature autolyse (in this case, 6 hours). She's always great about sending pictures of the crumb:

Batards have a certain mystique to them. Pate fermentee does too. Gotta keep exploring!

jimcornwall's picture
jimcornwall

 I follow want you are saying to do in bullet point number one. Lukewarm water is what temperature? After stirring in the TBS bread flour what temperature do we want to keep it at. 80 to 85 degrees? As you feed and build up your starter during the first 7 days are we discarding some of the starter as you go? About how may days before I will be able to bake using this starter Please forgive all the questions. I'm relatively new to baking and don't want to kill your starter culture.Its a memory of mine from Bayern.Sincerely,Jim 

Bröterich's picture
Bröterich

I tried this recipe yesterday which I found on the popular German site Pötzblog (http://www.ploetzblog.de/2014/08/02/leserwunsch-dunkles-bauernbrot-no-knead/),

essentially a sourdough wheat/rye mix. The author says it is one most of the most read recipes.

I made 2 loaves one in the dutch oven the other one a cloche. I was very pleasantly surprised.

My wife and I ate almost half of a loaf this morning for breakfast.

Tom.

Philip Gregory's picture
Philip Gregory

Okay you guys, I've done it! It wasn't even three weeks ago that Sourdough was a foreign idea to me. Thanks to everyone on the site for all kinds of lovely information, finally I'm turning out some happy, happy loaves.

My starter has since turned into three little guys. I feed "Bananas" (he smells like bananas) with whole wheat flour, another one (name to be determined) with rye and whole wheat, and "Pablo Le Mon" (he used to live in a Lemonade pitcher) I feed with whole wheat and white flour.

All is well, they produce nice country sourdough loaves together. 

Because I've been so fortunate, and the bread has been a smashing hit, I'm looking for ways to tinker and really start to get into the science of bakers percentage.

I'm am also interested to see what will happen come this spring because for now, I have a wonderfully (for dough) cold kitchen. The kitchen can sometime get below 60 F so it slows down the bread making process for me which is good. I don't do any refrigeration just day long fermentation in the cold kitchen.

jungnickel's picture
jungnickel

This is one of my first attempts to bake a decent baguette in my 120 € oven (+stone) with the cheapest flour I could get here in Amsterdam.

This is the formula:

- 1000 g flour
- 750 g water
- 7 g fresh yeast
- 20 g salt

The mixing process was inspired by Richard Bertinet and I gave it a couple of stretch and folds before I put it into the fridge after 1,5 h after mixing for 48 hours. Then after giving it some strength dividing, shaping, proofing for 30 minutes. I am quite satisfied. It is everything but perfect and my oven doesn't really support me but I am pretty happy about the crumb. Taste could be improven by different prefermentation or T65 flour but the idea was to keep it simple.


Furthermore a couple of things that kept me busy the last two days...

 

 

PY's picture
PY

one's got to resort to commercial yeast. This weekend's bake is a chocolate bread with pieces of valrhona bittersweet chocolates mixed into the dough. Oh and with some spelt flour...why not? Bake in a le creuset french oven

bmeilinger's picture
bmeilinger

And I thought the potato porridge was creamy.  

I got rolled oats from Lonesome Stone Milling (where I get my flour), and soaked them in water for about a day and a half, changing the water once.  After this brief fermentation, the oats started to smell just faintly sweet.  I cooked them at a simmer for about 20 minutes, seasoned with salt to taste, pulled them from the heat, and let them sit from the morning until adding them in after autolyse.  

The formula:

Item

Weight

Percent

ASBF

650g

65

GBC

350

35

Oat Porridge

400

35

Water

750

75

Leaven

150

15

Salt

25

2.5

Again, for clarity: ASBF is a local flour: Artisan Sifted Bread Flour (Lonesome Stone Milling, Madison, WI).  Similar to T85, or so I am told.  GBC is Giusto's Baker's Choice, a white flour with around 11% protein, from California.  Started with about 75% hydration, then added up to (guessing), around 90%.  The oat porridge was quite wet, and I may have added a touch more than the dough could truly handle at that point.  As a result, the dough was a bit too wet for my liking, but I managed to shape it to some degree and retard the dough in the refrigerator, just as I did for the potato porridge.  The timeline was almost identical to last time; the only exception was a much later morning bake. 

The timeline:

Step

Planned Time

Actual Time

Preferment

12:30pm

12:30pm

Mix

4:30

5:00

Autolyse

4:40

5:10

Final Mix

5:30

5:40

Bulk

6:00

6:10

Preshape

9:00

9:00

Bench Rest

9:15

9:15

Shape

9:45

9:45

Retard

10:00

10:00

Bake

7:00am

11:00am

Preferment is sourdough leaven/levain, mixed at about 100% hydration (sometimes a bit higher).  For this, I used about 40g of ripe starter to 120g each of ASBF and room-temperature water.  Retardation was done in refrigerator, right around 40 degrees Fahrenheit.  Bake was in Lodge combo cooker, 500 for ~20 minutes, sealed; 450 for ~34 minutes, opened.  Here is a picture of the crust, via IG.  The crumb was surprisingly tight, but ultra-creamy.  Actually tasted like cheese and butter, which was a revelation.  Excited that I have this porridge method in my arsenal!  

 

Happy baking,

Bradley,

IG/Twitter: @bmeilinger

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