The Fresh Loaf

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zachyahoo's picture
zachyahoo

Alright, so this is Hamelman's Country Bread (50% preferment).

To me these two loaves look really over shaped. The cross sections would be far rounder than I think is appropriate. Also, the scoring to me looks as if it needs to be far deeper (I was trying to get ears and boy this is far from that!).

Can you help me diagnose what went wrong here?

Oh, and the two loaves were unfortunately a little close to each other in the oven and ended up producing that unsightly growth where they bridged together. This was my first time trying to fit two loaves in the oven at the same time with my peel, and the unloading process didn't go completely smoothly.

 

Some input, please and thank you!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hamelman's 5-Grain Levain is always a delight with a crunchy crust and moist crumb full of seedy goodness. Highly recommended. Specifically, take the no-added-yeast/cold retard overnight option. It truly does make an enormous difference in flavor - for the better.

The exuberant oven spring and bloom is characteristic of this bread.

 

The Dried Fig-Toasted Hazelnut Levain is a bread I made during the San Francisco Baking Institute Artisan II (Sourdough baking) workshop. Well, that was a Raisin-Walnut bread, but every combination of a dried fruit and a toasted nut I have tried so far has made a delicious bread. Here's the formula and procedures:  

Total Formula

Baker's%

Wt. (g)

AP Flour (11.7% protein)

71.57

383

Whole Wheat Flour

19.77

106

Rye Flour (Medium rye)

8.66

46

Water

67.62

362

Yeast (Instant)

0.08

1

Hazelnuts (toasted, peeled & chopped)

15.81

85

Dried Calmyrna figs (diced and rinsed)

19.77

106

Salt

2.13

11

Total

205.41

1100

 

Firm Levain

Baker's%

Wt. (g)

AP Flour (11.7% protein)

95

77

Rye Flour (Medium rye)

5

4

Water

50

40

Active firm starter

60

48

Total

210

169

  1. Dissolve the firm starter in the water.

  2. Add the flours and mix and knead until there is no visible dry flour.

  3. Shape into a ball. Place in a clean bowl. Cover tightly.

  4. Allow to ferment overnight (12 hours at room temperature).

  5. Toast hazelnuts, at 300ºF Convection (or 325ºF bake) for 16 minutes. Allow to cool then peel and place in a jar or bowl and cover.

  

Final Dough

Wt. (g)

AP Flour (11.7% protein)

275

Whole Wheat Flour

106

Rye Flour (Medium rye)

42

Water

305

Yeast (Instant)

1

Hazelnuts (toasted)

85

Dried Calmyrna figs (diced)

106

Salt

11

Firm Levain

169

Total

1100

Procedures

  1. Pour the water into the bowl of a stand mixer.

  2. Add the flours and mix with the paddle attachment at slow speed until a shaggy mass is formed. The dough should be medium soft.

  3. Remove the paddle. Scrape the dough together. Cover the mixer bowl and let it rest for 20-60 minutes.

  4. Cut the hard stems off the dried figs. Cut the figs into medium dice (about the size of raisins). Place the diced figs in a fine sieve and run water over them, mixing them with your fingers and separating the pieces stuck together. Place the sieve over a bowl to drain until ready to mix the figs into the dough.

  5. Sprinkle the salt and the yeast over the dough. Add the firm levain in several pieces. Mix with the hook attachment at slow speed for 1 or 2 minutes, then increase the speed to Speed 2 and mix for 5-8 minutes. D.D.T. is 78-80ºF.

  6. When moderate gluten development has been achieved, scrape down the dough. Add the figs and nuts to the mixer bowl and mix with the hook at slow speed for 2 to 3 minutes.

  7. Transfer the dough to a floured board and knead it for a couple minutes to better distribute the nuts and figs. Then transfer it to a lightly oiled bowl and cover.

  8. Ferment for 2 hours at 76ºF with a stretch and fold at 60 minutes.

  9. Divide into two equal pieces and pre-shape as boules. Cover and let the gluten relax for 20-30 minutes.

  10. Shape as bâtards and place, seam-side up, in floured brotformen or onto a linen couche.

  11. Cover and proof for 90 to 120 minutes at 80ºF.

  12. Pre-heat oven to 500ºF with baking stone and steaming apparatus in place for 45-60 minutes before baking.

  13. Transfer loaves to a peel. Turn down oven to 460ºF. Score the loaves as desired. Steam the oven. Load the loaves onto the stone.

  14. After12 minutes, remove the steam source. If you have a convection oven, switch on the fan and reduce the temperature to 435ºF. Bake for 12-14 minutes more. The loaves are done when nicely browned, they sound hollow when thumped on the bottom and the internal temperature is over 205ºF.

  15. Optionally, leave the loaves on the baking stone with the oven turned off and the door ajar for another 8-10 minutes to further dry the crust.

  16. Transfer to a cooling rack and cool completely before slicing.

Happy baking!

David 

Skibum's picture
Skibum

I changed the hydration and because the starter had been refreshed two days prior, I used 60g rather than 50. The holes are just too darned big! It makes a decent sandwich loaf, but not quite what I was looking for. I searched some youtube videos and unlike Peter Reinhart, Ciril Hitz degasses his ciabattas and does not fold and his crumb structure is more even. I like the shape Peter's letter fold gives, but next bake of this loaf I will de-gas gently before folding to see if I can get a more uniform crumb structure.

One of the reasons I love to bake is that I learn something new just about every time I bake a loaf. I got great oven spring once again and the before and after photos follow:

Happy baking folks! Ski

STUinlouisa's picture
STUinlouisa

Last couple of times I made bread there was little gluten development despite using a combo of french folds and stretch and folds. The doughs just collapsed  into an unstructured mass of glop. I tried baking in pans which was my original intent anyway since I was trying to make pain de mie but had no spring and a gummy interior. The doughs were naturally leavened so I thought it might either be my starter or maybe the kitchen had become infected by those insidious strings that mini oven has had trouble with. I should also mention that the dough had some sprouted flour, about 25%, in them but I have  never had trouble with that amount before and trying the sprouted flour in the pain de mie was my reason for making this bread in the first place. There also were eggs in the dough since the hens are laying prodigiously this winter for some reason.

I decided to go back to the basics and make two boules each with only flour, water,and salt, one leavened with commercial yeast and the other with my starter. That way I could tell if the starter was still good and if the kitchen needed  to be decontaminated. They were made a day apart using roughly the same procedure. Luckily both turned out fairly well. The one on the right is the commercial yeast and had just a touch more loft than the naturally leavened one on the left. Both have a good flavor with the naturally leavened one better of course. These are half sized loaves based on 250g flour which was half AP and half white whole wheat at 70 plus% hydration and I think I misjudged the proof a bit in both cases, but at least I can look for other causes for my bricks.

In the background is some pasta made with a 50% combination of fresh ground durum and Kamut along with the aforementioned eggs drying on a homemade rack. It will be tossed in a sauce made with mussels and whatever else sounds good at the time and accompanied by some of the bread slathered with roasted garlic butter. A veritable carbohydrate fest on a snowy winter evening.  Maybe I'll throw in a little salad just to keep balanced.

Stu

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Well with ski season full on, I have been living on Norm's onion rolls, pulla and Floyd's blueberry, cream cheese braid variations for three months now. This ciabatta is the first plain, lean loaf I have baked in some time. Sometimes you just get a taste for things.

This loaf was baked using 350g strong bread flour @ 78% hydration and using 50g newly refreshed liquid levain, 7g salt and 1TBs EVOO. I used vigorous mixing in the bowl followed by four sets of S&F's with 10 minutes rest and after 2 hours of bulk rise, then gently shaped as described by Peter Reinhart in ABED.

Baked at 500 for 12 minutes with steam, turned and baked another 12 minutes. I wish I had a before and after picture as I didn't just get oven spring, I got oven explosion! I estimate 3 - 4 times oven rise from proofed. I will do a before picture next bake which is in progress @ 80% hydration.

Happy baking! Ski!

Ru007's picture
Ru007

Today was my first attempt at a rye loaf! I decided to start cautiously so I went with Peter Reinhart’s “Transitional rye sandwich loaf”. It definitely didn’t disappoint.

I wasn't sure what i was supposed to expect in terms of the crumb, i know that rye tends to yield fairly dense loaves, but this is a lot lighter than i thought, probably due to the fact that there is only about 41% rye flour.

I used whole rye flour as per the recipe, and wholegrain flour instead of the white flour called for in the recipe. I was surprised by the texture of the dough, I expected it to be almost like clay but it was much stretchier than I expected and became quite smooth after a few sets of stretch and fold. It didn’t feel like dough made with only wheat four but it was much easier to handle than I thought it would be.

 The flavour of this bread is great, I think even people who are not rye lovers will like it!

Here is the formula:

Wholegrain bread flour 49%

Whole rye flour 41%

White bread flour 10%

Buttermilk 35.3%

Water 35.3%

Honey 5%

Oil 3%

Salt 1.7%

Yeast 1.7%

I did have to increase the water slightly, so the hydration in the formula is a bit higher than the original recipe i found the biga to be quite dry (probably due to the use of whole grain flour instead of white) so i added an extra 28g (the original recipe called for 142g so i used 170g).

The loaf is fairly flat partially because the loaf pan I used was too big (my bad) but I didn’t really get any oven spring. Is that normal for rye bread?

 

 

zachyahoo's picture
zachyahoo

I think I'm finally getting the hang of the shallow scoring at a low angle. I love the gradient of light to dark I'm getting on the batard. And even some blistering from the several hours in the fridge..

This was using Hamelman's Country Bread recipe (with the 50% pre-ferment)

 

 

 

Reynard's picture
Reynard

This was one of the first sourdough recipes I tried when starting out last spring - and I failed royally with it, ending up with blown-out wonky loaves with flying crusts and a kitchen smeared in sticky dough. Admittedly I was a relative newcomer to baking bread and made every possible newbie mistake with it.

Wanting a change from the last few loaves of pain sur poolish, my baking supervisors - Poppy and Lexi - suggested I take the plunge and give this a whirl again. But this time, I've taken a lot of advice, lessons and feline displeasure on board.

I used 600g of flour, 400g of water, 200g of levain and 2% salt. The main differences from my previous attempts other than adding lard (5%) was 1) to add 40g (6.67%) of rolled porridge oats as opposed to reducing the water to take into account using UK flour and 2) baking the bread under a cloche - in this case, my trusty chicken brick, something I wasn't using back then.

Ingredients:

Levain:

50g rye starter @ 100% hydration

75g wholemeal bread flour

75g tepid water

Dough:

All of the levain plus the following...

100g whole rye flour

500g strong white bread flour

400g tepid water

40g porridge oats

12g salt

30g lard

Method:

Morning 1 - take starter out of the fridge, let it come to room temp and then feed. Leave it to double and begin to fall back.

Evening 1 - remove 50g of starter and use to build levain. Cover and leave for 12 hours. It should be nice and bubbly come the morning.

Morning 2 - build the dough. Mix flour, salt and oats together and rub in the lard. Make a well in the mix and add in the levain and most of the water. Bring together with fingers and begin to knead. Add rest of the water. Knead (I do this by hand in a large mixing bowl) for around 15 minutes until dough begins to resist. Cover bowl and leave to bulk ferment at room temperature - around 6 hours, give or take. Incorporate three sets of stretch & folds during this time.

Afternoon 2 - when dough has more or less doubled, turn out onto well-floured board, knock back and shape. At this point, put oven on to preheat to 230C. Place shaped dough seam side up into floured banneton, put in a plastic freezer bag and leave to proof to around 85%. At room temp (around 18C) this will take about an hour.

Turn out the dough into the chicken brick and score. Place lid on the brick, put into the oven and bake for 25 mins with the lid on. Remove the lid, lower the oven temperature to 200C and bake for a further 25 mins. Leave till cold before cutting - about 3 hours - but best left overnight.

Verdict:

A really nice-looking loaf of bread that sprung and bloomed well in the oven - a couple of minor cracks, but no blow outs or wonky bits. A major relief, that, after my previous calamities... Crust thin and crunchy with a good nutty flavour. Crumb a little more open than what I usually turn out, but unsurprising considering it's a higher hydration than what I normally work with. Not a bad thing, just a pleasant surprise. Crumb was also a little on the glossy side, springy, moist and a little chewy. Flavourwise it was mild and creamy with just a wee hint of sour. Overall, a does-it-all bread that's equally at home with sweet and savoury toppings, but it was especially good with pate and with homemade tandoori chicken. Even a little on the stale side it's still very nice - it just need to be sliced very thinly :-)

I think Poppy and Lexi were secretly impressed - or at least that's what I hope. Those two can be so inscrutable at times... The bread passed the PUT (Parental Unit Test) as well, resulting in a request for more of this kind of bread.

 

There's definitely room to play with in terms of the flour combinations etc. I've managed two consistent loaves with this particular combination, so for the bake that's in the oven as we speak I used all rye for the levain, and a mix of 400g white bread flour, 100g of whole rye flour and 100g of oat flour. Fingers crossed...

Was nice to take a break today and bake bread instead of sawing logs. There's not so much of that downed spruce left now, although I've discovered that the sawdust is hellaciously sticky... It sticks to me, the cats and just about everything it comes into contact with. On the other hand, it *does* smell nice LOL. We're heading for a bit of a cold snap here, so the girls have taken the best warm spots in the house - Poppy in front of the fire and Lexi in her favourite cardboard box next to the radiator in the hallway. Can't say I blame them really.

sonia101's picture
sonia101

 

I haven't had much time lately for baking so it was nice to spend a day in the kitchen. 

This is by far the best German Hefezopf I have baked and I have tried heaps of different recipes. This one is so light and fluffy and stayed fresh for days.  

Recipe can be found here 

http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/378801124204434/Friedas-genialer-Hefezopf.html

 

 photo IMG_1030.jpg

 

 

  

This cake is such a quick and easy recipe, a few ingredients into the mixer and bake the base for 10 minutes. Then fill with custard, fruit and a glaze.

Recipe can be found here

http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/150211066139377/Tortenboden.

 

  photo IMG_1007.jpg

 

No good baking session is complete without making Pretzels lol 

 

  photo c299c45b-e5b0-4037-b46c-1545778365e7.jpg

 

Cheers Sonia

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After getting Alan in trouble with his latest higher whole grain (25%) SJSD baguettes, Lucy felt terrible about it and when he shot back a challenge bread for her with a 7 Stater,  4 Sprouted Grain bread after last week’s 4 Starter, 7 Grain Bread. 

Lucy checked and sure enough she had an apple YW starter and another nearly dried up 36 week old Rye sour starter in the back of the fridge as well as the next rye sour starter we made that was supposed to fridge out for 8 weeks before being used.

Getting to the 4 whole grains is what turned out to be a struggle.  It took a bit of digging in her pantry but eventually Lucy came up with 17 whole grains for this boule.  Turns out that Lucy is a hoarder.  I saw some bulgar, kaniwa, amaranth and 5 other rice, so she could have done a 25 grainer.  Now Lucy is into her own challenge of 15 Grains and No More Than 30 Ingredients for the 3rd time.

There were few new things for this bake.  14 of the whole grains were both sprouted and ground into flour and ground into flour without sprouting at a 50/50 mix.  3 grains were held back to be made into a porridge; wild rice, flax and quinoa.

The 60 g dry weight of these 3 grains came out to about a total of ½ cup.  We simmered them on low for an hour before taking it off the heat, taking the lid off and letting the porridge dry out and cool.  It weighed 230 g when it went into the dough.  This wet mess took the overall hydration of the dough to 100% or so.

After half the 14 whole grains were sprouted, we milled them and the identical amount of the same whole grains and sifted out the 17% Extraction from each that we fed to the levain for the first (2)  four hour feedings.  The 3rd feeding was 50/50 sprouted and non sprouted 83% extraction 14 grain.  Once it doubled we retarded the levain for 12 hours.

While the levain warmed up the next morning we did a 2 hour autolyze of the dough flour, red and white malt and the dough liquid – in this case Shiner Bohemian Black lager.  We held back the salt and some of the beer to do a double hydration later.  Once the autolyze was done we mixed in the levain and let the dough sit for 30 minutes before finishing it off with the salt, held back beer and the first set of 60 slap and folds.

We did two sets of 30 slap and folds all on 30 minute intervals and 3 sets of stretch and folds on 30 minute intervals where the porridge was incorporated during the first set.  Once finished with the gluten development, we let the dough rest for 15 minutes before pre-shaping, shaping, placing it into a rice floured basket: bagging and placing it into the fridge for a 15 hour cold final proof.

It rose about 50% in the fridge so it needed some time on the counter to finish proofing to 85% before we slid it I to a 450 F oven and covered it with a a heavy aluminum pot to hold in the steam.  After 18 minutes we removed the cloche and turned the oven down to 425 F convection this time.  After another 22 minutes the bread was 207 F on the inside and deemed done.

We turned off the oven and let the bread remain on the stone with the oven door ajar to further dry put and crisp the crust.  It spread more than sprang and bloomed well under steam and also browned up nicely, with small blisters, once the steam was removed'  The crust came out fairly open for a 100% whole grain bread with a huge porridge add in.  The taste was good but this is one bread that isn't a rye one where a good dose of aromatic bread spices to perk it up some.  Maybe it is the boring rice porridge at fault..... that sort of flattened the taste a bit but nothing the wonderful aroma of some caraway, fennel, anise and coriander won't quickly fix.  It is an 8 that could be 10.

I'm getting into SD baking other than bread and this is a SD Ghiradelli chocolate chip inside and white choolate chip outside brownie 

Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

 

3 Rye Sour Starters 3-32 weeks retarded

9

0

0

9

2.15%

 

Witch Yeast

3

0

0

3

0.71%

 

Cooked Potato Starter

3

0

0

3

0.71%

 

Raw Potato Starter

3

0

0

3

0.71%

 

17% Extraction 14 Grain

20

0

10

30

7.06%

 

17% Extraction Sprouted 14 Grain

0

20

10

30

7.06%

 

Yeast Water

20

20

20

60

14.12%

 

Total

58

40

40

138

32.47%

 
       

Levain Totals

 

%

    

17% Ext.  Sprouted &14 Grain

69

16.24%

    

Water

69

16.24%

    

Levain Hydration

100.00%

     
       

Dough Flour

 

%

    

83% Extraction 14 Grain

175

41.18%

    

83 % Extraction Sprouted 14 Grain

175

41.18%

    

 

 

 

    

Salt

7

1.67%

    

Shiner Bohemian Black Lager

250

58.82%

    
       

Dough Hydration

71.43%

     

Total Flour w/ Starters

419

     

Total Water

319

     
       

Red Malt

3

0.71%

    

White Malt

3

0.71%

    

Wild Rice, Flax, Quinoa

60

14.12%

Dry Wt.

230 g Wet

 
       

Hydration with Starter

76.13%

     

Total Weight

861

     

% Sprouted 14  Grain

50.71%

     

% Whole and Sprouted 14 Grain

100%

     
       

Sprouted and whole 14 grain flours are equal amounts of: barley, spelt, Kamut, rye,

wheat, oat, millet, durum, corn, buckwheat, pima club, emmer, einkorn & sonoran white

       

Don't be fooled by the hydration.  This is a very wet and sticky dough due to the

water in the porridge.

      

 

If you are smoking brined, chicken leg meat you better have a rack of ribs on there too.

And a fresh garden salad to cut the smoke

 

 

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