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proth5's picture
proth5

…triticale croissants.

Who didn’t see this coming? Hands? Ah, well.

Triticale is my baking nemesis, my bête noir, and unfortunately my favorite grain. A cross between wheat and rye, it is very high in protein, but its gluten is of low quality. If you have ever heard a discussion about milling, you will hear that the protein content of wheat is higher as you get to the outside of the endosperm, but higher in ash and lower in quality. What does this really mean?

Well, if you’ve worked with triticale as much as I have, you know. In a 100% triticale mix, you will get some gluten formation (not like what you’d get in wheat) but it will not endure prolonged mixing (it will break down shortly after you think “It’s still pretty weak, I should mix a bit more.”) and certainly will not support lengthy fermentations and proofing. That is lower quality gluten.

But what I have found that if you use triticale at no more than 30 or 40% of the total flour in combination with a higher protein wheat flour, you can essentially treat the dough like a wheat dough. Anything more than that and you are working with something even more fragile than soft wheat.

The thing is triticale is delicious. And it was mentioned in Star Trek (the original series and DS9). So I keep baking with it.

Since I’m having fun with whole grain vienoisseries, I went for triticale croissants. I used the formula for hand mixed, hand laminated croissants from Advanced Bread and Pastry, and used freshly ground triticale for 30% of the total flour and a liquid levain of the wheat flour rather than the poolish.

The first time I tried this (well there’s a sure and certain indicator that perhaps success was not the result) I used my standard practice of putting the shaped croissants in the refrigerator for six hours or so, and then proofing and baking them. This proved too much for the delicate gluten, which puffed up nicely in the oven but gave out before the thing was fully baked. Delicious, but somewhat flat.

This time, I proofed and baked immediately after shaping. Got some nice shoulders and the lamination isn’t all bad, either. Here you go:

Triticale Croissants

They really are extra delicious and, of course have all the crispy qualities of their wheaty cousins. I know they are extra delicious because I can’t resist the smell and must eat them – with most white flour croissants, I can send them off to my fans without even a taste. Triticale is used primarily for animal feed. Yeah, those cows get all the good stuff…

Until the next cold front - Happy Laminating!

batiger1948's picture
batiger1948

I have a Bosch Universal Mixer (older 700W machine) and have just acquired the vintage Schnitzer Stone grain mill made in the '60s. I cannot find a pdf user manual. Does anyone know of a link or website that I may be able to find one? If not, if anyone has a pdf file for this user manual, would you mind sharing? All help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Well this loaf is similar in many respects to my lasted posted bake, with two changes: barley malt syrup instead of brown sugar and more of it by weight and one whole egg, beaten. 

Soaker

20g white wheat berries

20g red wheat berries

10g red flax

10g gold flax

10g quinoa

174g hot water

I soaked this 24 hours in a cool dark place, then added:

10g wheat bran

10g steel cut oats and left it to sprout for another day or 2

When the berries are sprouting I finish the mixing.

Milk scald

174g milk scalded

25g malt syrup

25g honey

When the milk scald has cooled to 100F add

300g whole wheat starter at 100% hydration and let get happy for a few minutes

Final dough

245g whole wheat flour

20g buckwheat flour

40g dark rye flour

80g bread flour

8g salt

28g oil

1 egg beaten

Mix well and let rest 10 minutes. Do four sets of stretch and fold with 10 minutes rest in between. On the last set of S&F's add

20g sesame seeds, toasted

30g sunflower seeds, toasted

15g wheat germ, toasted

Let rise until double in bulk, then punch down and shape for a loaf pan. Bake 40 minutes at 350F, turning at the half.

This one will be my daily bread and a weekly bake. I am not sure I can get up to dman's 15 grains and 30 ingredients though. We will see.

 

Enjoy and Happy baking folks! Brian

 

CrustandCrumb's picture
CrustandCrumb

As my 3.5 year old daughter would say, "deeeliciousss". Wonderful with cheese or just butter. We enjoy this bread for breakfast. Link to the recipe -

http://brotdoc.com/2013/05/26/musli-brot/

Enjoy baking!

Sid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I'm pretty sire you won't find this pie in New York City - at least not a good one or one made with this recipe.  Like pecan pie, this is a very old Southern recipe and no two are the same - the chocolate version is Lucy's favorite even though chocolate is poison for dogs.

Ok.Lucy cheated by putting in an extra pat of butter at the very end to float around, melt wherever and adding more buttery goodness.

Mine is an easy one packed with less sugar and more flavor than the usual.  Some don't have corn, some don't have lemons, most have much less corn and lemon and most have way more sugar.

Since we we got the mill we put hole grains in everything and grind things we normally wouldn't for a recipe.

The crust of this one has 1/3 cup of whole grain mix of spelt. rye and farro to go with 1 C of AP, 1/8th tsp salt, 1 T of sugar, 4 T each of butter and shortening with 6 T of Ice water - no vodka this time.  Cut the fat into the flour and salt and then add the ice water but stop at 5 T to see if it needs the 6th one,  Make a disk, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 45 minutes.  Roll it out into and right size for your pie pan and the refrigerate again while you make the filling,

4 T of butter and 1 C of sugar are creamed together and then 4 eggs are added and whisked until pale yellow.

1 tsp of vanilla, 1 can of condensed milk,  1 can of Media Creama, 3 T of yellow corn meal ( I ground whole popcorn), the zest and juice of 3 lemions.  Wisk away until well combined.  Put the fillng in the pie shell and place in a pre-heated 350 F oven ( I used the mini oven) for 20 minutes, rotate 90 degrees and bake another 20 minutes.  Rotate 90 degrees and bake 5 more minutes and then rotate one last time and bake 5 more minutes - 50 minutes total,  until the top souffles and rises an inch above the rim of the crust and lightly browns - amazing how high it puffs up..

 

Let cool and serve at room temp.   If you want Chocolate Chess Pie, then remove the lemon juice and zest and sub in  2-4 T of cocoa powder, Lucy  I uses over 3, to make it as chocolaty as you like.   

Skibum's picture
Skibum

I enjoyed the sprouted grains and seeds so much in my last multi grain loaf that I baked another one and a a third on the go. A week later this bread is still making great toast.

Soaker

20g white wheat berries

20g red wheat berries

10g red flax

10g gold flax

10g quinoa

174g hot water

I soaked this 24 hours in a cool dark place, then added:

10g wheat bran

10g steel cut oats and left it to sprout for another day or 2

When the berries are sprouting I finish the mixing.

Milk scald

174g milk scalded

25g brown sugar

25g honey

When the milk scald has cooled to 100F add

300g whole wheat starter at 100% hydration and let get happy for a few minutes

Final dough

245g whole wheat flour

20g buckwheat flour

40g dark rye flour

80g bread flour

8g salt

28g oil

1 egg beaten

Mix well and let rest 10 minutes. Do four sets of stretch and fold with 10 minutes rest in between. On the last set of S&F's add

20g sesame seeds, toasted

30g sunflower seeds, toasted

Let rise until double in bulk, then punch down and shape for a loaf pan. Bake 40 minutes at 350F, turning at the half. Enjoy and Happy baking folks! Brian

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Cheddar and Apple Sourdough, adapted from Paul Hollywood

I have enjoyed making a number of Paul Hollywood recipes, and this one is a favorite of my friends.  They aren't as fond of sourdough, so I had to do something different.  My sister likes this recipe, too, and she is not into bread or sourdough.  It's tough not to live cheddar, apples and sourdough together. I halved the recipe to make one loaf instead of two, as these loaves tend to be quite big. I’ve left the original recipe below, which will result in two loaves.

The dough, stuffed and ready for the oven.

Ingredients

750g strong white bread flour, plus extra for dusting

500g sourdough starter

15g salt

350-450ml tepid water

Olive oil for kneading

200g cheddar, grated, plus extra for sprinkling over the top

3 dessert apples, cored and roughly chopped

A bit out of sequence here, but look how yummy it looks inside when baked.

Method

Put the starter in a large bowl and mix in the water. Add the flour a little bit at a time and leave a bit extra for later.  When the dough is stiffer, fold in the salt.

When it gets too difficult to mix in the bowl, flour your surface and ease the dough out and knead it for 5- 10 minutes until the flour is incorporated and the dough is silky and smooth. Add the extra flour as you need it.  Now, put the dough  into a lightly oiled bowl and cover. Leave to rise in a warm place for about five hours or until doubled in size.  I put it in the oven with the light on.

Paul Hollywood’s recipe calls for two trays to be covered with cloths and dusted heavily with flour. I skipped this and just used a baking tray with parchment paper and lightly floured it.

Tip the risen dough onto a lightly floured surface, and fold it in on itself a few times to knock out all the air. Divide the dough into 2 pieces, and flatten each piece into a rectangle about 30x20cm and 1-2cm deep. Put the dough on the floured tray or cloth.

Sprinkle half the grated cheese over one side of the rectangle, and top with half of the apples, leaving a 1cm clear margin along the edges. Fold the dough over to make a smaller rectangle and press down the edges firmly to seal.

Put each loaf on a floured cloth (or the floured baking tray with parchment paper) and place inside a clean plastic bag.

Leave to proof at room temperature for 13 hours, or until the dough is doubled in size and springs back when lightly prodded with your finger. (I actually put it in the refrigerator for a few hours and then took it out right before I went to bed. This dough really does get very big; I am not sure you need the entire 13 hours. I’ve made it before, and it really does get big, so watch the dough rather than the clock!)

When the dough is ready, heat your oven to 200C (395F). Line two baking trays with baking paper if you have used floured cloths and transfer your loaves to the prepared baking trays.

Make an indentation in the middle of each loaf and sprinkle some more grated cheese over the surface of the loaves.

The final product went pretty fast.

Bake for 35 minutes, until the loaves sound hollow when tapped on the base.

Cool on a wire rack.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

This weekend was a busy one, but I still managed to bake my loaves in the dual combo cooker.

Because we were having a BBQ birthday celebration on Saturday, I had too many things to do and not enough room to do them, until the house cleared out.  Saturday night, I took my tablespoon full of starter and mixed it with 200 grams of freshly milled hard red winter wheat, and 200 grams of water.  The product started out looking like this:

By Sunday morning, it looked like this:

Which, from the bottom of the bowl, looks like this:

When my levain looks like this, I don't bother with the float test. I just take my scraper, cut it in half, add the water and mix the dough.

This time around, rather than using rice flour and white flour, I used coarsely ground wheat berries to sprinkle my baskets (still, I used a sifter to cover the basket) together with some rice flour.

Because I was leaving the house for the day and because my fridge was still full from the BBQ, I put the baskets in a large ice cooler (with yesterday's ice in it) and when I came back from my day out of the house, the dough had risen considerably. Perhaps it was over-proofed, I don't know.

One of the loaves bloomed nicely. The larger one did not...I think I may have deflated it a bit when I transferred it to the dutch oven since it wound up going over the side a bit.

In any case, here is the crumb of the smaller loaf which bloomed a bit higher than the larger loaf.  The bread came out awesome. I waited nearly two hours to cut it, and it was fantastic both with and without a buttery spread.

The following morning, I sliced it for a peanut butter sandwich for lunch, which was delicious.  The bread is wonderfully moist and full of flavor.  Alas, now it is in a ziplog bag. I don't know if it will ever be as delicious, but I remain willing to find out.

Next weekend, I plan to follow the Tartine Bread, Rye formula and see how that comes out.  Though, I intend to use fresh milled flour instead of AP flour.

jkandell's picture
jkandell

This experiment turned out so well I thought I'd share the formula. The levain uses only yeasts from fermented fig water. There is just a hint of fennel and caraway, with a gentle sweetness from honey. Typical of fruit yeast, there is a noticeable lack of acidity.  Nice moist crumb. Keeps well. Delicious!  

I used fruit yeast rather than sourdough or commercial yeast because with a bread this "pure", I didn't want any sourness or extraneous flavors to take away from the subtle flavors.

And there's something about using figs to leaven a fig bread.

(One may substitute raisin yeast water, I suppose, but the fig flavor infuses the dough.)

Formula

For one 1000g loaf.  Times are for summer baking in a hot house in Tucson AZ about 86F, so adjust accordingly.

  • To make the fig yeast water: Coarsely chop a dried, asiatic fig (the variety with tan skin with white powder on skin) and soak for about five days on counter in about 160g (?) of water. (You want to end up with 142g or so of fermented water after evaporation for the levain.) Once a day shake the bowl to aerate. The yeast water is ready when it has some bubbles, tastes a little vinegary, and maybe has a little white mold. Strain and throw away fig remains. 
  • Levain: Build over two elaborations at the indicated times and amounts, using white flour and the fig yeast water as the liquid. Do not add any other sourdough or yeast. After the fermentations It will look like a regular poolish. If you have a little left over use in main dough as part of the water.
  • Dough: Mix levain, fennel (or anise) seeds, and final ingredients except salt and figs. Add salt after 20m autolyse, and knead by a couple minutes of french folds. Add enough extra water (beyond the 56% hydration) to fully hydrate dough, as high as you like but not so much dough doesn't hold it's shape free-form. Stretch and folds at 1h, 1:30 and 2 hrs. Add 172g coarsely chopped dried figs (not counting the fig used for the yeast water) with stems removed (mission or asiatic variety) at the first fold on the first hour. This dough will be firm and solid but sticky because of rye, and shiny and slippery because of fermented water. 
  • Bulk ferment 3-4h. Proof 1.5-2.5h free form (if hydration less than 70%, other wise in banneton). 
  • Bake: 425F for 10m with steam, then another 30-50m at 350-375 until crust is dark brown. Or like your usual levain. The crust will be darker than usual, but do be careful not to actually burn.  (Bake at about 25F less than usual due to the figs and honey.)

If one despises whole grain, white bread flour could substitute for the 25% whole wheat to make a lighter loaf; but do leave the whole rye portion.

Of course you could easily add 15% nuts like hazelnuts, walnuts or pecans if you wanted another texture/flavor.

Please do let me know how it turns out!  Jonathan

Catomi's picture
Catomi

This was Take 2 of Tartine's Ode to Bourdin (white-wheat blend), and the first time that I tried using bolted flour (the previous loaves used bread flour in place of the bolted wheat flour). So this was actually 100% whole wheat, just with some if the bran sifted out and applied to the outside during proofing. 

The loaves looked fine coming out of the oven; perhaps a bit dark, one of them slid into the dutch oven crooked (but actually I might not be able to tell unless I knew), and the parchment paper stuck to the bottoms, which is annoying but easily fixed next time. However, when I cut into the first loaf I discovered a sizeable pocket right in the middle of the loaf. See below:

This is the loaf that went in crooked:

 

Whoops! Big 'ol pocket:

 

I was thinking that this was likely due to my not shaping it properly. Does that seem likely? Details are as follows:

I did an overnight autolyse, adding salt in the morning (probably should have added it at the beginning of the autolyse, but as with previous loaves I set my dough up and then went and read about the technique I was trying). Leaven passed the float test in 6 hours, so I mixed it in with the last 50 g of water and basically kneaded it into the autolyse. I did notice when I went to mix everything together that there was a little bit of liquid at the edges of the autolyse, making it look like the flour had lost some absorptive capacity - not sure if this was a product of me adding salt part way through autolyse, or something else. I was concerned about gluten breakdown, but to my non-expert eyes/hands the dough seemed just fine (stretched instead of tore).

I did a 3 hour bulk fermentation (room temp around 75 degrees F), shaped, bench rested for 30 min and did a final shaping. The loaves proofed in bran-dusted kitchen towel-lined glass bowls at room temp for 3 hours, then were baked in cast iron to 210 degrees F according to Robertson's directions. 

I'm still very much learning how to handle and shape dough, so I assume that I did something inappropriate during shaping to cause the pocket. (The second loaf remains unsliced as of yet, so no idea if it has a similar pocket.) Any ideas what that could be, and what I could do to avoid it in future? My husband reports that it tasted great with olive oil, but most of our bread goes to toast/sandwiches and that's more easily accomplished without giant holes. Also, it makes me wonder if my thermometer reading was accurate; would it be off if I accidentally stuck it through into the hole? I can't decide. I must need more coffee. 

Thanks!

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