The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

Phew. I've baked for a number of friends over the last few days! Many of them just wanted or needed a very generalized designation of "bread" for events, so I was able to experiment a bit with sourdough baking.

Disclaimer: All ciabatte described are "pre-dabrownman-flip-recommendation," so don't judge me too harshly...I still haven't acquired a second pastry scraper, so all ciabatta experiments are on a temporary hold...

Saturday, I baked some whole wheat ciabatte and a few small simple batards.

also, a small parmesan-encrusted boule, and a small sesame-encrusted batard.

 

Then on Sunday, a few more ciabatte -- this time with cream cheese and chive. 

 

And then just this morning, Monday, before work: A simple 80% hydration batard with 5% levain. Still working on my shaping. Still striving for those ears. 

Because my friend just emailed me saying that this was her favorite bread I've given her, I'll post a very basic formula:

Ingredients:

425 g AP flour

50 g whole wheat flour

375 g water 

5 g wheat germ

11 g salt

10 g sugar (in place of 5 g malt)

50 g 100% hydration white starter 

Steps:

1) Mix flour and water, and autolyse at room temperature for 6-12 hours. 

2) Incorporate all other ingredients using the pincer method. This should take about 4 minutes. You'll notice that because the dough was already so wet, incorporating that small amount of 100% hydration levain, salt, sugar, and wheat germ is a surprisingly smooth process. 

3) Stretch and fold vigorously every 30 minutes for 3 hours. The number of turns depends on how the dough feels! Anywhere from 1-4 turns (4-16 folds), each session, performing the turns until the whole mass of dough wants to lift from the container.  

4) Rest on the counter for 8-12 hours, until dough has increased 80% - 100%, but no more.

5) Retard for 2-24 hours.

6) Sprinkle flour over the top of the dough in the container, and allow the flour to coat the edges as you gently release it. Pour onto a floured surface and rest for 10 minutes.

7) Shape and place seam-side up in a a brotform of some kind, cover with plastic, and proof at room temperature for 1.5 hours. 

8) Place  the brotform in the freezer for 15 minutes (I really like this freezer trick for high-hydration doughs proofed at room temperature...I genuinely think it helps with ovenspring!).

9) Score and bake at 460 for 20 minutes with steam, 25 minutes without.

The recipient has confirmed the appropriateness of the loaf for egg-dipping. 

More soon!

--Hannah

greenbriel's picture
greenbriel

I apologize, these posts must be getting pretty boring, but if I can't document my baguette obsession here, I don't know where else to turn. :)

Today's are 40% w/w straight same-day dough (my starter is being a bit ornery).

I think shaping and scoring is better than yesterday's batch, the one on the left I'm almost happy with. Ears! Crumb is obviously not as good looking, but I assume that's the wholewheat flour. Crust was better than usual because I followed advice (found on TFL, I think) to leave the loaves to cool in the oven with the door open for a while after baking. Worked great. They taste good!

Cheers, happy baking!

-Gabe

 

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Last week's 10% Einkorn, 40% Hard White Wheat was deliciously encouraging.  Egged on by Josh, I wanted to explore this mix more by "pushing" both the Einkorn and the overall wholegrain level this week.  I also wanted to add a sharper accent with some red wheat.  Easy as 1-2-3:  10% Hard Red Wheat, 20% Einkorn and 30% Hard White Wheat.  I also upped the overall hydration to 84% (again, taking a page from Josh's nice post), to accommodate the increased wholegrain proportion.  But maybe too much: Einkorn doesn't absorb water the way more branny wheat does (as noted by Mini this week) and this bread benefited from a day in the basket swaddled in Bee's Wrap.

The einkorn flavor comes through rather more assertively here than at 10% last week, despite the presence of some Hard Red Wheat in this formula.  This makes for a very pleasing balance of these grains, certainly no unpleasant bitterness from the einkorn.  I may try 20%-20%-20% next time, as that was in the running for this bake -- to give the mild einkorn and white wheat more of a run for their money by increasing the hard red, and dropping the hydration down a tick or two.

Process is exactly the same as last week's 10%/40%, with formula modifications as noted above.

Happy baking,

Tom

ironmanchef's picture
ironmanchef

there was a bread on the homepage a week or two go that had a beautiful loaf made with yeast and oatmeal. I bookmarked it but somehow it got lost. Can anyone provide a link?

thanks in advance

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

My father and my next door neighbor have both confirmed that Field Blend No.2 from Ken Forkish's Flour Water Salt Yeast is the best bread they've ever eaten.  I happen to enjoy it a lot.  To date, it has consistently produced the best tasting loaf for me.

The four loaves pictured were proofed overnight in two different fridges.  The front/expanded loaves were proofed and baked straight out of the main fridge.  The rear/undersized loaves were proofed in a 4.3 cubic foot fridge and taken out and left on the counter while the first loaves were baking (they seemed to be under proofed when I checked on them, so I wanted to let them warm up a bit).  I need to check the small fridge temperature, which we just started using.

The crumb on one of the smaller loaves looks like this:

As usual, there is peanut butter here because it is my lunch I am eating. It is a mixed levain and yeasted dough. I don't particularly enjoy having to add yeast and understand that I can probably omit the yeast and proof overnight on the counter instead of the fridge, and one day I will try this and report back. 

The reason I prefer this bread to the overnight country brown from the same book is because I find that making that bread, the way I do it, produces a loaf that is more sour than I enjoy. That is not to say that this would be the case if someone else were making the loaves.  I do not (for either loaf) usually use starter that was last fed 24 hours ago to build the levain. Instead, it is usually more like week old starter, fed 12 hours before, used to build my levain.  It just turns out that when I make the overnight country brown this way, it comes out more sour than I like. But when I make the field blend no. 2 this way, it comes out tasting really mellow.

greenbriel's picture
greenbriel

Certainly understanding why folks get obsessed with the chase for baguette perfection. I think the last round were better shaped, these had better positioning of slashes (more parallel with the loaf than before), but I need to work on consistent depth of cuts. 

Taste was better as this was an overnight dough, and I'm quite happy with the crumb. Hoping to try a levain batch soon, but my starter seems to be losing vigor :( Might have to try the pineapple juice if I need to start again.

isand66's picture
isand66

    This was supposed to be a Sprouted Durum loaf but I have not had time to do any sprouting lately.  I pulled out my mill and in went the durum berries and out came fresh Durum flour.  My mill does have its limitation so I have not been doing any sifting therefore the flour in this case was not as fine as store bought.

I decided to add some barley flour to try and get a little more nutty flavor and some egg yolks and butter to soften the crumb a bit.

The final bread was a little dry for my tastes but still tasted great.  Next time I would definitely up the water content to over 80% which would open up the crumb more and improve the overall bread.

MAIN

Formula

Fresh Milled Durum Barley Egg Bread  (%)

Fresh Milled Durum Barley Egg Bread  (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

Closeup1

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), egg yolks and softened butter and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.  I added some sesame seeds to the bottom of the basket before I put the dough in works well for adhering the seeds.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb

 

isand66's picture
isand66

 I have not had much time to post lately since I returned to work full time a two months ago, so this one is from a couple of weeks ago.

I wanted to make a hearty loaf and I decided to use some of the Angry Orchard Hard Cider I had on hand.  Normally I would create a soaker with the grains but this particular mix from KAF is fine to just add to the main dough ingredients as is.  The Harvest Grain mix contains whole oat berries, millet, rye flakes, sesame seeds, and sunflower seeds.

The end result of this particular mix of whole grains and flours was a nice tasty loaf with a moderately open crumb and a nice thick crust perfect for a cold winter night.

Closeup1

Formula

Multi-Grain Cider Bread (%)

Multi-Grain Cider Bread (weights)

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

closeup3

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, Harvest Grain blend and Hard Cider together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and walnut oil, and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Closeup2

Crumb


 

Truth Serum's picture
Truth Serum

A friend had never used the dough hook on his kitchenaid and wanted to try making bread. So the night before we made a poolish for him, and we spent the day creating two simple loaves.

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