The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Blogs

  • Pin It
rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

Hi TFL folks.

Long time, no post, but I couldn't let an Easter pass without my customary hot cross bun report. First, some eye candy (healthier to indulge via the eyes than scoff these fat-and-calorie bombs, especially if, like me, you allow yourself the indulgence of  slathering on the butter - it's fortunate Easter comes but once per year).

 

 

As always, made a swag of 'em, and as always these included SD and yeasted versions (those pictured are today's yeasted batch). As per last year, the yeasted were superior to the SD. I've reached the stage where I don't think I can better these babies - they are the best I've tasted and the result of years of experimentation, and tweaks upon tweaks. That said, some batches are inevitably better than others, despite the recipe and baking conditions being more or less identical. That's bakin'!

Obsessives and masochists can check out my previous posts on my HCB Quest as follows:

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/38242/hot-cross-buns-2014

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/keyword/sourdough-vs-yeasted-hot-cross-buns

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/28161/years-hot-cross-buns-one-lot-sd-one-yeasted

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32908/sd-vs-yeasted-hot-cross-buns-last-new-winnerand-its-veganfriendly

 

Cheers all, and hope you've enjoyed a safe and pleasant break.
Ross

alfanso's picture
alfanso

 Why yes, I am.  But this time, I had to tear myself away from my standard Baguette Crusade.  My wife wanted me to try making a batard out of the same dough so that she could slice pieces large enough to ensure that the bread would serve as more than just a bite-sized snack.  And I had just enough left over for a skinny cross-hatched baguette.

The batard shaping was suspiciously simple, considering that I haven't shaped one since, oh, 2007, just prior to my self imposed 6+ year hiatus from baking.  Proofed on a couche instead of a banneton, and dusted with raw flour before proofing, for that "rustic" look.  The raw flour jazz is something that I rarely do.  But in the spirit of trying to reproduce a bread close to my model R-P WW Levain, dust them I did.  That model is also baked dark, and I believe that I succeeded at doing so here.

alan

WendySusan's picture
WendySusan

Applying what I learned when I went back to basics, I mixed up a total levain based sourdough.  Of course during the rising period I had my doubts and although I have a multitude of patience being married to Mr. A.D.D., I get impatient watching the dough rise!  

I had started with a very small build in the morning of 10 gr each rye and bread flour, 4 gr whole wheat and 20 gr. water.  That night I mixed with 100 gr each of my wheat sour, rye sour, WW flour and water and let it ferment and boy did it do well overnight.  Of course this made twice what I needed for the final dough but about that later.

Next morning I mixed up 200 gr of the levain with 800 gr bread flour, 150 gr rye, 50 gr whole wheat and 700 gr water folds every 30 minutes for the first two hours and then left it all day in the microwave reheating my glass of water every few hours to keep the inside nice and warm.  I'm still learning the % method and this of course contains more than the 100% with the levain but that's ok....I'm getting it.

That night (actually last night), it had slowly doubled in volume and I dumped it out and started gently shaping.  The dough was really wet and I wasn't sure I was doing it right but I let it bench rest and then shaped it again...still really wobbly and jello like...I really had my doubts this was going to work.  Put the shaped pieces into floured bannetons...and I mean really heavily floured.   I got rice flour and mixed it with bread flour...I don't know about you...but my kitchen has a permanent light dusting of flour over everything these days!

Put the baskets in the fridge in plastic bags last night and hoped for the best.  They really didn't look that much bigger this morning but reacted nicely to a poke.  Dumped them in my preheated dutch ovens and lo and behoild, I have some nice looking loaves.....signature t-Rex slash included.

Last night, affter I had stashed these loaves in the fridge, I still had the other half of the levain left over and trying to be frugal...besides hubby wouldn't let me toss it....I decided to try another "formula."  


This time I pulled out my bag of KA Harvest Grains mixed in 100 gr of that with my levain and water mixture let it sit for a few minutes and then along with the various flours ( I won't bore you with the details but I did calculate all of the ingredients this time...hopefully correctly....and to assure I would have success, added 3gr. of yeast.  And success it was...I had to stay up to midnight last night baking it and hubby just had to have a piece before going to bed but I ended up with 2 nice loaves...one I forgot to slash but it didn't burst and is nicely rounded.

 So the point of this post is the say...yup...I think I'm getting it....oh and....anyone need a loaf of bread!!! LOL!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And if you've read this far, I just want to say a few more things....equipment....its a slippery slope and I keep adding to my arsenal.  We joined Restaurant Depot and I have to say....wow....what a difference in price!  Luckily I have an upright freezer to store my extra flour.  I got bowl scrapers and these cute little 1 liter plastic containers for holding my sours.  Rodney Rye on the left is extremely vigorous...he was at the half line yesterday.

 

I've been complaining to the hubby about my minor burns and the need for a pair of oven gloves.  What sweetheart...he went to Home Depot yesterday and found me a pair of welding gloves!!!  

 

Thanks for reading!

Wendy

 

PY's picture
PY

very happy with the oven spring

formula:-

70% bread flour

30% freshly milled wholewheat flour

1.8% salt

30% starter (over 3 builds)

60% hydration

dried longan rehydrated with hot water, liquid from rehydration then used to make up 60% hydration as per above

mix everything save for the salt until a shaggy mess

autolyse 30 mins

add salt, knead for 5 mins rest 5 mins knead another 5 mins

bulk ferment 2.5 hours with 3 folds at 45 mins interval. I added the rehydrated longans at my last fold

pre shape and bench 10 mins

shape and place in banneton

proofed for 1 hour (temp 29C)

baked at 220C for 13 mins with steam and 200C without steam for 30 mins

cant wait to taste! 

 

And some sourdough chorizo pizzas

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

If it’s Good Friday then this is Hot Cross Bun Bake Day.   This year we did a sprouted grain, poolish version after the YW and SD versions the past 2 years.  This one really proofed well and then sprang great in the oven.

 

We finished it off with the GMA’s lemon glaze just like always.  The poolish was made with all the15% extraction sifted out hard bits from the sprouted whole grain rye, spelt and wheat before using the 85% extraction for the rest of the levain.  20 g of the levain was pinched off for the white crosses that were made separately.

 

We did our usual 3 sets of slap and folds and 3 sets of stretch and folds – all 20 minutes apart where the snockered fruit, ,lemon and orange peel were added on the first set of stretch and folds.  The pre-fermented flour was 28% and the sprouted four was

 

After an hour of bulk ferment the dough was divided into 9 balls placed in 8x8 Pyrex baking pan and covered with the crosses.  After a 2 hour proof the egg glaze went on and the pan was placed on the stone in a preheated 375 F oven.

 

The pan was rotated every 15 minutes for 30 minutes hen the oven was turned down to 325 F - convection.  The finished internal temperature was 190 F.  We glazed the op pf the buns with a lemon juice and powdered sugar glaze twice once it came out of the oven.

 

Will have to wait for these to cool down before we can get a peak at the inside and see how they taste.  These buns are fluffy, soft and moist with a sweetness from the fruits and sugar  Love the lemon glaze and when toasted with butter and marmalade  - one fine breakfast read.  For not being SD, this sure is tasty.

Happy Passover and Easter to all!

 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Pinch of Instant Yeast

0

0

0

0

0.00%

Sprouted 3 Grain Multigrain

10

30

60

100

27.78%

Water

10

30

60

100

27.78%

Total

20

60

120

200

55.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Sprouted 3 Grain Multigrain

100

27.78%

 

 

 

Water

100

27.78%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

27.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

LaFama AP

250

69.44%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

250

69.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

2.00%

 

 

 

Milk

150

41.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

60.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

350

 

 

 

 

Water 100, Milk 150

250

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

71.43%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

925

 

 

 

 

% Whole Sprouted Grain

30.56%

 

 

 

 

Cranberries, Raisins and Apricot

100

27.78%

 

 

 

Sugar

40

11.11%

 

 

 

Butter

40

11.11%

 

 

 

Red and White Malt

10

2.78%

 

 

 

Egg (1 large)

56

15.56%

 

 

 

Total Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

82.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crosses are 20 g of poolish, 75 g water, 100 G AP,  2 g salt and 5 g sugar.

 

not included in above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 grain sprouted flour is equal amounts of wheat, rye and spelt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The dough has 1/2 tsp each of cinnamon and nutmeg with

 

 

 

1/4 tsp each od allspice and ginger and 1/8 tsp of cloves.

 

The dried fruits were re-hydrated in brandy and bourbon

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy was going to do something else but came back to one of my favorites – Mediterra’s Pecan and Cranberry Sourdough.  This great bakery, located in the small AZ town of Coolidge, AZ, supplies the local Whole Foods with some of their upscale breads – including this one.  Here is there web site http://mediterrabakehouse.com/

 

I think Lucy has improved this bread in the past by increasing the whole grains and adding the whole spelt to the rye and whole wheat mix.  Now she made the whole grains spouted, home dried, freshly milled and added the red and white malts too.

 

The hard bits sifted from the sprouted whole grains were fed to the starter in the first and 2nd feeding to get them wettest the longest and then the remaining extraction as used in the levain and dough flour to make the whole grains come out to 35% and the levain to almost 16 %

 

The levain was very active since the kitchen has warmed up to 86 F already!  The 2nd stage doubled in 3 hours and the 3rd stage doubled in 2 and we had already cut the first stage to 2 hours for 7 hours total – super fast even though this retarded starter had been in the fridge for only 2 weeks and it had 10% KA bread flour in it instead of a complete whole rye.  We then retarded the built levain for 24 hours

 

We did a 1 hour autolyse with the malts, dough flour and water, no baked scald this time, as the levain warmed up on the counter.  Once the levain hit the mix, we did 3 sets o0f slap and folds of  8, 1, 1 minute to get the gluten developed and 3 sets of stretch and folds to get the pecans and cranberries distributed evenly. All were done on 20 minute intervals.

 

We let the dough bulk ferment for 1 hour on the counter before pre-shaping and shaping of the dough fat batard style and placing it in our long lined batard basket seam side up . The Mediterra shape for this bread is a squat torpedo, slashed twice and baked seam side down.  Ours is a much bigger batard so we slashed it 3 times

 

Like gargantuan, squat is a word not used enough for some reason.  None the less we bagged the rice flour, basketed dough and chucked it in the fridge for 14 hours of final proofing.   It looked like it might have over proofed in the fridge so we baked it straight out of the cold on the bottom stone using Mega Steam at 450 F for 15 minutes.

 

Once the steam came out we turned the oven down to 425 F - convection this time and continued to bake until the internal temperature was 208 F when we tuned the oven off leaving the bread n the stone door closed until it read 210 F.

 

It sprang, bloomed, blistered and browned well enough.  Not a bad looking loaf on the outside overall.  We will have to wait on the inside.  The crumb came out fairly airy and nicely moist and soft.  This bread has the slightly sweet taste of the cranberries and the pecans really come through.  Still this bread's fine flavor is mainly due to the sprouted whole grains and the red malt.  We just love the crust.  It went soft and chewy as it cooled but the toast with butter is exceptional - mu wife says it is the best toast she has had in a while.  Another fine bread that Lucy has mainly stolen and added too.Now we are waiting for the Good Friday tradition Poolish Hot Cross Buns to finish proofing, 

 

SD Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

2 Week Retarded Rye Sour Starter

10

0

0

10

2.16%

15.5% % Extraction Sprouted 3 Grain

10

10

0

20

4.24%

84.5% Extraction Sprouted 3 Grain

0

10

40

50

10.59%

Water

10

20

40

70

14.83%

Total

30

40

80

150

31.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

15.5% % Extraction Sprouted 3 Grain

75

15.89%

 

 

 

Water

75

15.89%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour

15.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

84.5% Extraction Sprouted 3 Grain

62

13.14%

 

 

 

Ka Bread Flour & LaFama AP 50/50

325

68.86%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

387

81.99%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

2.16%

 

 

 

Water

264

55.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

68.22%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

462

 

 

 

 

Water

339

71.82%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

73.38%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,075

 

 

 

 

% Whole Sprouted Grain

35.38%

 

 

 

 

Pecans

72

15.25%

 

 

 

Cranberries

72

15.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 g each of red and white malt were mixed with 25 g of water and added to the autolyse

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 grain sprouted flour is equal amounts of wheat, rye and spelt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with baked scald is

77.12%

 

 

 

 

 

WendySusan's picture
WendySusan

After my less than spectacular Forkish Country Brown....good flavor, not as good oven spring as I would like, I was advised by my mentor (you know who you are) to go back to basics.

I made the basic recipe out of the Tartine book but to assure success I added 3 gr of yeast to the dough.  Left on the counter for an overnight fermentation, shaped and refrigerated in the morning for an afternoon bake.  Pretty happy with the way they came out.  One boule stuck to the banneton and looked like a disaster when I covered it in the DO and one my husband missed the mark and went in crooked.  To my surprise they both recovered to make pretty nice loaves although I definitely need to practice my slashing technique.

I'm taking them to an event tonight so no crumb pix.  

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Hamelman's 5-grain Levain is one of our favorite breads.  My wife and I always have some on hand in the freezer (it freezes quite well), ready to toast a slice for breakfast or for a sandwich.  It also lends itself to all kinds of variations since it is easy to modify the ingredients and relative amounts of the soaker.  I have used cracked rye (as called for in the original recipe) and have also had success with bulghur wheat.  This time, inspired by this post earlier this year, I tried it with freekeh, something I just recently discovered.  Freekeh is green durum wheat that is lightly smoked, so I was hoping to impart that smokey flavor to the bread.  Another variation this time was when making the levain, I doubled the amount of the seed starter, shortening the fermentation time to reduce the acid formation and yield an overall sweeter bread.  The two loaves were retarded in the refrigerator overnight and baked after resting at room temperature for an hour or so.

The bread is really delicious, although the smokiness is not as pronounced as I had hoped.  The sweetness nicely complements the dark caramel of the crust.  I will make this again and probably increase the amount of freekeh in the soaker for a more smokey character.

-Brad

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs