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ExperimentalBaker's picture
ExperimentalBaker

 

After watching British Bake Off on cable, have to try it.

Added herbs infused olive oil instead of normal olive oil.

xena's picture
xena

It is my first and maybe the only post at least in the near feature. This is the only bread I`ve been work on for about 3 years, since the birth of my ferment. Enjoy!

295g flour (Hard wheat) 
90g rye flour
270-290g of water
200g white ferment (75% Hydration)
11 salt
75g walnuts

Place all the ingredients (except salt and walnuts) in the bowl and knead with a dough hook. Make sure the dough is soft and sticky but not to much. Correct with flour or water only in the next three minutes of kneading. Start with 270 grams of water and correct accordingly. Continue to knead for about 3 minutes more. Autolyse for 30 minutes. Knead again three minutes, add salt and knead another 7 minutes at slightly higher speed till the dough manages to escape from the walls.

It is very important the dough reaches a state which is flexible and detached from the walls of the mixing bowl (although it is sticky). If it sticks to the sides like a paste, the bread will not rise properly in the final stage. The state of the ferment probably matters here. I always use a "fresh" ferment (refreshed about 2-4 days before) with nice developed bubbles, and is not reached to its honeycomb stage.

After 7 minutes of kneading, add 100g chopped walnuts and mix them slightly. Rest the dough for an hour and a half, and then fold the dough in all directions. Repeat the stage once more. Put it in a bowl covered with plastic, and refrigerate it 10-12 hours for the night. In the morning get it out of the fridge. Divided it into rounds of 900g. Fold them on floured surface and let it rest and warm for an hour. Shape each piece into a loaf and place them on parchment paper (no Bannetons needed!). Let them rise for about 3-4 hours until the dough is springy and jiggly to touch.

When you see the dough is in the right direction, turn on the stove (250 C) with a baking stone. Heat it for at least one hour.

When the dough is ready, squirt water on it and sprinkle whole spelt flour. Score the bread in an angle, throw half a cup of water on a hot pan below the stone. Gently slide the dough on a stone, and squirt more water into the oven. Bake for 17-18 minutes (250 C), then turn the bread upside down and bake for 7-10 minutes more (also 250 C). The bread is ready when a hollow sound comes out when knocking at the bottom of it.  

Place the bread on a cooling grid to cool down completely before slicing. I slice it and freeze it sliced. 

Here are some pics:

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After last Friday’s bake found here: Götz von Berlichingen Ancient Age Sourdough Bread  our research on Götz of the Iron Fist turned up all kinds of interesting factoids.  After downloading our new Swami Swabi app for the iPhone, Lucy was able to channel many other famous Swabians and ask them what Swabien bread they enjoyed the most when they were alive - really amazing technology.

 

At 50% of the total flour and water in the dough, the levain is much darker than the dough flour.

First off, Götz isn’t the only famous Swabian out there but, not surprisingly, he liked Bavarian Missing Limb Sourdough the best.  This is a not so famous Swabian bread that is slashed very deeply, but only on one end and it is this the burnt end tat falls off while baking.   You might have heard of some of the other famous, Swabians Lucy talked to.  I know I was taken a back with her list even though it contained no women for some reason other than Lucy has no time for other women and prefers men with Von in their names.

 

Albert Einsteain, Leopold Motzart, Robert Bosch, Gottlieb Daimler, Roudoloh Diesel, Earnst Heinkel, Johanner Kepler, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Erwin Rommel and Erich Hartmann the highest-scoring ace of WWII with 352 air victories …along with three other notables – Claus Von Sauffenberg and Friedrich Gustav Jaeger - both German Army Officers tied to the assination attempt of Hiter in 1944 and Georg Elser who tried to assisnate Hiter in 1939 are just a fewof the famous men that Lucy talked to for a very long time….. I’m glad I don’t have to pay her phone bill tied to that app.

 

Lucy reports that most of them liked the usual SD Swabian breads like: Swabian Rye and Wheat Sourdough - Graubrot, or Schwabisches Weizenmischbrot which are still two of the most popular breads in Germany.  Sadly, these breads have commercial yeast kicker as a separate poolish for some reason.  I suppose the bakers just don’t trust their SD levain enough to raise the dough on its own?  We don’t have that problem here.

 

After hearing about most of these breads, Lucy was most impressed with Einstein’s interpretation of his favorite Swabian Potato Bread (Schwäbisches Kartoffelbrot) that his mother would make for him - to keep his mind sharp.  We love potatoes in bread too and anything that might help our brain is welcome.  This bread had some whole grain altus, a little rye and mostly white flour with a separate commercial yeast polish to help out the SD levain.  Lucy took one look at it and said she could come up with something a little more to our liking and way better than anything Einstein’s mother ever gave him to bite into.  She finds it amazing that Einstein could think at all eating that bread.

 

After abruptly hanging up on Einstein, Lucy started working on her formula.   She ditched the commercial yeast replacing it with a yeast water levain that was combined with the SD levain to make 1 huge Mega Combo Levain that equaled the hydration and the flour amounts of the 2 separate ones.

 

A Swabian Breakfast with somesmoked Swabian pork shoulder.

 

She used the 15% extraction from the whole wheat and whole rye milling to feed the levain and some of the 85% extracted wheat to go along with the AP flour.  She also chucked the Götz von Berlichingen altus in the levain too and used the potato boiling water for the liquid in the levain and dough.

 

This got all the hard and whole bits in the one build combo levain and it was left on the counter overnight so it could double in 9 hours.  We stirred it down and it doubled again in 3 hours and was ready to go.  We mixed everything else up with the levain and let it sit for 30 minutes before doing 3 sets of slap and folds of 8,1,1 minutes - 20 minutes apart.

 

We then did 2 sets of stretch and folds on 20 minute intervals before doing a pre-shape and final shape of the dough into a boule.  It was then placed in a rice floured basket and retarded for 12 hours.  We allowed the dough to warm up for 2 hours to get to 92.27% proof before firing up the mini oven to 500 F and getting 2 of Sylvia’s steaming cups boiling in the microwave

 

We tipped put the bread onto the top of the mini’s vented broiler pan that was covered in parchment, the steaming cups were placed catty corner and the whole assembly loaded into the Mini oven for 15 minutes of steaming.  After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 450 F.

 

Crab cake and fgrilled salmon  and  smoked rib tamale dinner.

Once the steam came out, we turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time. 15 minutes later the bread was 205 F on the inside and removed to the cooling crack.  It has bloomed a little, sprang well enough and browned that dark color showing it was boldly baked.  The crust was also very crisp.

 

Blueberry, strawberry and apricot galette makes for a afine dessert anytime.

.Once it was cool we wrapped it in plastic and let it sit on the counter overnight for 8 hours.  The crust softened as it rested.   The crumb was open soft and moist.  The crust was especially tasty and the bread was lightly sour with the yeast water muting the sour as it always does.

 

Lucy says..... don't forget to channel her salads.

This is fine tasting bread and no wonder Einstein loved his mother’s less healthy and tasty version.  Just think what he could have done with his mind if he had access to Lucy’s Schwäbisches Kartoffelbrot.  He might have been able to become telepathic, or even better, teleport himself into the future.  At least we can still talk to him any time we want with our new Swami Swabi iPhone app.

 

Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Total

%

Rye, Spelt & WW SD Starter

8

8

4.00%

Götz von Berlichingen Altus

50

50

25.00%

85% Extraction Rye & Wheat

40

40

20.00%

15% Extraction Rye & Wheat

35

35

17.50%

AP

75

75

37.50%

Yeast Water

53

53

26.50%

Potato Water

150

150

75.00%

Total

411

411

205.50%

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

Flour

204

102.00%

 

Potato Water

207

103.50%

 

Starter Hydration

101.47%

 

 

Levain % of Total

53.45%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

85% Extraction Rye

50

25.00%

 

AP

150

75.00%

 

Total Dough Flour

200

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.98%

 

Potato Water

25

12.50%

 

Dough Hydration

12.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Boiled Potato

100

50.00%

 

Butter

25

12.50%

 

Total

125

62.50%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

404

Includes Altus

Total Potato Water w/ Starter

232

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

57.43%

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

75.99%

 

 

Total Weight

769

 

 

% Whole Grain

70.13%

 

 

 

Nothing like a good lunch eaten with an iron fist.

 

 

milhomandioca's picture
milhomandioca

Day 1

 

Day 2

 

I'm using Hamelman's sourdough baguette formula. For the scoring I use a blade on a stick. It's hard to get results without regular practice, I'm trying to do it at least once a week. 

For scoring tips and tutorials I read Hamelman's Bread, Michel Suas' Advanced techniques and dmsnyder's really helpful tutorial (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/10121/bread-scoring-tutorial-updated-122009).

Catomi's picture
Catomi

 

Today I baked two loaves of oatmeal porridge bread, about 12 hours apart. The plan was to bake them one after the other (I bake in my cast iron dutch oven and only have the one, so simultaneous baking is out). However, I wound up needing to run an extra errand this morning so the second loaf of bread was left in the fridge all day, until I had time to bake it and it had cooled off enough that I felt OK cranking the oven to 500 degrees. 

The recipe I used was from Tartine No. 3. The texture of this dough during folding was very different than previous loaves; almost stringy, and it felt lumpy during shaping. Perhaps I didn't distribute the oatmeal as well as I should have. 

Here is a pic taken 2 hours into bulk fermentation:

 

Both loaves were proofed overnight in the fridge. Loaf #1 was baked after a 14 hour proof. Here it is just before going in the oven:

 

And after coming out:

 

Crumb:

 

We had some with lunch. The crumb was moist, the crust chewy. It was tasty, but mild. No noticeable sourdough tang, especially compared to the spelt-wheat bread (I did a toast off, because why not?). Both were good, though I preferred the spelt-wheat for toast. I think the oatmeal might be better for sandwiches, especially PBJs where someone who will remain nameless might not appreciate tangy bread. 

Here is Loaf #2 just before going in, after a 26 hour proof:

 

And after baking (I used the same slash pattern because I was curious if they would get similar oven spring; since we already ate some of Loaf #1 it shouldn't be hard to tell them apart):

I'll edit to add crumb pics and flavor notes when I slice it. Right now it's cooling. 

Edit: here's a crumb pic. The inside is very moist, almost tacky. I must not have baked it long enough. :(   It will make good toast, though. Flavor is indeed more tangy. The flavor is quite good, though the texture leaves something to be desired. Oh, and I clearly need to brush excess flour off my loaves before baking. 

 

WoodenSpoon's picture
WoodenSpoon

The other day I noticed that the lavender bush in fornt of my house was blooming, so I figured hey why the heck not. the day before baking I mixed 5g of chef with 5g rye 35g bf and 40g cold water. I let this ferment for around 12 hours then 100g bf and 100g warm water to 50g of the elaborated chef, I let this ferment for around five or six hours then added it to my flour and water and autolysed for around an hour, then i added my lavender buds and honey and proceeded with slap and folds until the dough was properly developed., I then bulk fermented for two or so more hours, shaped and rolled the loaf in a mixture of very corsely ground Himalayan salt and blue cornmeal then proofed it for another two hours. then I baked it on the shy side of an hour at 450 then flipped it out of the pan and browned it up for another few minutes... hot dang it smells so darn good and the salt on the crust really goes well with what could otherwise be a pretty overwhelming flavor.

  • 441g BF
  • 29g Rye
  • 30g AP
  • 175g Levain
  • 47g Raw Honey
  • 11g Fresh Lavender
  • 11g Salt
  •   Corse Salt&Blue Cornmeal for rolling.
Catomi's picture
Catomi

In Tartine No. 3, Robertson says that all of the bread recipes (with the exception of the Rene-style loaves, which are too seedy) can be adapted for crispbreads simply by decreasing hydration to 50-60%. I decided to try this with the brown rice porridge bread, as I think rice crackers are tasty. I added some sesame seeds on top of most of them.

I wound up using:

250 g BRM whole wheat flour 

250 g KA bread flour

35 g wheat germ (from Whole Foods bulk bins)

13 g Morton coarse kosher salt

75 g starter (I use 100% rye, 100% hydration)

250 g distilled water (to get 50% hydration, unless I screwed up the math)

350 g cooked brown rice

The brown rice was rinsed three times and then cooked in 2x tap water. Unfortunately, I got distracted by Youngest Child right as the rice was coming to a boil. Husband said that quite a bit of water had boiled off, so he added an unspecified amount of water and set my timer for me. When the rice was done, it was rather sticky. I cooled it to room temp and coarsely chopped it in a grinder. I mixed all my ingredients (unlike my last batch of crispbreads, the dough was VERY sticky), covered with plastic wrap and set in the fridge overnight. 

Approximately 8 hours later, I removed it from the fridge and rolled it out with the pasta maker. I rolled the first ball to the #6 setting on the pasta maker, with the copious addition of more flour (I didn't measure exactly, but it seemed like i used about 1/4 cup for each 1/5 of the total dough). Sticky, sticky stuff. Rolling it to #6 was too thin to handle, so the rest were rolled to #5. Most were brushed with water and coated with sesame seeds, which ultimately mostly fell off. 

The #6 crispbreads were baked (on parchment paper) for 5-6 minutes at 425 degrees F, until they were starting to brown. The #5 crispbreads were baked for 7-8 minutes. They were all removed from the oven and allowed to cool while we ran an errand. On our return I baked them at 200 degrees F with a wooden spoon propping the oven door open, until they were dry and crisp. 

 

Now that I've actually compared to one of the crispbread recipes in the book, it's obvious that I used way too much water. Also, my recipe was much larger, which explains why I feel like I had neverending crispbreads. Next time I'll double check BEFORE actually mixing my ingredients. Oh well, this was an interesting experiment. 

 

Edit because I forgot to add flavor notes: tasty. Not quite as nutty as rice crackers I've bought commercially, but quite good. It will be tricky to stash these until our trip. I think I would either skip the sesame seeds next time, or make more of a point to press them into the dough. Most fell off. 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

So I've been hooked to "The Ogre" adaptation of Steve Scott's Grain de Lin from Breadlines   Recently it was brought to my attention indirectly that the hydration is actually supposed to be 109% while I've been thrilled with the loaves I made @ 102%.  I've made a couple small batches of this and decided I should share with my farmer friends as it is so good.  My adaptation replaced the "Lin" with "Oger" or flax with barley along with the decrease of hydration by 7%.  I'm calling it The Ogre Loaf.  

For my Tuesday Bake I went with my 70% Whole Wheat which I've done in previous Farmer's Markets but this loaf has given me trouble.  The resulting loaves were okay but not up to my standards and I apologized to my "tasters" but none seemed to mind.  The following day I made a small batch to remedy the situation.  I simply wanted to decrease the bulk ferment (which is where things got away from me).  I ended up doing that and increasing the hydration quite a bit.  The resulting loaf is in the books after one more trial proves it wasn't just a fluke.  You can find this formula here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/38393/farmers-market-week-31-70-ww-take-2-plus-kamut.  The changes to formula shown in below photos are decreased PF to 7% but still a 12 hour overnight build.  Decreased bulk to 2:20 with 4 folds @ 20 minute intervals.  And increased hydration to 110%. I think I'll increase the PF to 10% and that'll be the final change if all goes well.  

 I wanted a snack and made some 100% whole grain Anginettes.  I just subbed soft white wheat for AP flour and got pretty good results.  An Anginettes is a cakey vanilla cookie enrobed in a lemony flat icing.  

Levain: 3-4 hours @ 78-80F

---------------------------------

13 g   Seed Starter (66% hydration)

16 g  H20

13 g  Whole Wheat Flour

-----------------------------------

Soaker: 4 hours (make at same time as final levain)

------------------------------------

150g     Pearled Barley

100 g    Boiling H20

-------------------------------------

Final Dough DDT: 80F

-------------------------------------

672 g     H20

204 g     T85

455g      AP

17 g       Salt

-------------------------------------

Autolyse:  Mix levian with final h20 and flours until combined.  Sprinkle over salt and let rest 30 minutes

Mix  Squeeze and fold through to incorporate salt.  Add soaker (drain any excess h20) and continue squeezing and folding to combine evenly. 

Bulk Fermentation 4:00 with 5 folds @ 30 minute intervels.  Each fold consists of two letter folds followed by a fold from both sides. So three folds in all.  

Divide into 2 750g pices and tightly preshape.  Rest 30 minutes.  Flour your lined bowls generously with rice/ap mix

Shape using the folding technique:

turn out onto flour board and fold bottom half up short of the top.  Stretch from the left and over to middle and repeat from the other side.  Take the top and stretch and bring down and underneath.  tighten slightly using a scraper and your table and let rest a minute or so to seal up.  flour tops and place tops down into bowls.  Retard 15 hours.

Bake @ 500 with steam for 17 minutes and vented for 30-40 more.  A deep full bake is essential here. 

Cool Completely

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The OGRE Loaf

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Improved 70% WW

And the lemony delicious Anginettes

Cheers

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

These sort of cinnamon rolls are similar to the one’s here:

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32275/yeast-water-cinnamon-rolls

 With some differences  The 72%  Ghirardelli Dark chocolate that replaced the original chocolate chips.  We used a 70% whole grain wheat spelt and rye flour mix and the dough weight is about 400 g grams less making there ‘mini’ rolls.

 

On the process side, we did 3 stets of slap and folds on 15 minute intervals of 5. 1 and 1 minute each, let the dough rest 15minutes and then rolled it out 1/4 “ thick and added the fillings.  Once the dough was rolled up and cut into 9 rolls, we placed them in an 8x8 pan and immediately retarded then for 4 hours to fit our next morning bake schedule..

 

Once they came out of the fridge, they were allowed to proof on the counter for 10 hours overnight before baking them at 375 F until they hit 195F on the inside middle.  After a 10 minute rest they were glazed with the GMA’s Lemon powdered sugar glaze.

 

These don’t relly taste or have the texture of puffy soft white flour cinnamon rolls. While the bread part is still soft and very moist, these are less sweet, fruitier and have the dark chocolate undertone which changes the flavor to one all its own.  We like them better than cinnamon rolls and these are healthier too.

 

Formula

Yeast Water Cinnamon Rolls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water Build

Build 1

Total

%

Yeast Water

100

100

30.77%

AP

100

100

30.77%

Total

200

200

61.54%

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water Starter Totals

 

%

 

AP Flour

100

30.77%

 

Water

100

30.77%

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

31.80%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Whole: Wheat, Spelt & Rye

225

69.23%

 

Total Dough Flour

225

69.23%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

1.85%

 

Water

85

26.15%

 

Dough Hydration w/o starter

37.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sugar

15

4.62%

 

Egg

56

17.23%

 

NF Dry Milk powder

12

3.69%

 

Butter

30

9.23%

 

Total

113

34.77%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

325

 

 

Water

185

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

71.69%

 

 

Total Weight

629

 

 

% Whole Grain

69.23%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Filling

 

 

 

100 g of 72% Cocao Chocolate

 

 

3/4 C Cranberries, Raisins & Apricots Rehydrated in 2 T Bourbon

1/2 C Brown Sugar + 1 T White Sugar

 

 

1/2 T Pumpkin Pie Spice

 

 

 

1 YT Cinnamon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glaze

 

 

 

1/4 C Powdered Sugar and 1T of Lemon Juice

 

 

hungryscholar's picture
hungryscholar

If you have thought about getting a sourdough culture going but don't feel up for a lot of watching and waiting, I highly recommend the method outlined by Ian on his now rather empty Ars Pistorica blog. I nearly posted yesterday, because it sure looked like sourdough starter and tasted like it, and had lots of little bubbles. But, I feel, the proof is in the pudding, or my old friend, sourdough bread. So, here I am Sunday morning with two little loaves that managed to surprise me with some solid oven spring 10 hours after bulk fermentation start.

And here's how I built the starter, Ian's method more or less to a T:

Wenesday, 10 PM, 20g Bob's Red Mil Dark Rye + 240g tap water(warm, around 77 F, possibly filtered) both weighed into a ziploc baggie, mixed and then the sealed baggie placed in a plastic container of warm water and that placed in my proofer set at 99 F. I know it is starting to sound a bit like I am making a turducken here, but bear with me. Anyway, that sat in the proofer for around 18 hours, at which point the proofer had lots of condensation and the water in the container the ziploc bag was in was a toasty 108 degrees. And there was clearly lots of activity inside the bag with active bubbles. Which takes me to...

Thursday, 4PM, Open ziploc briefly to add a premeasured 100 g of Whole Wheat Bread flour, from Great River Milling. I do note some less than pleasant smell at this point, hence the quick open of the bag to add the fresh flour. Then back it goes into the plastic container, now emptied of its water, and the proofer set down to 88 F. 20 hours later...

Friday 12 Noon. Into a new container, measure out 45 g water + 100 g more of the Great River flour and then take 30 g of the mixture from the baggie, where again there were plenty of bubbles. I knead this into a lump of dough and return it in its container to the proofer now set down to 80 F and wait another 20 hours or so...

Saturday 8:30 AM At this point the lump of dough shows all signs of looking like and quacking like the sourdough starter which I know and love, so I take some and use it to bake my approximation of SF Sourdough by way of my interpretation of some very helpful posts around these parts on the Larraburu Brothers Bakery...

Saturday Noon- I get around to feeding some of the remaining new starter, 1 part starter: 1 part water : 1 part AP : 1 part Whole Wheat.

Saturday 9:30 PM, Bake.

Sunday, 9:17 AM, Eat.

 

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