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emkay's picture
emkay

Drinking, eh, I mean, baking for Saint Patrick's Day...
spd

Guinness chocolate cupcakes
choc_stout_cc_baked

Cored and ready to be filled
choc_stout_cc_cored

With a chocolate truffle ganache made with Jameson Irish Whiskey
choc_stout_cc_filled

And frosted with Baileys Irish Cream Swiss buttercream
choc_stout_cc_frosted

Eat
choc_stout_cc_inside

Mebake's picture
Mebake

For this past Market day, I've baked the same breads I often bake For all preceding Arts and crafts markets: A Rye , A Whole Wheat multigrain, and a country White loaf.  For This market ,however, I've baked all three of them. a 7 Kg. worth of Rye dough, 5.5 Kg. Worth of Whole wheat multigrain, and 5kg. worth of Tartine’s Sesame bread dough; yielding a total dough of 17.5 Kg!  All bread was baked in three consecutive days, and none were frozen. Phew!

The day began at the registration desk , followed by a random table draw. I was seated in a far corner on the ground floor this time. I prepared the table for display, and readied myself for the big day. Immediately, I began preparing samplers for customers who’d like to have a taste of my breads. I had a chocolate vendor to my left, and a jewelry designer to my right; all were friendly and courteous.

Customers began to show up on my table, and many were interested in Artisan bread. Occasionally, some would ask if I had gluten free breads, in fact, many here appear to have gluten intolerance. I think I might have to learn how to make GF breads soon. A German gentleman accompanied by his family has also shown a good deal of interest in Artisan breads; notably Rye. I quote him saying: “mmm, this is really authentic!”, as he chewed down a piece of the 80% rye bread. That was heartwarming.  A Georgian lady picked up some Rye bread and a Russian, too. I told the latter that I bake Borodinsky bread, and she gasped with a smile cheerfully : OHH, really?!! Apparently, I struck a nerve there. Most eastern European expats living in the region yearn for their bread back home.

Old clients tracked me down, of course, and nailed their share of bread. By the end of the Market day, I had half a boule of sesame bread left that was eventually sold to a neighboring vendor. Had I more loaves left, I would have been sold out too, but this is the maximum capacity my oven can handle.

So, that was it! The Market day drew to an end, so i packed my gear and left. Despite the back ache that persisted throughout the day, I felt a soothing sense of satisfaction and achievement that kept my spirit up. 

Khalid

 

 

 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

My husband is an artist when it comes to pasta. Always wonderful . Tonight homemade tagliatelle and a shrimp topping based on one that our son , the Chef , makes frequently. Preserved lemon and capers are the key...oh...and the homemade hot cure peppers. If you want the recipe just ask...I will be glad to forward the gist of the idea .c 

 photo IMG_6917_zps2cc8b0f6.jpg

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

oh my...apple pie !  

 

 

before baking...  photo IMG_6914_zps8118b68c.jpg after...most amazing...2 apples and a small amount of " goop"...if you want I will post the link to recipe...so easy.  photo IMG_6915_zpse6e5f0c6.jpg

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Bulger Wheat Sourdough collage

Crumb Shot

Also made some Green Onion "Pita" Bread

Cheers,

Wingnut

isand66's picture
isand66

 Just in time for St. Paddy's Day I figured I would make another bread using beer along with some freshly milled flours.  I had bought some Farmers Cheese meaning to make pierogi again but have not had a chance to do so yet, so into the cauldron it went :).

I wanted a sour, sour dough and nothing in my experience makes a bread more sour than mixing beer with rye flour and letting it bulk ferment overnight in the refrigerator.  To make sure the dough wasn't as sour as a barrel of pickles I added some Kamut flour and white winter wheat  to round off the flavor profile.

The Farmers Cheese has a pretty high water content which I tried to account for in the formula below by breaking out the water separately so this dough was really wet.  Unfortunately I was preparing this dough along with my last bread and working at the same time and I didn't re-flour my basket before putting the dough in it.  When I un-molded the dough part of it stuck to the bottom so this is not going to win any beauty prizes.  It does however taste pretty good with a nice sour tang.  You can definitely taste the addition of the beer so if you if you don't like beer, this one is not for you.

I'm not sure if the way I added the water and beer along with the additional water content of the cheese was calculated correctly.  Actual beer for recipe was 361 grams plus 64 grams of water to the main dough.  The starter was built up in 2 stages with 75 grams of water added in stage one and 92 grams added in stage 2.

(Note: I just updated the formulas with some help from Jacqueline from BreadStorm.  She helped me add the starter hydration and the water from the farmers cheese correctly.  Please note that the total amount of Farmers Cheese is 213 grams.)

Formula

 Ian's Farmer Cheese Beer Bread (JC edit) (%)Ian's Farmer Cheese Beer Bread (JC edit) (weights)

Levain Directions Build 1

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofing box set at 82 degrees and it took around 5 hours.

Levain Directions Build 2

Mix the 75 grams of Kamut with the 52 grams of WW along with 92 grams of water to the first build and let it ferment until doubled.  Since I used my proofing box at 82 degrees again it took about 4 hours.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, beer and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), , and Farmers Cheese, and olive oil and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.  I made 1 large boule shape.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 500 degrees and after another 3 minutes lower it to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb1

CrumbCloseup

 

 
dosco's picture
dosco

Made 2 batards for my first Engineering Staff Meeting today. I followed the Reinhart BBA recipe but used 50% WW flour, upped hydration to ~77%, warm fermented for ~1 hour at 100dF followed by cold fermentation for 48 hours in the fridge, and hearth baked at 550dF for ~15 minutes followed by 450dF until done. Nice oven spring this time, got a nice ear on one loaf. Co-workers liked it. Gave one to a friend (of the 2 loaves about 1/2 of 1 loaf was eaten by my coworkers).

Cheers-

Dave

Loaf in a jury-rigged couche

 

 

Crumb shot

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This year we decided to update our Ballymaloe 100% whole wheat bake from last year by including a 100 % white shamrock on top of the 100 % whole wheat base.  We cut the scald by 25% and used Young’s Double Chocolate Stout for the liquid in the while wheat portion.

  

I know what you are saying and I jumped on Lucy for not using Guinness instead of an English stout but she was ready for me.  The YW white bread, that used the soaker liquid from the wheat berry scald, has chocolate covered pepitas in the mix as its add in and Guinness doesn’t come in a double chocolate flavor and chocolate was the uniting thread in this 100% whole grain brown and 100% white bread.

 

The SD version had a 2 stage 6 hour levain build and the YW version had a 1 stage 12 hour build where it was stirred down at the 4 and 8 hour marks.  All the leavin building was done on the heating pad at 82 F.  Both the SD 66% hydration seed and the YW came out of the fridge with the SD in there a week and the YW in there at least a month.  Once both 100% hydration levains had doubled they went in the fridge for 24 hours.

 

Both of the dough went though the same process, autolyse (no salt or levain) of 3 hours for the WW and 1 hour for the YW version.  Once the salt and levain were added we did (2) sets of slap and folds of 5 and 1 minutes for both and then 3 sets of S&F’s on 20 minute intervals.  Both deveoped gluten well.

 

The add ins were incorporated on the first set of S&F’s and they were evenly distributed by the end of the third set.  Since the kitchen was 76-78 F during most of the hand work, we didn’t get out the heating pad to keep the dough warm.

 

We found a hot cross bun in the freezer this morning and made it into a shamrock for breakfast.  It has been in the freezer for almost a year and it tasted just as good as the original - amazing!

We shaped the YW white dough into a circle and then used the dough knife to cut it into the shape of a 4 petal shamrock with a stem and tried to place it in the bottom of the basket but it just wouldn’t go in as a shamrock and looked like a misshapen round alien thing instead.

 

If we would have shaped each petal separately and placed them that way, like we normally do,  it would have been way easier and actually looked like a shamrock in the end – so don’t do like we did so you don’t have to slash a shamrock on the top of the bread before baking like we did – which turned out to be another fiasco.

 

The much larger WW SD brown portion was air shaped into a huge bialy and placed on top of the white blob in the basket.  At this point, the dough was retarded for 12 hours in the fridge.

 

At the 12 hour mark we removed the dough from the fridge to warm on the counter as we pre-heated Big Old Betsy to 550 F.   Once BOB was at 550 F we placed 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans and one large pan of steaming lava rocks in the bottom of the oven and let them get to billowing steam speed which took 15 more minute allowing the 2 lagging stones to get to get to 550 F too.

 

Weun-molded he dough onto parchment on a  peel, crudely scored a shamrock on the white portion of the dough and slid it into the oven for a 15 minute steam at 475 F.   We then took out the steam and baked the bread at 425 F  for 25 more minutes until the inside hit 205 F.

 

It sprang and bloomed pretty well under the steam and heat and browned up boldly too.  The white YW shamrock portion also got some blisters as we hoped it would to set itself apart from the WW brown part,which had small blisters - quite a contrast..  It smelled wonderful as it baked.  We will wait on the crumb shots until after lunch.

The crumb for the 100% WW SD portion was as open as one could expect and the crumb for the YW white portion was not as open as it could have been if we didn't overwork it so much getting it shaped and plopping it in the basket and then trying to make it look like a shamrock:-)  Both were tasty, especially the SD WW portion but the chocolate Pumpkin seeds were a treat too.

How did that smoked chicken and ribs get in there?

The crumb was soft, glossy and moist while the crust stayed a little bit crisp as it cooled.  It sure ended up being a nice looking bread on the inside and out and Lucy is especially happy the shamrock scoring came though, to sort of actually look like one,  if you are half blind!  This bread should hold up well against the corned beef and cabbage to served on St Patrick's Day the world over.

This bread cost $4.25 cents to make, including electricity, but $2 of that was the double chocolate stout:-)  In contrast, our normal white SD bread, weighing in at pound and half baked, comes in at 99 cents a loaf.

SD Brown Bread with WW Scald & Double Chocolate Stout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

RyeSD Starter

15

0

15

3.02%

Whole Wheat

30

60

90

22.50%

Water

30

60

90

22.50%

Total

75

120

195

48.75%

 

 

 

 

 

SD Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

97.5

24.38%

 

 

Water

97.5

24.38%

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

18.16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Whole Wheat

400

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.00%

 

 

Double Chocolaate Stout

334

83.50%

 

 

Dough Hydration

83.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

497.5

 

 

 

D. Chocolate Stout & SD Starter Water

431.5

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration with Starter

86.73%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

101.21%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

85.65%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,074

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.75%

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.75%

 

 

VW Gluten

12

3.00%

 

 

Ground Sesame & Flax seeds

24

6.00%

 

 

Molasses

20

5.00%

 

 

Total

62

15.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

WW Berries

75

18.75%

 

 

 

White YW Shamrock

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter

Build 1

%

AP

82

32.80%

Yeast Water

82

32.80%

Total

164

65.60%

Levain % of Total

26.07%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

AP

250

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

5

2.00%

Wheat Soaker Water

160

64.00%

Dough Hydration

64.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

332

 

Wheat Soaker Water

242

 

T. Dough Hydration wih Starter

72.89%

 

Total Weight

629

 

 

 

 

Chocolate Pepitas

50

20.00%

 Lucy was pretty tuckered out after this one but she looks satisfied that it turned out all right in the end.  Happy St Patrick's Day to all.

mycroft's picture
mycroft

So, I work in fashion, and I love baking for my friends, and this is what happens when you bake bread for people in the fashion industry, they turn it into a mini fashion shoot featuring expensive jewellery. but anyways...

so the bread in the photo is a SD Saffron Boule. This week, I have made a few baked goodies as gifts, the SD Saffron Boule, SD Lemon Boule, SD Jam Buns, Palm Sugar (Gula Melaka) Cup Cakes and some Melting Moment Cookies

 

The Saffron Boule recipe came from SallyBR's http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29516/golden-saffron-sourdough and though mine did not come out as golden in colour as hers, the aroma was definitely very appetizing! I also love that she has adopted the 3,2,1 recipe which i find very useful when baking with the heart, and not the weight scale.. just winging it, I guess?

 

Lemon on the left and Saffron on the right

crumb of the saffron loaf (i made an extra for myself. no crumb shot of lemon though!)

personal gift tags with ingredient lists.

 

Palm Sugar Cupcakes, Melting Moments and Jam Buns.

NillaFish's picture
NillaFish

Made this beautiful loaf today. Very soft and cottony, Asian style bread. More about this on my blog (check my profile). I will post about it soon, I promise! 

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