The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

Blogs

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

The following are links to our Community Bakes

Below are tips & ideas that you may find useful. 
You can use THIS LINK to view all tips in a web browser.

For those in the US, the History of King Arthur Flour Company is very interesting and historic.

Although not listed as a tip, the links below may prove interesting for some.

Miscellaneous Blog Post

A compilation of my bakes during a Community Bake

 

I am trying to use a Table of Contents for my BLOG. Links to blogged bakes will be posted to this page. I plan to post a link to this page on all BLOG bakes, experiments, tips, Community Bakes, etc..

Benito's picture
Benito

We’re back down in Fort Lauderdale for 2.5 months and Alan was kind enough to share some of his starter with me, thank you Alan.  He also gave me some SAF gold and red IDY along with some whole rye.  Immediately I note how different his starter smells than mine.  Mine is fed 100% whole rye and has a much more sour smell.  This starter is fed KA AP I believe and is much less sour and a bit sweet smelling.

We had no bread so I thought I’d bake using Alan’s starter and to also gradually adjust my Hokkaido milk bread formula.  I’ve decided to use a 1:2 ratio of flour to milk for the tangzhong, this allows me to increase the percentage of flour in the tangzhong from 7 to 15%, the greatest I’ve tried so far.  From what I’ve recently read this should allow a great flavour improvement and texture improvement from the tangzhong.  If I was still using the 1:5 ratio at 15%, there wouldn’t be any liquid left for the dough mix since most if not all of the liquid for the dough would be in the tangzhong.

For one 9x4x4” Pullman pan loaf.

 

Instructions

Levain

Mix the levain ingredients in a jar or pyrex container with space for at least 300% growth. 

Press down with your knuckles or silicone spatula to create a uniform surface and to push out air.

At a temperature of 76-78ºF, it typically takes up to 10-12 hours for this sweet stiff levain to be at peak.  For my starter I typically see 3-3.5 times increase in size at peak.  The levain will smell sweet with only a mild tang.

Tangzhong 

In a sauce pan set on medium heat, stir the milk and whole wheat flour until blended. Then cook for several minutes until well thickened, stirring regularly with a spoon or heat-resistant spatula. Let cool in the pan or, for faster results, in a new bowl.  Theoretically it should reach 65ºC (149ºF) but I don’t find I need to measure the temperature as the tangzhong gelatinizes at this temperature.  You can prepare this the night before and refrigerate it, ensure that it is covered to prevent it from drying out.

 

If you plan on using a stand mixer to mix this dough, set up a Bain Marie and use your stand mixer’s bowl to prepare the tangzhong.

 

Dough

In the bowl of a stand mixer, add the milk (consider holding back 10 g of milk and adding later if this is the first time you’re making this), egg, tangzhong, salt, sugar and levain.  Mix and then break up the levain into many smaller pieces.  Next add the flours.  I like to use my spatula to mix until there aren’t many dry areas.  Allow the flour to hydrate (fermentolyse) for 20-30 minutes.  Mix on low speed and then medium speed until moderate gluten development this may take 5-10 mins.  You may want to scrape the sides of the bowl during the first 5 minutes of mixing.  Next add room temperature butter one pat at a time.  The dough may come apart, be patient, continue to mix until it comes together before adding in more butter.  Once all the butter has been added and incorporated increase the speed gradually to medium. Mix at medium speed until the gluten is well developed, approximately 10 mins.  You will want to check gluten development by windowpane during this time and stop mixing when you get a good windowpane.  You should be able to pull a good windowpane, not quite as good as a white flour because the bran will interrupt the windowpane somewhat. 

 

On the counter, shape the dough into a tight ball, cover in the bowl and ferment for 2 - 3 hours at 82ºF.  There should be some rise visible at this stage.

 

You can next place the dough into the fridge to chill the dough for about 1.5 hours, this makes rolling the dough easier to shape.  Remember, if you do so the final proof will take longer.  Alternatively, you can do a cold retard in the fridge overnight, however, you may find that this increases the tang in your bread.

 

Prepare your pans by greasing them with butter or line with parchment paper.  

 

Lightly flour the top of the dough. Scrape the dough out onto a clean counter top and divide it into four. I like to weigh them to have equal sized lobes. Shape each tightly into a boule, allow to rest 5 mins. Using a rolling pin roll each ball out and then letterfold. Turn 90* and using a rolling pin roll each out to at least 8”. Letterfold again from the sides so you have a long narrow dough. Then using a rolling pin, roll flatter but keeping the dough relatively narrow.  The reason to do this extra letterfold is that the shorter fatter rolls when placed in the pan will not touch the sides of the pan.  This allows the swirled ends to rise during final proof, this is only done for appearance sake and is not necessary.  Next roll each into a tight roll with some tension. Arrange the rolls of dough inside your lined pan alternating the direction of the swirls. This should allow a greater rise during proof and in the oven.

 

Cover and let proof for  4-6 hours at a warm temperature.  I proof at 82°F.  You will need longer than 4-6 hours if you chilled your dough for shaping. I proof until the top of the dough comes to within 1 cm of the top edge of the pan.

 

Preheat the oven to 350F and brush the dough with the egg-milk wash.  Just prior to baking brush with the egg-milk wash again.

 

Bake the loaves for 50 minutes or until the internal temperature is at least 190ºF, rotating as needed to get even browning. Shield your loaf if it gets brown early in the baking process. After 50 mins remove the bread from the pan and bake a further 10 mins by placing the loaf directly in the oven on the rack with the oven turned down to 325ºF. You can brush the top of the loaf with butter if you wish at this point while the bread is still hot to keep the top crust soft.

CalBeachBaker's picture
CalBeachBaker

Today's bake: Pane di Farro

Source: Sourdough Recipes for Rustic Fermented Breads Sweets, Savories, and More - Sarah Owens

Note(s): Modified fermenting times, sprinkled bannetons with extracted wheat bran.

This bread is made from a 40% Organic Heirloom Red Fife Wheat-80% Extract, 25.45% of Bread Flour (KA), 23.03% Organic Farro (Emmer)-100% Extract, and 10.91% Organic Rye-100% Extract.

One loaf is baked in a Challenger bread pan which produced a really crispy crust, another on a baking steel with a steam pan which produces a less crunchy crust.

This is my 1st attempt making this bread and will definitely will be baking it again.

Changes/Recommendations - When I make this bread again - work on improving the scoring.

Tasting Notes

Crumb: Sweet/Dairy - Milk - there is a nice combination of flavors due to the 4 types of flour. The flavors I'm getting are nice mix of nuttiness and a little tannin.

Crust: Crust: Resinous - French Roast Coffee Beans

Grain Character: Complex - Cooked Whole Grains.

This is a really nice dense bread which I will be making again.

Recipe and Process are below for those that are interested.

 

Sanctum7's picture
Sanctum7

I just wanted to share this lovely 100% einkorn loaf baked in the Breadtopia clay loaf baker!  It came out with a wonderful ear and lovely even crumb! No more crust issues.  Thaks for sharing all of your successes.  

 

CalBeachBaker's picture
CalBeachBaker

Today's bake: Butternut Squash & Cherry Bread

Source: Sourdough Recipes for Rustic Fermented Breads Sweets, Savories, and More - Sarah Owens

Note(s): Modified fermenting times, increased cherries from 10% to 18%

This bread is made from a majority of KA bread flour, some Palouse Brand Hard Red Winter Wheat-100% Extract, Organic Rye-100% Extract.

There are in addition pureed butternut squash and dried tart cherries as add-ins that provide a wonderful flavor and texture to this bread.

One loaf is baked in a Challenger bread pan which produced a really crispy crust, another on a baking steel with a steam pan which produces a less crunchy crust.

This is my 1st attempt making this bread and will definitely will be baking it again.

Changes/Recommendations - When I make this bread again - less flour in the banneton.

Tasting Notes

Crumb: Sweet/Dairy - Butter - there is a nice undertone of the butternut squash in the crumb when you're not biting into a cherry. The tartness of the cherries provide a nice contrast to the overall creamy/nutty flavors.

Crust: Roasted - Roasted - Baked Onions/Vegetables.

Grain Character: Complex - Cooked Whole Grains.

This is a really nice dense bread which I will be making again.

Recipe and Process are below for those that are interested.

 

squattercity's picture
squattercity

As I had rye malt on hand and half a bag of light rye, I decided to try my hand at this Lithuanian palanga rye, an interesting recipe that calls for a sourdough levain, a flour and malt scald, and a yeast levain. I made it with 1/3 light rye and 2/3 whole rye.

It's a fantastic bread. The light touch of caraway (just 2 g) allows the tart seeds to tickle your mouth beneath the mellow spice of the rye. The crumb is so juicy that my partner thought I might have added beer to the batter. And the star of the show is the caramelized crust that, despite being thick, is not hard but rather crisp and shattery and melt-in-your-mouth sweet.

 

Two weird things: First, the light rye I used -- Mąka żytnia chlebowa typ 720 -- is insanely thirsty. The scald, though it was 130% hydration, remained astoundingly firm. And, to get all the flour to absorb into the final mix, I had to add 125g of water, upping the full dough hydration from 64% to 77%. Then, after all that, the bulk and proof were more rapid than the recipe specified -- 2 hours total instead of 3.

 

But I'm not complaining. I'm enjoying. This is a strikingly different rye -- deep and super-subtle at the same time. It's interesting to make and great to eat.

 

Rob

 

 

Benito's picture
Benito

We are soon departing for warmer climes so our lovely neighbour will be taking care of our mail for us.  So to thank them in advance I like to bake them a loaf of bread.  I decided to bake them a simple Hokkaido milk bread with some whole wheat and extra flavour from toasted sesame seeds.

I recently saw a video that suggested that tangzhong shouldn’t actually be at a ratio of 1:5 flour:liquid.  In fact, you are supposed to get more benefit in keeping the freshness, softness of crumb and flavour from ratios between 1:1 to 1:2.  As well, the flour in the tangzhong should aim to be between 10-20% to really get the taste benefits of the tangzhong.  By decreasing the liquid in the tangzhong it is much easier to increase the percentage of flour in the tangzhong,  When it was 1:5, what I thought was classic, you are really limited in how much of the flour can be in the tangzhong, because you reach a point where there is no hydration to make the dough.  So this is my first bake of a Hokkaido milk bread with these alterations to the tangzhong.  Although I will not have either any crumb photos, nor will I be able to taste this bread, I can say that the dough handled very well.  Although I reduced the milk in the tangzhong, I kept the overall hydration the same.


 For one 9x4x4” Pullman pan loaf.

 

50 g toasted sesame seeds.

 

Instructions

Levain

Mix the levain ingredients in a jar or pyrex container with space for at least 300% growth. 

Press down with your knuckles or silicone spatula to create a uniform surface and to push out air.

At a temperature of 76-78ºF, it typically takes up to 10-12 hours for this sweet stiff levain to be at peak.  For my starter I typically see 3-3.5 times increase in size at peak.  The levain will smell sweet with only a mild tang.

Tangzhong 

In a sauce pan set on medium heat, stir the milk and whole wheat flour until blended. Then cook for several minutes until well thickened, stirring regularly with a spoon or heat-resistant spatula. Let cool in the pan or, for faster results, in a new bowl.  Theoretically it should reach 65ºC (149ºF) but I don’t find I need to measure the temperature as the tangzhong gelatinizes at this temperature.  You can prepare this the night before and refrigerate it, ensure that it is covered to prevent it from drying out.

 

If you plan on using a stand mixer to mix this dough, set up a Bain Marie and use your stand mixer’s bowl to prepare the tangzhong.

 

Dough

In the bowl of a stand mixer, add the milk (consider holding back 10 g of milk and adding later if this is the first time you’re making this), egg, tangzhong, salt, sugar and levain.  Mix and then break up the levain into many smaller pieces.  Next add the flours.  I like to use my spatula to mix until there aren’t many dry areas.  Allow the flour to hydrate (fermentolyse) for 20-30 minutes.  Mix on low speed and then medium speed until moderate gluten development this may take 5-10 mins.  You may want to scrape the sides of the bowl during the first 5 minutes of mixing.  Next add room temperature butter one pat at a time.  The dough may come apart, be patient, continue to mix until it comes together before adding in more butter.  Once all the butter has been added and incorporated increase the speed gradually to medium. Mix at medium speed until the gluten is well developed, approximately 10 mins.  You will want to check gluten development by windowpane during this time and stop mixing when you get a good windowpane.  You should be able to pull a good windowpane, not quite as good as a white flour because the bran will interrupt the windowpane somewhat. 

 

On the counter, shape the dough into a tight ball, cover in the bowl and ferment for 2 - 3 hours at 82ºF.  There should be some rise visible at this stage.

 

You can next place the dough into the fridge to chill the dough for about 1.5 hours, this makes rolling the dough easier to shape.  Remember, if you do so the final proof will take longer.  Alternatively, you can do a cold retard in the fridge overnight, however, you may find that this increases the tang in your bread.

 

Prepare your pans by greasing them with butter or line with parchment paper.  

 

Lightly flour the top of the dough. Scrape the dough out onto a clean counter top and divide it into four. I like to weigh them to have equal sized lobes. Shape each tightly into a boule, allow to rest 5 mins. Using a rolling pin roll each ball out and then letterfold. Turn 90* and using a rolling pin roll each out to at least 8”. Letterfold again from the sides so you have a long narrow dough. Then using a rolling pin, roll flatter but keeping the dough relatively narrow.  The reason to do this extra letterfold is that the shorter fatter rolls when placed in the pan will not touch the sides of the pan.  This allows the swirled ends to rise during final proof, this is only done for appearance sake and is not necessary.  Next roll each into a tight roll with some tension. Arrange the rolls of dough inside your lined pan alternating the direction of the swirls. This should allow a greater rise during proof and in the oven.

 

Cover and let proof for  4-6 hours at a warm temperature.  I proof at 82°F.  You will need longer than 4-6 hours if you chilled your dough for shaping. I proof until the top of the dough comes to within 1 cm of the top edge of the pan.

 

Preheat the oven to 350F and brush the dough with the egg-milk wash.  Just prior to baking brush with the egg-milk wash again.

 

Bake the loaves for 50 minutes or until the internal temperature is at least 190ºF, rotating as needed to get even browning. Shield your loaf if it gets brown early in the baking process. After 50 mins remove the bread from the pan and bake a further 10 mins by placing the loaf directly in the oven on the rack with the oven turned down to 325ºF. You can brush the top of the loaf with butter if you wish at this point while the bread is still hot to keep the top crust soft.

My index of bakes.

alfanso aka Vito Scoreleone's picture
alfanso aka Vit...

Clearly several non-truisms here.  No corkscrew, no scissors, no actual knife.  But the reason that I labeled the post as such - I've used the Bouabsa formula to make:

Pullman loaves

 

Focaccia

 

Pizza

  

Ciabatta

 

Batard

 

 Of course Baguettes

  

And yesterday's beastly 80% AP, 10%WW and 10% Rye Baguettes/ Long Batards - my first deviation from the standard formula.

I'm neither implying that there aren't other formulas out there every bit as versatile.  Nor even that this dough rivals other doughs specifically created for the other types of breads. However, this easy as pie IDY dough has become a trusted partner in my kitchen crime wave.

Vito Scoreleone 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

 

Please see here and here to learn more about concentrated lactic acid sourdough (CLAS).

 

 

This one is for fun. See my spelt noodle and soba posts for more details. 

 

 Ingredients

 

A.

4% whole durum flour from whole durum CLAS 

8% whole rye flour from whole rye CLAS 

68% fresh whole wheat flour

20% fresh whole durum flour

 

6% water from whole durum CLAS 

15% water from whole rye CLAS 

28% whole egg (1)

 

1.5% salt 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use lye water in half of the dough but find little difference in texture, maybe because the dough has sourdough.

 

 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

 

Please see here and here to learn more about concentrated lactic acid sourdough (CLAS). 

 

 

 

This whole-spelt noodle requires a little more work than soba, but not too bad.

 

Ingredients

 

A.

13% whole spelt flour from whole spelt CLAS

81% fresh whole spelt flour 

19% water from whole spelt CLAS 

33% whole egg (1)

season the dough to taste

 

 

B. 

6% extra whole spelt flour  

 

Dough consistency when done mixing. Total dough weight ~250g. Rest 1-2 hours ( I wonder if I can do without resting the dough🤔🤔🤔)

 

divide into 5 x 50g dough balls

 

pasta roller#1 x 1, fold; repeat 3-4 times until the dough is smooth.

pasta roller#2 x 2-3

pasta roller#3 x 2

pasta roller#4 x 1

place the dough sheets between parchment paper

 

 

fettuccine cutter x 1

 

 

What a scene (to a newbie)!

 

See my soba noodle post for cooking setup. 

 

Thinner noodles have a more delicate texture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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