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Benito

This is a modified bake that I last did in the winter and wanted to do again now that I have a good pH meter.  40% whole Kamut, 40% whole spelt and 20% bread flour, so lots of whole grain.

I did an overnight levain build at 74ºF but starting with 3ºC water.  I also did an overnight saltolyse without the holdback water also starting with 3ºC water.  This was left a cool room temperature to saltolyse.

The next morning about 9.5 hours later the levain had peaked at > 3.5 x rise and was added to the dough.  Once mixed well with Rubaud kneading it was left for 15 mins.  The hold back water was gradually added and once completely incorporated 15 mins rest was done again followed by 400 slap and folds to ensure good gluten development.  pH was 5.49.

After 30 mins rest a bench letterfold was done.  At this point aliquot jars were prepared, one for measuring rise and the other to measure pH.  

Four sets of coil folds were done at 30 mins intervals each time the dough had relaxed.  By the end of the fourth and final coil fold the pH was 5.13 and the rise was already 20%.  What I found with this dough was that the pH drops were less than expected for the degree of rise attained.  A few possible reasons for this.  First spelt is very extensible, so that for the same degree of fermentation a dough that has a large percentage of spelt may rise more.  This was also the reason I didn’t do a lamination because of spelt’s poor gluten quality.  Second, as you know whole grains are a better buffer of acid than low extraction flours so for the same degree of fermentation a dough with more whole grains will have a higher pH.

The dough reached a pH of only 4.64 with a 60% rise.  Typically since measuring pH I have found that I am shaping at a rise of 40-50% with a pH of 4.2 or so for doughs with < 25% whole grain.  Finally final bench proofing ended when the dough reached 95-100% rise and a pH of only 4.41 which is much higher than I usually shoot for with lower whole grain doughs where the pH might be 3.9-4.0 at the start of cold retard.

 

 

 

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Benito

I’ve made this recipe for baguettes before with the seeds on the crust, this is the first time I’ve made baguettes with inclusions, so black sesame seeds in the dough.  It is a much tidier way to add the sesame seed flavour so you don’t cover your floor with sesame seeds when slicing the baguettes.  

I didn’t make a new spreadsheet showing the addition of the black sesame seeds.  I simply added them during stretch and folds after bassinage was complete.

Overnight levain build with cold filtered water, refrigerate levain and then take out of fridge before bedtime.

In the morning dissolve diastatic malt and levain in water.  Then add flour and mix to shaggy mass.  Rest 20 mins then add salt and gradually add bassinage water, do Rubaud kneading for 4-5 mins until dough is smooth.  

Remove approximately 40 g of dough and set up your aliquot jar.  How to use an aliquot jar.

Ferment at 82ºF, after 50 mins do coil folds, then after another 50 mins do another coil fold.  Once the aliquot jar shows a 20% rise the dough is placed into the fridge until the following day.  At 80ºF this is about 4 hours or so.

The dough is divided and pre-shaped as loose cylinders and left to rest covered at room temperature for 30 mins.  The dough is then shaped, placed on a wet towel and rolled in poppy seeds.  Finally they are placed on a floured couche seam side up and left at room temperature for 40 mins to proof.  Aliquot jar rise to 30%. 

With 10 mins left of bench rest the oven is started 500ºF to preheat.  When the 40 mins of bench rest is completed the shaped baguettes are placed in a bag and returned to the refrigerator for 30-40 mins to chill to make scoring easier.  Once this time is over the baguettes are scored and immediately placed on the baking steel and boiling water is added to the cast iron skillet.  The Sylvia towel with boiling water was placed in the oven 30 mins prior to baking time.

The oven temperature is jacked up to 525ºF to get the burners to activate immediately and then once activated dropped to 480ºF.  The baguettes are baked with steam for 13 mins.  The steam equipment is removed venting the oven of steam.  The oven is left at 480ºF but convection is turned on and the baguettes bake for 10 mins rotating them halfway.  The oven temperature is then dropped to 450ºF and the baguettes rotated again if needed and baked for another 3 mins to achieve a rich colour crust.

 

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Benito

Well it is almost fall and soon Instagram will be full of pumpkin shaped breads. I have never tried to make one of these so thought it might be fun to do. I also haven’t shaped a boule in sometime so thought I was due.

I still have some mashed purple sweet potato from months ago that I prepared using the instant pot and froze in small portions. I will say that the addition of purple sweet potato to this dough seems to slow down the yeast which surprised me somewhat. As I have been doing lately, I prepare two aliquot jars to watch fermentation, one for rise and the other to measure pH. The gradual fall in pH was as expected so the potato wasn’t affecting LAB at all. However, the rise was extremely slow. I typically see a rise of 40-50% with a pH of around 4.4-4.5, but for this loaf there was only a 20% rise at a pH of 4.4. At that point I did shape this. The dough was left in the banneton until the pH reached 3.9 at which time cold retard was started.

I dipped the string in neutral oil to help make them release more easily after baking. The photos show my process in preparing the dough for final bake. The oven was preheated at 500ºF. Once scored the dough was baked at 450ºF with steam for 20 mins, then the steam was exhausted and the temperature was dropped to 420ºF and the loaf was baked for another 30 mins turning halfway through.

 Overall I’m pleased with the external appearance of this loaf. I can see one spot where the outward spring of the dough tore the crust. I think that could be avoided by tying the string a bit less tight or overproofing the dough a bit more.
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Benito

Apparently this bread is also known as tourte Auvergnate.  It is a 100% whole rye loaf and mine was made without any commercial yeast although I’ve seen recipes that use it in as a sponge along with the rye sour.  Those who are familiar with baking rye sourdoughs know that they ferment very quickly.  From building the first stage of the rye levain until the loaf is out of the oven only took 18 hours.  However, you’re also likely aware that rye breads need time to “cure” after baking so I think they are best if you wait 24-48 hours before slicing.  Based on my first bake of a 100% rye loaf I will wait 48 hours because I found that the rye flavour was more pronounced at 48 compared with 24 hours, and if you’re baking a 100% rye sourdough you want to taste the rye, no?

When recipes for rye say to flour the countertop or your hands, they do mean generously.  At the time of shaping I didn’t have quite enough flour down and was getting a ton of sticking.  Fortunately if you have your dough scraper handy, and of course you would, it is easy enough to get more flour under that sticky dough.  I use the word shape loosely because really you’re molding the dough into a boule.  Forget trying to create any tension, there isn’t the gluten of wheat in this dough so really you’re moulding it like clay.

Rye %:100%
Stages:Stage 1 sponge, Stage 2 sponge, Final dough
Leaven:Rye sour culture
Start to Finish:14-16 hours
Hands-on Time:25-30 minutes
Yield:Two 1¾ lb/800 g loave

Stage 1 sponge (Day 1, Evening):

Ingredient Grams 2x800g loaves 1x900 g loaf (0.5625) Baker’s

Percentage
Wholegrain rye flour 118 66 g 100%
Warm (105°F/41°C) water 118 66 g 100%
Rye sour culture 14 8 g 12%
Mix the sponge ingredients by hand, cover and ferment at room temperature (70°F/21°C) overnight, 10-12 hours. The sponge will have tripled in volume and be very bubbly.

Stage 2 sponge (Day 2, Morning):

Ingredient Grams 2x800 g loaves 1x900 g loaf Baker’s

Percentage
Stage 1 sponge 250 140 g 100%
Wholegrain rye flour 250 140 g 100%
Warm (105°F/41°C) water 250 140 g 100%
Combine the Stage 1 sponge and the Stage 2 ingredients in the mixer bowl, cover and ferment at room temperature until the dough has visibly expanded and shows cracks or broken bubbles, 1½-2 hours.

Final Dough (Day 2, Midday):

IngredientGrams 2x800 g1x940 g loaf
Stage 2 sponge750420 g
Wholegrain rye flour500281 g
Warm (105°F/41°C) water425239 g
Salt105.625

Combine the Stage 1 sponge and the Stage 2 ingredients in the mixer bowl, cover and ferment at room temperature until the dough has visibly expanded and shows cracks or broken bubbles, 1½-2 hours.

Final Dough (Day 2, Midday):

IngredientGrams 2x800 g1x940 g loaf
Stage 2 sponge750420 g
Wholegrain rye flour500281 g
Warm (105°F/41°C) water425239 g
Salt105.625

In the mixer bowl, combine the final dough ingredients and use the dough hook at low (KA2) speed to mix until fully blended into a soft, sticky dough that gathers around the hook but doesn’t leave the sides of the bowl, 5-6 minutes.
Cover the bowl and ferment at room temperature until the dough doubles in volume and shows cracks or broken bubbles, 1½-2 hours.
Turn the dough onto a well-floured work surface. Use floured hands to gently shape into a boule, then place boule seam side up in a floured linen-lined banneton or cloth-lined proofing basket. Cover and proof at room temperature until the dough has visibly expanded and shows cracks or broken bubbles, 20-30 minutes.
Preheat the oven to 445°F/230°C with the baking surface in the middle. Turn the loaf onto a well-floured peel, if using a baking stone, or a parchment-lined sheet pan.

Bake without steam for 15 minutes, then lower the temperature to 430°F/220°C and bake for an additional 15 minutes. Reduce the temperature again to 390°F/200°C and bake until the loaves thump when tapped with a finger and the internal temperature is at least 200°F/93°C, 30-40 minutes. Transfer to a rack and cool thoroughly before slicing.

 

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Benito

I wanted to see how replacing 25% of the flour with whole red fife might affect the rise and the quality of this milk bread compared to my previous recent bake.  I thought 25% was a good place to start and if this is good I’d consider increasing that whole grain portion to 50-75%.  Whole red fife is actually a nice mild whole grain flavour without any of the bitterness I associate with some whole wheats.  Although it has good gluten potential, which you can feel while doing folds during bulk, it is fermentation intolerant.  I suspect this is due to high natural amylase levels in this particular grain so I would generally avoid adding any diastatic malt to it.  Now in this bread I wasn’t too worried about gluten degradation because I fully developed the gluten upfront and I eliminated the overnight cold retard also hoping to reduce any sour tang that an overnight cold retard might add.

I included the photo above to illustrate something I’ve learned.  When you’re placing the rolls of dough into your pan, if you alternate the directions of the rolls, it can help get a better rise.  I believe it helps, have a look at my previous bake and the current one today.

 

For one loaf 9x4” Pullman pan 

 

Ingredients

 

Sweet Stiff Starter 

• 53g bread flour 

• 24g water 

• 18g light brown sugar 

• 18g sourdough starter ~100% hydration 

 

Tangzhong classic 1:5 ratio

• 89g milk 

• 18g Whole red fife flour   

 

Dough Dry Ingredients 

• (252g) bread flour or 222 g and use 30 g to mix with butter

      · 108 g whole red fife       

• 59g sugar

• 7g salt 

 

Dough Wet Ingredients 

• 149g milk (increased by 10 g for the whole wheat)

• 59g egg beaten (about 1 ⅕ of a large egg)

• 67g butter softene but do not melt.  Combine with 30 g of flour to make easier to add to dough.

 

Total flour = 431 g

 

Total weight 899 g

 

Pre-bake Wash 

• 1 egg beaten

• 1 Tbsp milk

 

Post-bake Wash 

• 1 Tbsp butter

 

Instructions

Starter 

Mix the starter ingredients in a jar or pyrex container with space for at least 50% growth.

Press down with your knuckles to create a uniform surface and to push out air. This reduces drying and allows you to see actual CO2 aeration over time.

At room temperature, it typically takes 7-9 hours for this sweet stiff levain to be at peak.

Tangzhong 

In a sauce pan set on med-low heat, whisk the milk and flour until blended. Then cook for several minutes until thickened, stirring regularly with a spoon or heat-resistant spatula. Let cool in the pan or, for faster results, in a new bowl.

 

Dough 

In the bowl of a stand mixer, briefly whisk the dry dough ingredients, and then add the sweet stiff starter, separating it into 5-6 portions as you add it to the bowl.

Now pour/scrape in all the wet ingredients (including the tangzhong), with the melted butter last. With the dough hook attachment, mix on low speed for a minute, scrape down the sides, and then mix on medium speed for 15-20 minutes. The dough will seem very soft, but as you approach the 15-20 minute mark, it should not stick to your hands and should pass the windowpane test.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, form it into a ball, flip it smooth side up, cover and let rise for 6-12 hours depending on room temperature. If you refrigerate the dough, plan for longer rise times. See photo gallery for approximate dough expansion during the bulk fermentation.  I placed the dough into the fridge to chill the dough for about 1.5 hours, this makes rolling the dough easier.

Prepare your pans by greasing them or line with parchment paper.

Scrape the dough out onto a clean counter top. Lightly flour the bench. Press the dough into a rectangle and divide it into four.  Shape each tightly into a boule, allow to rest 5 mins.  Using a rolling pin roll each ball out and then letterfold.  Turn 90* and using a rolling pin roll each out to at least 8”.  Roll each into a tight roll with some tension.  Arrange the rolls of dough inside your lined pan alternating the direction of the swirls.  This should allow a greater rise during proof and in the oven.

Cover and let proof for 2-4 hours (more if you put the dough in the refrigerator).  I proof until the top of the dough comes to within 1 cm of the top edge of the pan.

Preheat the oven to 350F and brush the dough with the egg-milk wash.

Bake the loaves for 50 minutes or until the internal temperature is at least 190F. Cover if your loaf gets brown early in the baking process.  After 50 mins remove the bread from the pan and bake a further 5 mins by placing the loaf directly in the oven on the rack.  If you loaf is super tall like mine was, I gave it another 7 mins with the oven turned off to really ensure that the side crust was firm enough to hold its shape.  You can brush the top of the loaf with butter if you wish at this point while the bread is still hot.

After the bread is completely cooled, store it in a plastic bag at room temp for a week or longer.

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Benito

This is the bread I am going to bring our friends who we are seeing for the first time in over a year.  They do seem to prefer a softer bread so what better than a sourdough Hokkaido milk bread with Tangzhong.  This is the second time I am making this bread and I hope they enjoy it.

The recipe that follows is for a 9”x4”x4” Pullman pan open.

Ingredients

 

Sweet Stiff Starter 

• 53g bread flour 

• 24g water 

• 18g light brown sugar 

• 18g sourdough starter ~100% hydration 

 

Tangzhong classic 1:5 ratio

• 89g milk (adjusted down to 1:5 ratio from original)

• 18g bread flour   

 

Dough Dry Ingredients 

• 360g bread flour or 330 g and use 30 g to mix with butter

• 59g sugar

• 7g salt 

 

Dough Wet Ingredients 

• 139g milk 

• 59g egg beaten (about 1 ⅕ of a large egg)

• 67g room temperature butter

Total flour = 431 g

 

Total weight 899 g

 

Pre-bake Wash 

• 1 egg beaten

• 1 Tbsp milk

 

Post-bake Wash 

• 1 Tbsp butter

 

Instructions

Starter 

 

Mix the starter ingredients in a jar or pyrex container with space for at least 100% growth.  At room temperature, it typically takes 7-9 hours for this sweet stiff levain to be at peak.

Tangzhong 

In a sauce pan set on med-low heat, whisk the milk and flour until blended. Then cook for several minutes until thickened, stirring regularly with a spoon or heat-resistant spatula. Let cool in the pan or, for faster results, in a new bowl.

 

In the meantime, mix butter with 30 g of flour, this will make the butter much easier to incorporate into the dough for mixing by hand or by machine.

 

 

Dough 

Mix the following in a bowl, milk, egg(s), sugar, salt, tangzhong and stiff levain to combine and dissolve/breakup the stiff levain.  Add bread flour and knead until good gluten development.  Then gradually add the butter flour mixture until fully combined and full gluten development.  The dough should pass the windowpane test.

 

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, form it into a ball, flip it smooth side up, cover and let rise for 6-12 hours depending on room temperature. If you refrigerate the dough, plan for longer rise times.  I did cold retard for 26 hours.

 

Prepare your pullman pan by greasing it or lining it with parchment paper.  Transfer the dough to the countertop and divide into four equal parts rounding each into a small boule.  One by one roll each dough ball into a long rectangle and do a letterfold.  Turn 90* then roll out again into a long rectangle.  Finally, roll into a tight roll.  Once you have rolled each dough ball into a roll place them into the pullman pan so that their swirls alternate.

 

Cover and let proof for 2-4 hours (more if you put the dough in the refrigerator).  I proof until the top of the dough comes to within 1 cm of the top edge of the pan.

 

Preheat the oven to 350ºF and brush the dough with the egg-milk wash.  Just before you place the dough into the oven brush again with the egg-milk wash.

 

Bake at 350ºF for 50 mins rotating halfway through.  Keep an eye on the crust and be prepared to shield it if it is getting too dark.  After 50 mins of baking take the bread out of the pan and place it back into the oven for another 5 mins to crisp up the crust.  Remove from oven and let cool on a rack.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

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Benito

I have previously made babkas with limited success.  My first ones had much too wet a filling and didn’t bake long enough so collapsed in the center.  My last babka we pretty successful and delicious, it was the Matcha black sesame wreath babka with yuzu glaze.  Now I love chocolate and hadn’t tried to make a chocolate one.  So this time around I thought I’d add a twist and make it raspberry chocolate.  I needed more jam anyways so decided I’m make a homemade raspberry jam, not having any pectin I thought I’d use the pectin in lemon juice to thicken the jam and also ensure a bit of extra tartness.  Despite that, I found the jam a bit too sweet so next will will use less sugar than fruit by weight to reduce the sweetness.  Regardless the jam turned out well and was perfect with the chocolate to fill the babka.

This babka recipe is by Maurizio Leo I’ve made few changes to it except that I added a small pinch of IDY because this dough can be very very slow to ferment and I didn’t want the dough to be too sour if it took that long to proof.

I did not do an overnight cold retard instead retarding only for about 1.5 hours to make the dough cooler for ease of rolling.

Vitals

Total Dough Weight

800 grams

Pre-fermented Flour

13.00%

Yield

One babka for a 9″ x 4″ x 4″ Pullman pan (without lid) or 9” cake pan for four strand braid.

Total Formula

Weight

Ingredient

Baker’s Percentage

357g

All-purpose flour (11-12% protein; King Arthur All-Purpose Flour)

100.00%

107g

Whole milk (cold from the fridge)

30.00%

107g

Large eggs (about 2, cold from the fridge, plus one more egg in reserve for the egg wash)

30.00%

100g

Unsalted butter (Kerrygold; room temperature)

28.00%

46g

Water

13.00%

29g

Caster sugar (superfine white sugar)

8.00%

8g

Salt

2.30%

46g

Sourdough starter (100% hydration)

13.00

 

Dough Mix

My final dough temperature for this dough was 76°F (24°C).

Weight

Ingredient

310 g 

All-purpose flour (11-12% protein; King Arthur All-Purpose Flour)

107 g

Whole milk (cold from the fridge)

107 g

Large eggs (about 2; cold from the fridge)

100 g

Unsalted butter (Kerrygold; room temperature)

29 g

Caster sugar (superfine white sugar)

8 g

Salt

138 g

Mature, but mild, levain

2. Mix

Before mixing, take out the butter called for in the recipe and cut it into 1/2″ pats. Let it sit at room temperature until called for.

I used my KitchenAid stand mixer to mix this dough. To the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, add the mature levain, flour, whole milk, large eggs, salt, and half of the sugar. Set the mixer to low and mix until everything is incorporated. Let the dough rest, uncovered, for 10 minutes.

After the 10 minute rest, turn the mixer up to medium and mix for 5 minutes until the dough starts to pull from the sides of the mixing bowl. At this point, slowly stream in the remaining sugar while the mixer is running. Mix for another 1-2 minutes until the dough comes back together.

With the mixer still set to medium, add the room temperature butter, one pat at a time, waiting to add the next until the previous is absorbed into the dough. It might take around 5 minutes to mix all the butter into the dough. After all of the butter is added, continue mixing for another few minutes until the dough smooths out and once again begins to cling to the dough hook. The dough should be almost fully developed at this point (it won’t completely pass the windowpane test, but almost).

Transfer the dough to a container for bulk fermentation, cover, and keep somewhere warm—78-80°F (26-27°C)—in your kitchen for bulk fermentation.

3. Warm Bulk Fermentation – 2 hours. (or longer, as needed)

During this time, give the dough 2 sets of stretch and folds where the first set is 30 minutes after the beginning of bulk fermentation and the second set is 30 minutes after the first. After the second set, let the dough rest, covered, until the next step.

4. Cold Bulk Fermentation – (next day)

Assess the dough: has it risen a little in the bowl during the warm bulk fermentation? It should be a little puffy and smoothed out. If it looks like there’s no activity at all, give the dough another 30 minutes to 1 hour and check again.

Once you see some rise in the dough, place the covered bulk fermentation bowl into the refrigerator overnight.

Same day option: 

I much prefer making this over the course of two days, but you could make this all in one day: let the dough finish bulk fermentation for 2-3 hours on the counter. When the dough has risen around 50% and feels puffy, proceed with the rest of the steps below. However, I do recommend placing the dough in the fridge for at least 1 hour after this warm bulk fermentation to chill before rolling out!

5. Roll, freeze, cut, and shape 

Before taking the dough out of the refrigerator, make the fillings, if making jam prepare a day ahead to allow it to cool.

Divide the dough into two, shape tightly into balls.

On a lightly floured surface roll one dough ball into large rectangle 16” x 12”, first spread half of the jam, cocoa, butter mixture on, then sprinkle half of the chopped chocolate sugar mixture.  Roll into a tight roll then transfer onto a cookie tray.  Repeat for the other dough.

Important: 

Place the rolled-up log on a baking sheet and place it into the freezer for 15 minutes (this makes it much easier to cut and braid).

 

After the 15-minute freezer rest, take the baking sheet out of the freezer and return the dough log to the counter. Using a sharp knife, cut the log to split open the log from one side to the other. Pinch the two top halves together and braid the dough one strand over the other. At the bottom, pinch the two halves together again. Don’t worry if filling spills out or things get messy — it’s all good.

After the dough is braided, pick up the braid and place it on the parchment right in the middle, then pick up the sides of the parchment and lift the dough up and drop it into the pan.

Cover the pan and place it somewhere warm, ideally, 78-80°F (26-27°C), to proof.

6. Proof 

This dough can be slow to rise at this point. Give it the time it needs to rise up to about 1/2″ below the rim of the Pullman pan. For me, at 78°F (26°C), it took about 3.5 hours. See the image below for how high my dough filled my pan.

7. Bake 

Preheat your oven with the rack in the middle to 350°F (176°C) — no fan assist (no convection). When the oven is preheated and the babka dough is fully proofed, place the pan on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper (to catch any sugar spilling over). In a small bowl, whisk together one whole egg and 1 Tbsp water and brush a thin layer of the egg wash on the top of the dough. Then, slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake for 55  minutes until the center of the babka reaches 200°F (93°C) then leave in oven with the oven off for another 5 mins.. Keep an eye on the babka in the last 10 minutes of the bake, if it’s coloring too quickly drop the temperature to compensate.

 

Once out of the oven brush a layer of the raspberry syrup on the babka.

 

Raspberry Jam

400 g frozen raspberries

425 g sugar (should reduce a bit more still very sweet)

½ lemon juice

Mash together raspberries and sugar in a saucepan on medium heat.  On sugar dissolved add juice of ½ lemon.  Gradually bring to a boil.  The jam should reach 221ºF for the pectin in the lemon juice to thicken the jam if not using jam sugar.

 

For the Filling 

  • 3/16 cup raspberry jam
  • 1 tbsp. cocoa powder
  • 1 tbsp. unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 4 oz. 113.4 g bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped 
  • ⅛ cup sugar

Syrup

 

  • 1⁄8  cup sugar
  • ½ cup fresh raspberries, mashed
  • 1 tbsp water

Make the filling: 

Combine jam and cocoa powder in a small bowl; using your fingers, add butter until moist and crumbly and set jam mixture aside. Combine chocolate and 1⁄8 cup sugar in a bowl; set chocolate mixture aside.

 

The jam mixture is the first to be spread on the rolled out dough, then the chocolate sugar mixture is sprinkled on top.

 

Make the syrup: 

 

Combine raspberries, remaining 1⁄8 cup sugar, and 1 tbsp. water in a 2-qt. saucepan over high; reduce heat and simmer until sugar has dissolved, 1–2 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand 10 minutes; strain through a fine mesh sieve, discarding solids

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Benito

This is a 60% whole Kamut 80% hydration sourdough loaf I put together testing what I believe works well for pH guided dough development.

Because I didn’t do an overnight saltolyse I did add 0.5% (2.48g) diastatic malt to the dough at the time of wet aultolyse.  By wet autolyse I mean I mix all the water with all the whole Kamut and diastatic malt without the salt, bread flour or levain.  The idea here is that I want to quickly hydrate the bran while also making it easier to add the stiff levain to this 1 hour later.  I believe this is working well for me although this bake is just the second time trying it.

The overnight levain was cool room temperature fermented with a low hydration of 60% to ensure that it wasn’t overfermented by the morning.  The pH of the levain at the time of use was 4.04 and had risen almost 4x.

After the 1 hour wet autolyse I added the levain and salt mixing it in the wet batter like slurry of the dough.  Once well incorporated which took like time, I add the bread flour and mixed until no dry flour remained.  After a ten minute rest I reassessed the dough and added the hold back water and mixed.  After another ten minute rest slap and folds were done to moderate gluten development (700).  pH at this point was 5.42

At 30 minute intervals first a bench letter fold was done, then three coil folds until the dough felt strong and wasn’t relaxing.  This was done at warm room temperature of around 78-80ºF.  Bulk was ended at a pH of 4.47 corresponding to an aliquot rise of 50% and the dough was shaped and placed into a banneton and left to ferment further until a pH of 4.07 was reached.  At this time the aliquot jar showed >90% rise.  The dough was then placed in a 3ºC fridge and left to cold retard for 20.5 hours.  

The next day (19.5 hours later) the oven was preheated to 500ºF with the dutch oven inside.  After 1 hour when the oven was up to 500ºF the dough was removed from the banneton onto a sheet of parchment.  The pH at this point was 3.97 using my automatic temperature control pH meter.  Some of the rice flour was brushed off and the dough was scored.  The dough was transferred to the dutch oven and baked as usual.  20 mins at 450ºF lid on, then 10 mins 420ºF, then lid off 15 mins 420ºF.  

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Benito

This is the index for the bakes that I have posted in my blog.  I will keep it updated as I add new recipes or bakes.  The newest bakes will be at the top of the list.

80% Whole Grain Sourdough

Black Sesame Yorkville Sourdough Baguettes

Purple Sweet Potato Black Sesame Sourdough Pumpkin

Tourte de Seigle

25% Whole Red Fife Hokkaido Sourdough Milk Bread

Sourdough Hokkaido Milk Bread

Raspberry Chocolate Braided Sourdough Babka

60% Whole Kamut Sourdough

Blueberry Miso Crumble Cake

Tiger Stripe Neapolitan Ice Cream Sourdough

Danish Sourdough Rye - Southern Ground - Jennifer Lapidus

Seven Grain Porridge Sprouted Whole Wheat

Sourdough Ciabattas again

King Arthur yeasted burger buns

Blueberry Rhubarb Pie with Whole Red Fife Pastry

Brandy soaked blueberry toasted walnut spelt sourdough

Yorkville Sourdough Baguettes

Speck, Parmigiana Reggiano, Peach and Arugula Sourdough Pizza

pH guided dough development and baking decisions

Whole Einkorn Whole Red Fife Sourdough

Black and white sesame seed encrusted Yorkville Sourdough Baguettes

Hokkaido sourdough milk bread

100% semolina black and white sesame seed 83% hydration sourdough

Kamut Sourdough Baguettes 75% hydration

100% Semolina Black and White Sesame Seed Bee Striped Sourdough 81% hydration

Sun dried tomato pesto sourdough knots

Quadruple seeded country sourdough - pH and aliquot guided

Country Sourdough - aliquot jar and pH correlates

Marinated vegetables and mussels sourdough pizza

Purple Sweet Potato Black Sesame Tiger Stripe Sourdough Milk Bread

Triple seeded country sourdough

Miso Nori Sourdough

Black Sesame Seed Country Sourdough

Quadruple Seeded Country Sourdough

Matcha Anko Swirl Sourdough Milk Bread

Shisaido black sesame sourdough

Ichigo Daifuku (Strawberry Mochi)

Lemon Sugar Sourdough Rolls with Yuzu Vanilla Cream Cheese Icing

100% whole stoneground red fife take five!

Sesame Sourdough

Yuzu Lemon Cake

Sourdough Cha Siu Bao 叉燒麵包

Purple Sweet Potato Black Sesame Swirl Sourdough Milk Bread

100% whole red fife sourdough

10% Whole Kamut Sourdough Baguettes

Lazy 29% Whole Rye Sourdough Poppyseed Crusted Sandwich Loaf

Anko, Black Sesame Swirl Sourdough Milk Bread

100% whole wheat honey sourdough

Quadruple Seeded Country Sourdough

Southern Living Carrot Cake

Black Sesame 100% whole stoneground red fife sourdough

Strawberry Rhubarb Cobbler

Greek Sourdough Focaccia take two

40% whole Kamut 40% whole spelt sourdough

Greek Sourdough Focaccia

75% whole stoneground red fife honey sourdough 85% hydration

Matcha, Black Sesame, Swirl Sourdough Milk Bread

Sour Cherry Raspberry Pie and half Palmiers

Black Sesame 40% Whole Kamut 85% hydration Sourdough Loaf

Irish Mist Soaked Sour Cherry Hazelnut Chocolate Chunk Cocoa Sourdough

Seven Grain Sourdough

Rum Soaked Apricot Toasted Walnut Sourdough

Sourdough Pizza

Benny’s Country Sourdough 80% hydration

Purple Sweet Potato Black Sesame Sourdough 84.5% hydration

Semolina CB - Benny’s Bakes

Matcha Black Sesame Sourdough Babka Wreath with Yuzu Glaze

Six Grain Sourdough (my riff on Hammelman’s Five Grain)

Maggie Glezer’s Sourdough Challah

My First Sourdough Focaccia

Red Miso Furikake (Sesame seeds and Nori) Sourdough

Poppyseed Crusted Yorkville Sourdough Baguettes

Rum Soaked Cranberry Walnut Sourdough

Cardamon Sourdough Sticky Rolls

Poppyseed crusted Tangzhong Purple Sweet Potato Sandwich Loaf

Pompe å L’Huile

Cranberry Apple Rum Spiced Christmas Cake

Black Sesame Red Fife Sourdough

Sesame Seed Crusted Semolina Sourdough Baguettes

Eric’s Poppyseed NY Deli Rye Bread

Cranberry Orange Walnut Sourdough Babka

Tangzhong Sesame Seed Crusted Sourdough Sandwich Bread

Multigrain Sourdough Mini MIche

Sesame seed Crusted Purple Sweet Potato Sourdough Sandwich Bread

Poppyseed Crusted Purple Sweet Potato Sourdough Sandwich Bread

Ciabattas for CB

Country Sourdough Experiment No. 2

Marinated Vegetables, Pecorino Romano Cheese Sourdough Pizza

Chocolate Bouabsa Baguettes

Country Sourdough attempt No. 1

Poppyseed crusted Yorkville Sourdough Baguettes No. 2

Purple Sweet Potato Black Sesame Sourdough

Anis Bouabsa Sesame Seed Baguettes

Sundried Tomato Shallot Herbs de Provence Sourdough Boule

Poppy Seed Crusted Yorkville Baguettes

Cinnamon Spiced Rum Raisin Sourdough

Yellow Miso Furikake Sourdough

Sesame Semolina Sourdough Baguettes Set No. 2

Butter Mashed Potato Rosemary Black Pepper Sourdough

Sesame Semolina Baguettes au Levain no. 1

Kamut Sourdough 30%

Blueberry Rhubarb lattice crust pie

20% Kamut sourdough

Baguettes au Levain set no. 15

Blueberry Rhubarb Galette

Red Miso Toasted Black and White Sesame Seed Sourdough

Homemade Miso

13th set of baguettes au levain

Nectarine Blueberry Galette with all butter crust

Koji Rice Porridge Sourdough

25% Whole Red Fife Sourdough

Red Miso Furikake Sourdough

20% Kamut Sourdough

Einkorn Red Fife Sourdough No. 4

Einkorn Red Fife Sourdough No. 3

Einkorn Red Fife Sourdough Batard No. 2

Spelt, Red Fife and Rye Sourdough

Marinated Artichoke Olive Sourdough Pizza

My second set of baguettes

My first baguettes

Furikake 振り掛け / ふりかけ Sourdough Discard Crackers

Black and White Sesame Seed Sourdough

Sourdough Buttermilk Cheddar Biscuits - Recipe for Discard

Butterfly Pea Flower Sourdough

Tuna, Artichoke, Sun-dried Tomato, Onion, Mozzarella Sourdough Pizza

Smoked Cheddar Apple Sourdough

Double Olive Walnut Herbes de Provence Sourdough

Purple Sweet Potato Pecan Einkorn Sourdough No. 2

Scallion Sourdough Biscuits (using sourdough discard)

Purple Sweet Potato Pecan Einkorn Sourdough

Sweet Potato Walnut Pecan Einkorn Sourdough

Einkorn, Red Fife Sourdough No. 1

Spelt Red Fife Rye Soudough No. 4

Spelt, Rye and Red Fife Sourdough No. 3

Spelt, Red Fife and Rye Sourdough No. 2

Spelt, Red Fife and Rye Sourdough

Hamelman’ a Five Grain Sourdough

Cranberry Walnut Sourdough

Hawaiian Sourdough Pizza

Sourdough Pain de Mie Maurizio’s Recipe

74% hydration soughdough

Cranberry Apple Bourbon Pie

Adjusting my methods for Sourdough loaf

Bravetart Apple Pie

Beginner’s Sourdough - Another time

Maurizio’s Beginner’s Sourdough - Again

Olive and Artichoke Marinade Sourdough Pizza

Sourdough Pizza - Balsamic Marinated Arugula, tomatoes, egg and avocado

Sesame and Flax Sourdough Crackers

Sunburst Bourbon Peach Melba Pie

Maurizio’s “Beginner Sourdough”

Seeded Sourdough

Tomato Sourdough Bread

Grana Padano Sesame Sourdough Crackers

Plumcot Ginger Pie with Whole Red Fife Crust

40% Whole Red Fife Sourdough

Sourdough Seed Culture

 

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Benito

To celebrate my 365 d fermented homemade red miso I decided to try something I’ve never done before.  For ages I’ve seen recipes that use some miso in desserts so I decided to make this crumble cake that uses miso in the crumble topping.  Instead of the white miso is substituted my red miso and because it is much stronger than white I used only 2 tbsp of it in the crumble topping.  

If you’re curious about how to make miso from scratch this is the link to my post from a year ago.

 

CRUMBLE

¾ cup (94 g) whole wheat flour

½ cup (packed; 100 g) light brown sugar

4 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted

3 Tbsp. white miso

CAKE

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted, slightly cooled, plus more for pan

1¾ cups (219 g) whole wheat flour, plus more for pan

1½ tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. kosher salt

¼ tsp. baking soda

2 large eggs

1 cup (packed; 200 g) light brown sugar

1 cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt

1 tsp. vanilla extract

1 pint blueberries

(Zest of 1 lemon - my addition)

 

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: A 9"- spring form pan 

 

CRUMBLE Mix whole wheat flour, brown sugar, butter, and miso in a small bowl to combine. Set aside.

CAKE Preheat oven to 350°. Butter pan, then lightly dust with whole wheat flour, tapping out excess. Whisk baking powder, salt, baking soda, and 1¾ cups whole wheat flour in a large bowl to combine. Whisk eggs, brown sugar, and yogurt in a medium bowl to combine. Add vanilla and 1 cup butter; whisk just to incorporate. Using a rubber spatula, mix in dry ingredients, being careful not to overmix, then gently fold in blueberries. Scrape batter into prepared pan and spread out evenly. Top with reserved crumble.

Bake cake, checking after 30 minutes and tenting with foil if crumble is getting very dark (some color is fine), until a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 60–70 minutes. Let cake cool in pan at least 2 hours (so it firms up and is easier to slice).

 

DO AHEAD: Cake can be baked 3 days ahead. Store tightly wrapped at room temperature.

 

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