The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Recent Blog Entries

  • Pin It
isand66's picture
isand66

 The last batch of rolls I made were very rich so I wanted to make something a bit more lean this time.  I omitted the cream cheese and changed up some of the flours and used whole eggs and olive oil in place of the cream cheese and butter.

They came out very tasty and while not as rich and buttery as the last batch, they still make great burger buns and sandwich rolls as well.

DSC_0045

DSC_0056

Formula

Egg Multigrain Rolls (%)

Egg Multigrain Rolls (weights)

Download the BreadStorm formula here.

DSC_0051

 

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

About 10 minutes before you are ready to mix the flours and water, add the dehydrated shallots (onions work just as well) to the water to re-hydrate them.

Mix the flours and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  After 30 minutes or so  add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), eggs and olive oil and mix on low for 6 minutes.    Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape into rolls around 125 -130 grams each.  Cover the rolls with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap Sprayed with cooking spray and let rise at room temperature for 1 1/2 - 2 hours.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, apply an egg wash if desired and sprinkle on your toppings.  Next add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 425 degrees.  Bake for 25 minutes or until the rolls are nice and brown.

Take the rolls out of the oven when done and let them cool on a bakers rack for as long as you can resist.

DSC_0053

DSC_0076

DSC_0082

Ru007's picture
Ru007

This week’s bake is a continuation of last week’s idea of taking loaves I’ve made before and upping the whole grain content. The fig, almond and sunflower seed SD I made I while back was next on the list, last time it was 20% whole grain.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/45693/fig-and-almond-sd

This time I used pecans instead of almonds and sunflower seeds, because I found that the flavour of the almonds was a bit lost.

 Formula:

 

 

 

Weight    (g)

 

%

 

Final dough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain

 

150

 

 

37%

 

 

 

Water

 

300

 

 

74%

 

367

75%

Flour

 

405

 

 

100%

 

488

100%

Unbleached white bread flour

285

 

 

70%

 

 

285

58%

Whole grain flour

120

 

 

30%

 

 

203

42%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

 

10

 

 

2.5%

 

10

2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toasted Pecans

 

50

 

 

12%

 

50

10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figs (dry weight)

 

60

 

 

15%

 

60

12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total dough weight

 

975

 

 

 

 

975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prefermented flour

17%

 

 

 

 

 

1. 3 stage levain build from 6g of my NMNF rye starter using whole grain flour. The starter was refrigerated the night before mixing day.

2. Mix flours and water and chill in the fridge for a few hours before allowing to come to room temperature overnight.

3. Two hours before mixing, take levain out of fridge, stir down and allow to bubble up a bit.

4. Mix levain into the rest of the dough along with the salt and allow the dough to rest for 15mins.

5. I did 4 S&Fs , with 45mins in between each one.

I added the toasted chopped toasted pecans  and figs (which had been soaked in hot water for a few minutes before chopping up) on the 3rd fold.

6. I left the the dough to bulk ferment for 3 hours undisturbed, at which point it looked nicely risen and bubbly.

7. I preshaped the loaf, and rested it for 30mins before shaping and placing the dough in a rice floured basket. I let the dough proof for a little over an hour before putting it into the fridge for 19hours. The dough came out of the fridge an hour before baking.

8. Baked the loaf at 230dC, for 30mins with steam and 20mins without steam. 

The flavour of the figs and the pecans together is really great. The sweetness of the figs and the nuttiness of the pecans makes it like a gourmet PB&J, kind of…

The crumb is moist and tender with a bit of chewiness too.

Overall, I’m pleased with this one. I liked it the first time, but i like this one better :)

Happy baking :)

 

dennis77666's picture
dennis77666

Please email me the Alan Scott brick oven plans. Thank you,

Dennis

Email is dennis77666@yahoo.com

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Usually Lucy comes up with a recipe and tells me what to do and then I do my best to execute her recipe wishes as closely as possible or risk having my ankles savaged by a wild beast, small in leg length.  Then I tell you all about it.  This time was a bit different.

Lucy put everything together and she said …..‘OK Master, what kind of bread is this and how was it made?  It’s time to find out if you know your stuff or not or at least to know it well enough to know it when you see it.  Then she showed me the photos and said take your best shot at guessing what this is.

I have to admit that I didn’t do as well as I thought I would but I also thought you all might be better at figuring this out as a group.  So here goes.

What kind of bread is this? What kind of grains and flour were used.  Is it SD?  How was the levain made? Was it autolysed? Was it retarded?   What is the hydration? What is that add-in? How was it made?  Now knowing Lucy helps a lot and watching her recipes over the last several years is full of hints and answers.  So good luck with it.

I’ve decided to pair it with homemade, smoked pastrami that is currently on the smoker for the 4th of July Holiday – Yum!  Happy Birthday America!

 

 

 

varda's picture
varda

Some may remember that I put out a call for interns to visit my bakery Bread Obsession this summer.   I am sad to say that no interns applied.  First, we got a lovely visit from exceedingly accomplished baker, Pat Roth, which she wrote about so eloquently here.  Then a couple of weeks ago, Alfanso showed up on our doorstep and proceeded to work alongside us for several weeks, with such zest and verve and talent and experience that I could hardly call him an intern - the better term would be visiting baker.   

Here he is shaping one of our standbys - Flaxseed Rye

and Multigrain Sunflower loaves...

A few of the final product are pictured above.

Alan noted that our big mixer had a tendency to walk around the room when it got going.   We have been wracking our brains trying to figure out how to solve this, but none of our attempts worked.   Alan looked things over, and came up with a simple and ingenious solution:   he epoxied little brackets to the floor.   Lo and behold, no more mixer stalking out into the middle of the room.  

It was so great to have him visit.  We miss him already.

Varda

www.breadobsession.com

facebook.com/breadobsession

instagram.com/breadobsession

isand66's picture
isand66

    It's been a while since I baked with a Yeast Water starter and I now that cherries are in season and inexpensive I figured it was time to build one again.

It took a few days to bring the YW to life with a handful of cherries, water and a little honey.  Once it was ready to use I built up a levain in 2 stages and used a nice combination of flours including freshly milled whole wheat and durum flour.

Naturally I needed to add some cherries to the main dough and figured some walnuts would make this a winner.

The final dough turned out great with a nice soft semi open crumb chock full of cherries and walnuts.

DSC_0114

Cherry Walnut Yeast Water Bread (%)

Cherry Walnut Yeast Water Bread (weights)

Download BreadStorm .BUN file here.

DSC_0121

DSC_0112

Levain Build 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Levain Build 2

Add the ingredients for Build 2 and mix until smooth.  Let is sit at room temperature until doubled around 4-5 hours.  You can then either use it immediately or refrigerate it for a day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the main dough water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain,  and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes and then add in the cherries and walnuts and mix for one additional minute.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but  manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.   Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

DSC_0137
Lot's of Walnuts and Cherries!

DSC_0138

DSC_0063
Assorted Cone Flowers (Echinacea)
DSC_0072
Cone Flower
DSC_0075
Oriental Lilly
Cedar Mountain's picture
Cedar Mountain

Again with the copious amounts of material generated tending a healthy, active starter...what to do with it, what can I do with it?  Well, today I thought it would be interesting to try something different (for me) and I tried baking some brioche buns.  Knowing nothing about how to make brioche I went online to explore the many and various ways to make these buns. Most of the recipes I looked at seemed to have pretty much the same basic ingredients, all of them used yeast.  I decided to try making brioche with sourdough starter instead of adding yeast. So, here is what I cobbled together using basic brioche ingredients and my starter; I make no claim to this being an original recipe as much as an experiment!

I used a Kitchen Aid stand mixer to make the dough - I first mixed 1 and 1/2 cups room temperature whole milk; 2 tablespoons unrefined sugar; 1/3 cup melted unsalted butter; 1 large egg; 4 tablespoons sourdough starter; 1 teaspoon sea salt and then added 3 and 1/2 cups flour (1 cup fresh milled red fife; the rest all purpose unbleached white flour).  I let this mix for about 15 minutes and then covered the mixing bowl and left it at room temperature for a few hours. I wasn't sure what to expect in terms of rise but after a few hours the dough had expanded a little bit, was still a bit sticky but nice and stretchy. I divided the dough into balls and flattened them slightly (I was thinking hamburger buns) and set them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper; I covered them with plastic wrap and left them to rise for another 3 hours at room temperature.  By the time I was ready to bake they had risen back to more of a rounded ball shape than hamburger buns but I didn't want to de-gas them by trying to press them flatter again...so a little egg/water whisked together, washed over each bun, a sprinkle of mixed seeds and into a preheated 425 F oven. My oven is running a little hot so the buns baked pretty fast and were nicely golden brown after 10 minutes.  They're not the most uniform shape/size buns but I think they're quite adequate for hamburgers.  Happy Canada Day!

 

MIchael_O's picture
MIchael_O

I was reading how knowledge has become ubiquitous. The shear mass of information makes knowing factual information not that valuable. The reason I was thinking about this topic is because I thought I had discovered something completely new. But the problem with new ideas is that they are doubted, so after thinking I decided to use the ideas to make something. Now I have a little thing called Recipe Genius that is the only recipe calculator that actually tells you the recipe you entered.

I am not a web designer but I tried to make the site attractive over the last time I provided updates on this site.

 

I have more baking tools to come. Some really interesting ones :)

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

Decided to try out a new stone in the grill. First test, of course, bread. 

Made a simple dough for safety, about 30% rye and tossed it on. Always need to re-learn the technique every year, but I think this stone is going to work just fine.

 

 

Cedar Mountain's picture
Cedar Mountain

Over my very brief experience baking bread I have come to appreciate and respect the many variables that can and do affect the outcome of a bread bake...some loaves turn out despite my abuse, some are a disappointment despite lavishing care and attention to detail on them, some I have no idea what it is that made them as they are!  But that's why I so enjoy baking bread...it's never the same, never absolutely predictable, always a challenge.  Most recently, the weather around here has started to heat up as summer gets underway, the kitchen is usually around 25 C by the afternoon. Of course this has a big impact on my starter and any dough I have fermenting or proofing...I am being tested now on whether or not I have learned anything over the past winter/spring about the various stages of my dough, how intuitive (or not) I am in working with the variables (temperature, humidity being the most obvious right now). I have learned that I have to focus on keeping my dough warm as in the winter/spring or cooling it as in the summer to maintain optimum temperatures for the levain to do its thing (77-80 F seems to produce the best results for me). So with that in mind, today (outside temperature is a very pleasant 24 C, sunny, humidity about 72%) I baked what has become a favourite of mine, Oat Porridge Sourdough Bread.  

Again, I used Chad Robertson's Master Recipe from Tartine No. 3 as the basis for my bread. I mixed a 300 g combination of fresh milled spelt (50 g), rye (50 g), hard spring wheat (100 g) and a grain cereal blend containing barely, oats, rye, buckwheat, spelt, emmer (100 g) with 750 g unbleached white flour; mixed with 750 g water (80 F) and autolysed for 1 hour.  Then I added 25 g sea salt and 225 g of very young levain (3 hours old, very bubbly and active) and started the bulk fermentation at room temperature (23 C to start; 25 C by the end). After the first fold I added an oat porridge mixture (100 g toasted oats plus 200 g boiling water; covered and soaked for 2 hours; then added 50 g coarsely cracked toasted sesame seeds) being very careful to gently fold and incorporate into the dough. I am not sure about the exact hydration at this point but given the 750 g water in the autolyse and 200 g water in the oat porridge it was somewhere around 85% + at least; the dough did not feel overly wet, probably because of the fresh milled grain flours and oat/sesame seed mixture, and was very extensible, elastic after finishing 6 folds, each series of folds 30 minutes apart .  The dough temperature was 82 F to start and 78 F after 3 hours.  The dough had risen 30 % after 5 1/4 hours (this slightly longer than the 4 hours Robertson states; probably due to the very young levain)

The dough felt very billowy and full; I did not bother with a bench rest, shaped the loaves and put them into baskets to proof at room temperature (25 C) for 1 hour and then retarded in the fridge overnight.  Total proof time was about 10 hours.  I baked them in combo cookers on an oven stone, covered at 500 F for 20 minutes; 450 F for 10 minutes then uncovered at 450 F for 18 minutes.  I am having some issues with my gas oven and today it must have been cycling on the hot side as you see from the pictures. The crust is very dark, too much for my aesthetic sensibilities but it tastes pretty good so I guess it's ok for today.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages

Subscribe to Recent Blog Entries