The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

JL No Knead Olive Bread

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rolls's picture
rolls

JL No Knead Olive Bread

This was really easy to make and tasted amazing! from Jim Lahey's My Bread, although, I added salt and didn't depend on the saltiness of the olives like he said in the recipe, and mine did need it :)

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has anyone tried baking from a cool pot and oven? i tried it as an experiment with his orginal recipe and bread was great although a bit flatter, not sure whether this was due to it sticking a bit to cloth and thus deflating a little or because it was wetter than usual :)

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

pictures/URLs

 

rolls's picture
rolls

how strange, its showing on my screen, perhaps because i did a copy and paste, i don't know how to upload them, never works with me. sorry. wish you could see them, lol.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

and check my how-to post with screen shots.  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20338/posting-photosi-know-i-know

Best,

Anna

 

rolls's picture
rolls

Thanks just had a look will giv it a try. So no pics showing at all? How strange it's worked that way for me before

bill bush's picture
bill bush

I have learned everything I know about baking from Lahey and this site.  Not that I know bunches or even remember to use it all, but I can now bake a loaf that is far ahead of "artisan" loaves from ordinary grocery stores.

You posted about using a cool pot, which I have now done three times with the no-knead technique.  It has worked well for me, and today I had my best bake ever using it.  I wanted to do an olive loaf to use up some (about a cup) marinated olives a friend had given me because he found them too oily, and I had a 4x4 slice of pepper jack about 1/4 inch thick to use up, too.  So of course since wretched excess is my go-to technique I added the finely ground fresh leaves of a 12-inch sprig of fresh rosemary.  

I started with doubling the standard recipe, or so I thought.  I put the olives (sliced in thirds), the cheese (diced 1/4 inch  cubes) and the rosemary (pulverized to sand-fineness in a mini-processor attachment to my hand blender) and the flour into a large bowl, mindlessly neglecting to tare out the bowl weight on my digital scale.  When I added the water, I had soup, not the classic shaggy mess of dough I knew to expect.  Then it hit me that I had neglected to tare out bowl weight!  So I weighed a bowl of similar size and construction, added that much flour and stirred it in.  Still a little too wet, so I added another 1/3 cup of flour and decided the texture was about right.  I was now up to about 950 grams of flour, but I have made this bread so often that I can recognize a correct dough.  That says a lot for the frequently-given advice on this site to master a basic recipe.  I would have been at a complete loss if I had not familiarized myself  with no-knead over the past year.  I let the dough sit in the mixing bowl with a plate over it for 17 hours, by which time it was springing back about 50% when I finger-poked it.  That seemed like optimal rising to me, so I dumped it on a well-floured board and did one gentle tri-fold, then pulled it into a boule and placed it in a cold dutch oven lined with baking parchment (second use for this sheet) and set it near a sunny window to rise loosely covered for a while.  After 100 minutes it was coming back about 90% from a finger-poke, so I made six cuts with cooking scissors (scoring just doesn't work for me), put on the lid and popped it into the pre-heated 500-degree oven for 35 minutes, then took the lid off, dropped heat to 450 degrees for 30 minutes and got the biggest, best-risen loaf ever!  

The cold oven approach is certainly less dramatic, less dangerous, and equally satisfactory in results.  When it gets cool I'll get the final answer, but judging from past experience, this has worked out well.

 

You mentioned flattening because of sticking to the cloth.  I find the cloth business disastrous with this wet dough.  It has not worked for me, so I just let the dough rise for its first rise in the mixing bowl after I'm done stirring.  Then I do a gentle stretch and fold and shape to boule before placing the boule on parchment in the pot it will be cooked in for cold-pot cooking, or just put it on parchment and lift by parchment to place into a rising container the same size as the pot it will be cooked in if using hot-pot technique.

I can't see your photos, and have never learned to upload my own, but I hope my experience/comments helps you.  I certainly think Bittman/Lahey have helped inspire me, and The Fresh Loaf has given me depth of field understanding that no one book or video can provide.  BTW, I add salt, too.  Mike Ruhlman's new book TWENTY has opened my eyes on salt, to the point that I now encourage people to do a simple taste-off between regular table salt and any ordinary sea salt.  There is a world of difference!

Happy Baking

 

 

taurus430's picture
taurus430

I made a loaf of no knead olive bread last week using the Artisan Bread in 5 method, but I'm a follower of Jim Lahey. I cut a hunk of dough off from the fridge, managed to roll it out as it's easier to work with when cold. The bread came out ok but I think is was still to cold and should have let it warm up more. Kind of dense. I have to try the cold pot method. I'm so use to dropping the dough in a hot cast iron pot, but for this I used parchment paper. It proofed in parchment paper in a banneton. I cannot upload pics either, maybe to big.

Rob