The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,


Wanted to share with you something that I have been working on for the past 2 days or so.  I was poking around my local Gristede's supermarket the other day and found Hodgson Mills Stoneground Rye Flour for $5.99.  I usually only go to Gristede's if I'm lazy or desperate as there are much better places to get groceries in NYC.  Anyway, I was pleasantly surprised to find what I did.  Also, I have some organic spelt berries that I'm trying to get rid of or use as it's not my favorite grain.  So, when I got home I consulted Hamelman's Bread book along with the Hofpfisterei München website looking for some inspiration.  I found the following.  If you click on the links on their website as follows: Sortiment => Natursaurteigbrote => Pfister-Oko-Dinkel-Grunkern-Volkorn...  It's a 92% spelt(dinkel) and 8% rye(roggen) bread...  I was inspired by this, but did the complete opposite and thought it was a 92% rye bread...  Anyways, my inspiration doesn't need to be correct, right?


Anyways, back to the 90% rye/ 10% spelt bread that I'm making.  I've tried to make a very detailed photo documentation for all of you.  So here goes!


This is what started it all.  The Hodgson Mill Rye Flour I found at the local Gristede's around the block from me.  $5.99 for 5 pounds.  Not a bad find...



My recipe page 1



My recipe page 2



8/25/10 - Stage 1 (Freshening)


16g Rye Flour


24g Water


8g Sourdough Starter (100% Hydration)


48g Total


7:00pm - Mix all, cover, let rest for 5 hours.



8/26/10 - Stage 2 (Basic Sour)


100g Rye Flour


78g Water


48g All of stage 1


226g Total


12:00am - Mix all, cover, let rest for approx 17 hours.



Stage 2 after mixing a bit



Stage 2 smoothed over with water before covering and letting rest for 17 hrs.



Stage 2 after approx 17 hrs



Stage 2 after approx 17 hrs - detail of what's inside



8/26/10 - Stage 3 (Full Sour)


270g Rye Flour


270g Water


226g All of stage 2


766g Total


6:45pm - Mix all, cover, let rest for approx 3-4 hours



Stage 3 mixed



Stage 3 smoothed over with water before covering and resting



Hand grinding spelt grains for final dough with a hand crank grain mill



Spelt flour close up out of the hand crank mill



Stage 3 after 3 1/2 hrs



Stage 3 side view - gas bubbles



Stage 3 - inside texture



8/26/10 - Final Dough


514g Rye Flour


100g Spelt Flour (freshly ground)


408g Water


18g Kosher Salt


766g All of stage 2


1806g Total


9:15pm - Mix all, cover, bulk ferment for 20 minutes.



Stage 3 in pieces in large mixing bowl with pre-measured amount of water



All ingredients of final dough in mixing bowl



Mixing with rubber spatula



More mixing



More mixing and mushing...  Just mix well so everything is well combined...



For nice ball with spatula, smooth over with water...



Place in plastic bag, bulk ferment for 20 minutes...



Final dough after 20 minute bulk ferment



Inside texture of dough after bulk ferment



9:45pm - Divide dough into 2 equal weight pieces



Form into boule, dusting lightly with rye flour to prevent sticking



Place in linen lined baskets for proofing



Place in baskets in plastic bag for proofing, approx 1 hr.  Place baking stone on 2nd rack up from bottom, place steam tray, preheat oven to 550F with convection.



Boules after proofing.  Notice cracks on surface.



Close up of cracks



Turn out on to peel



Dock loaf with chopstick



10:50pm - Turn off convection.  Place loaves directly on baking stone, add 1 cup water to steam pan, close oven door.  Turn oven temp to 500F and bake for 10 minutes without convection.  Then remove the steam pan, turn oven down to 410F and bake for another 60 minutes or until internal temp of loaf reaches 205F or more.  Sorry for the blurry shot...



I'm tired...  To be continued...


Continuing...


This is about 10 minutes into the bake right before I remove the steam pan.  Notice the oven spring...


 



Loaves out of the oven 1 hr after removing the steam pan



Crumbshot!



Thanks for reading...  Enjoy!

jowilchek's picture

"Spelt Flour"

August 5, 2010 - 10:47am -- jowilchek
Forums: 

I have a recipe I would like to try, but...it calls for "spelt flour" and I have just recently heard of this (on this and other sites). But have not seen it in any of my grocery stores. We have Kroger, Ingles, Food Lion, and Food Depot also Publix.
What if anything can I use as a substitute and still reach the same taste and quality of the recipe???
Thanks

lief's picture
lief

I got an awesome fathers day gift from my daughter this year. She is going to New York University so she has been running around the Big Apple for a couple of years now. One of her favorite spots to pick up bakery items is Amy's Bread, which sells a book with some of their recipes, and that was my gift :-)


I have been slowly going through it, reading about their general take on the art of baking bread and perusing the recipes trying to decide what to bake first. I've been on a bit of a spelt kick lately, so I decided to start out with the Organic Whole Grain Spelt with Flax and Sesame recipe.


  


 


Notice the white streaks on the crust? I have been having a problem with this for a very long time, but it has only shown up intermittently. I have made all sorts of adjustments to my methods, ingredients, and physical baking apparatus to try and figure out the source of the whitening of the crust to no avail. This book may have the answer!!!! In fact, at the end of this very recipe the book states that white streaks can occur due to INSUFFICIENT STEAM. Hallelujah! Definitely makes sense because the results were never consistent... perhaps I'm depending on how quickly I manage to close the oven door after applying the steam or how long my steaming apparatus was preheated? I got very excited after reading this and when I baked this bread, I made a number of adjustments to my steaming method to try and increase the amount of steam that I got. I definitely got more steam than usual, but the bread still has white streaks. Looks like I need to make further improvements. I also bought a large foil roasting pan to try the covered "self steaming" method, but it wouldn't work for this bake, which included two large loaf pans. Has anyone else had this issue? If so, how did you solve it?


Whitening aside, the crumb was quite dense, moist, and had a nice whole grain taste. However, it was also quite sour... almost too much. This is undoubtedly due to the modifications that I made to the recipe. The original recipe called for commercial yeast along with a levain. I've been spurning commercial yeast lately, so I decided to leave it out. However, I left everything else the same. This necessarily meant that the time tables would be stretched out by quite a bit. Also, in the original recipe, the bread is baked on the same day that the final dough is assembled. I said nuts to that! I'm sure that the long retarded proof that I gave it was the main reason for the kick that it had. It is 100% whole grain after all! If I were to do it over again, I would probably bake it on the same day. I may even add commercial yeast. I guess the recipe was written that way for a reason ;-)

bread10's picture

Kamut (Khorasan) vs Spelt Flour

July 3, 2010 - 9:37pm -- bread10
Forums: 

Hello,


 


I have used wholemeal spelt for both bread and pasta and also white spelt for bread.


I have used Kamut / Khorasan / Egyptian Gold once for pasta, but am not very familiar with the properties of this flour, apart from that it is very similar to spelt.


 


I would like to know how Kamut compares to spelt particularly for breadmaking. (Health & nutrition, protein, ease of digestion, breadmaking, taste etc...) ??


and anything else that may be of particular interest regarding these flours?

saumhain's picture
saumhain

I am leaving to Austria for two months, there will be no baking... Can't possibly imagine how it must feel: no kneading, no feeding your sourdough, no messing up in the kitchen. And my poor starter... I have just thrown it away in the bin, since none of my relatives seemed eager to look after it.


Anyway. I obviously could not leave my family without fresh bread, so I baked 5 loaves in just a couple of days: 2 pain au levain with whole-wheat, dark silesian rye,


rye with walnuts and




yeasted spelt loaf with mixed nuts and seeds




(original recipe belongs to Zorra from kochtopf.twoday.net and I should thank her for that!). However, I used a mixture of nust and seeds and since I had only dinkelvollkornmehl, that's what I used. Probably that is why I ended up with using about 200 gr of water in the final dough.


Even though, I have become quite a fan of sourdough breads and avoided baking with yeast only for a long time, I really enjoyed this one. It had a slightly sweet flavour and mixing the dough was really fun - I love the fact that it goes kind  of purple due to spelt.

moldyclint's picture
moldyclint

So , I finally have one I want to share in my first post!  I have only been baking steadily for a couple of months now, and since I successfully captured some wild yeasties, have been using them exclusively.  I have also tried to simplify things as much as possible, hence have tended to keep my sourdough starter roughly the same hydration as my final dough.  As I have a regular day job, but don't want to limit my baking to weekends, I have been working on a means of fitting my baking into a regular day's schedule, and have come up with a technique that seems to work for me (made specific for this loaf):


The night before baking, I take the ~1 cup of starter that I have in my fridge out, and add 1 cup flour, 1/2 cup water and ~1/3 tsp salt.  I typically use rye or whole wheat, but this time I used organic spelt (the existing starter was ~80% spelt, 20% AP).  Mixed alltogether and left on the counter overnight.


Morning, 5:45am before going to work, added 3 cups organic AP flour, 1 1/2 cups water, 1 and a bit tsp salt.  Mixed together, and put down in the basement where it is a bit cooler.


Went to work.  Returned ~5:00pm.


Had roughly doubled.  The challenge has been to find a spot in the house that is the right temperature to leave the dough all day.  This has been a cool spring, so some days the basement is too cold, and I get almost no rise. Recently it has been a lot hotter, and I can get over-fermentation.  This still to be refined.  Nevertheless, today things worked out perfectly!


Cut ~1/2 cup of dough off to save as my next starter, stretched/folded/rested/formed a boule and let it sit in the colander for a couple hours to proof.  Next used the handy cast-iron dutch oven method, and results were most satisfactory.  The starter got fed (tripled) and immediately put in the fridge.


I have varied quantities of starter from batch to batch, and this quantity (~1 cup doubled the night before and then more than doubled the next morning) has given me the best flavour yet!  Not so sour that the wife won't eat it, but not as lightly-flavoured as I have been getting with half the quantity of starter.  Mmmmm.


semi-demi-spelt sourdough


Bit of an explosion on the crust, despite a cramped (as it was in the dutch oven) slashing with my handy straight razor.


 

bread10's picture

Mixing Spelt and Quiona Flour - Bread

April 23, 2010 - 9:46pm -- bread10
Forums: 

Hi,


I am about to bake my first loaf bread in the oven. I will do sourdough soon but for now I wanted to just bake something up quickly.


I am looking at spelt flour bread recipes on the internet. I have a big bag of wholemeal spelt flour.


I am just weighing up whether to use half whole half white for lighter bread, or whether mixing quinoa and whole spelt would work??? If so how much (50/50??)


 


Thanks

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Just a little sign of life to say hello and to show that I'm still happily baking, not as much as I would like too but still enjoying it very much.


The pictures show a freshly egg-washed Zopf and my spelt multigrain boule.


Thomas




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