The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sept 26-28: A mix of inspirations

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

Sept 26-28: A mix of inspirations

Well, for last week I got to do a bigger bake than normal, since I was baking not just for ourselves but also to take a few things out to my In-laws for dinner on Friday (there were some East coast relatives in for a visit, so a clan dinner was in order).

 It ended up being a very mixed bake, with a lot of inspiration from missing-but-now-happily-returned posters, as well as the steadfast posters who always give me something to try…

 I was first reminded by Yippee’s pumpernickel bake that I was getting frighteningly low on my favourite dark rye --- and, of course, was reminded of just how many of dabrownman’s pumpernickels had added their influence to my base recipe.  I prepared some chocolate and red rye malt following his instructions, cranked up my levain following his NMNF build, and then put together this recipe (for 3 loaves) on Tuesday, to bake over to Wednesday morning (and be ready for slicing on Friday or Saturday):

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Rye

150

150

 

 

7.71

Water

120

 

 

120.00

6.17

GRAIN ADDERS

 

 

 

 

 

Rye Kernels

200

200

 

 

10.28

Coarse Rye Chop

230

230

 

 

11.82

Whole Red Rye Malt

20

20

 

 

1.03

Chocolate Rye Malt

10

10

 

 

0.51

PORRIDGE (made w/ grain adders)

 

 

 

 

Water

1800

 

0.8

1440.00

74.00

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Rye

780

780

 

 

40.08

Dark Rye

340

340

 

 

17.47

Altus: May 3 Pumpernickel

206

206

 

 

10.59

White Rye Malt

10

10

 

 

0.51

Salt

28

 

 

 

1.44

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

3894

 

 

 

200.10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

1946

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

1560.00

80.16

 

While I normally would do a 24-hour bake at 225 deg F, I referenced the pumpernickel recipe here https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2014/08/baking-traditional-real-german-pumpernickel-bread/  and followed her bake schedule of 1 hour at 300 deg F, 13 hours at 250 deg F, and then an hour cooling with the oven off.  The loaves turned out okay, but didn’t have the full flavour and caramelization that I am used to with the longer bake, so I’ll go back to my old ways next time my stash gets low…

 My next need was a couple of small sandwich loaves, and I couldn’t help but basically just do a repeat of my last one, blogged about here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/52920/sept-15-66-whole-grain-porridge-loaves  These both went out to the clan dinner, so no pics of the crumb, but I did grab a couple of pics of the loaves:

 Oh yeah – and along with them, are the rest of my bake of that day, something totally new for me: baguettes!  Well, short ones (I can only do max 15" long right now), but still:

You see, I had ended up re-watching Alfanso’s video on the Bouabsa double-hydration baguettes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYvORu_oLYc while responding to a post on the fora.  Since I had been avidly following kendalm’s responses to Restless Baker’s quest to learn baguettes, I suppose that the idea had been simmering away in the back of my mind.  While I can’t really get in to the fresh yeast / French flour works of art the kendalm is creating (totally intimidating!), Alfanso’s return reminded me that it can be a lot of fun to put your own twist on any recipe or technique. 

 So – I put together a quick formula that I figured should be nicely extensible (spelt is my friend), was a bit lower in whole grains than I normally go (just 30%), and with a fairly low level of pre-fermented flour (so that I’d have lots of leeway in using the fridge).

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

40

40

 

5.03

Water

32

 

32.00

4.03

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

35

35

 

4.40

Whole Spelt

100

100

 

12.58

Fresh Milled Rye

50

50

 

6.29

Chocolate Rye Malt

6

6

 

0.75

Red Rye Malt

6

6

 

0.75

Diastatic Rye Malt

8

8

 

1.01

Salt

14

 

 

1.76

All Purpose Flour

550

550

 

69.18

Water

531

 

531.00

66.79

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

1372

 

 

172.58

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

795

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

563.00

70.82

 I got this going a couple of hours after I had the porridge loaves happening:

 

Autolyse started at 2:30, with 511g water

Mix at 3:30, with levain and salt and extra 20g water

300 slap and fold, with 100 turns in bowl

SF @ 4:00, 4:30, and 5:00 - altready puffy, so straight in to fridge

Out of fridge at 12:00 --- split in to 4 @ 343g each

Preshape, cover with damp cloth, and rest for 30 minutes

Shape and proof on parchment- 2 at room temp and 2 in to the fridge.

GROSSLY OVERPROOFED THE ROOM TEMP ONES --- NEXT TIME, ALL IN TO THE FRIDGE!

Baked with steam for 12 minutes at 480 degrees (Sylvia’s steaming towel + 1c boiling water)

Vented and no steam for 10 minutes, to inside temp of 200. 

 This dough was insanely active!  I was anticipating fermenting at room temperature (a rousing 18 deg C) for at least a few hours, but it just took off.  I remembered Alfanso’s advice to someone a few months back to shape directly out of the fridge and then to fully proof in the fridge, too.  Well, I kind of followed it, by pre-shaping directly out of the fridge, but then let them bench rest a bit too long and had a hard time getting them to NOT stretch out to proper baguette length (I only have space to bake 15” long).  Telling them to “stop that!” as they stretched every time I moved the dough only worked somewhat…;)  The proofing in the fridge worked on the ones that I delayed,  while the room temp proofed ones madly over-proofed, so more fridge will be the plan for the next round…

 Oh, and there WILL be many more rounds of these!  We kept the two over-proofed ones, and had one of them polished off a couple of hours after they had come out of the oven.  The two better proofed ones went to the clan dinner (so no crumb shot), and the final over-proofed one was sliced up and devoured today:

 Excuse the lousy photography and lighting – the crumb really wasn’t that odd mix of colours, but even grossly over-proofed and shaped with very little skill, it came out good enough to make me pretty darned happy.

 These aren’t a whole lot of good for meal-type sandwiches, but are absolutely perfect for every other use.  The flavour was outstanding, and it was just plain fun to try shaping these tricksy little beasts!

All together, it was a fun few days of prepping and baking, and left me looking forward to playing some more this week.  Hope you all have just as much fun, and keep baking happy!

Comments

suminandi's picture
suminandi

Very beautiful loaves. Your clan is very lucky. The porridge loaves look particularly delicious. 

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

The porridge loaves are always delicious, and I hope you try a version for yourself, since they are a fun one to make.

Happy baking!

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

lucky clan thats for sure.  I am sitting here wishing I could sneak a small slice (as you do when slicing :) ) and slather with butter and enjoy!

I enjoyed your journey - baguettes are fun even though I haven't made many and they weren't very good, it is still a challenge for the future.

keep on happily baking!

Leslie

 

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

It's not "sneaking a slice" - it is the imperative quality test that all of us bakers and chefs are forced to endure to make sure that it is good enough to serve ;-)  It is an onerous chore, but one that we willingly suffer for the sake of our families...

I've been quite enjoying the journey, too - and am loving how it just keeps getting more and more fun to try new challenges.  I seem to recall your baguettes looking very baguette-ish --- and I'm sure that they tasted grand - but it's still fun to keep trying to make them that little bit better...

Looking forward to your next bake, too (since I'm sure it'll give me yet another "ooh - gotta try that!")

All the best to you and yours, and keep baking happy!   Laurie

alfanso's picture
alfanso

Overall the bakes look great, as usual.  But the baguettes, for a first time?  Ooo-la-la!  My early attempts were profane aberrations of anything remotely looking like anything beyond deformed banana slugs.  Thanks for reference.

alan

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

"Deformed banana slugs" --- pffftttt.  I don't believe it for a second!  Although, when the husband was wandering by as I was attempting to score the over-proofed beasts, he asked me why I was dissecting the poor dead worms... 

Seriously, there's no way I couldn't cite Don Baggie as my main source of inspiration, cuz who else takes just about any mix of flours and shapes them in to short baguette / long batard perfection?!?  Besides, I watched your video over and over again so that I could blame you if the shaping came out totally badly...

Thanks for the very kind words, and all of the inspiration and advice.  So glad that you're safely home after the hurricanes, and are back baking happy!

Best, Laurie

isand66's picture
isand66

Great Bake!  Those baggies look fantastic for your first attempt.  I am going to start trying to mix some more baggies in my rotation as well.  I have the flavor down but my shaping needs some work.

Happy Baking!

Ian

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

Thank you, Ian!

I have no doubt that you have the flavour down for baguettes, and that it would only take a couple for you to get back to comfortably shaping them. 

I'm looking forward to seeing your version - and seeing the flour mix that you enjoy for the best flavour.

Hope all is well with you and your clan (fuzzy or not!)

Best, Laurie

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

All of your breads look fantastic but those baguettes are amazing! You have some very good eating coming up!

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

The baguettes were a hoot to play with, and we loved eating them!  I actually have very little left from that huge bake last week - a few slices of one pumpernickel loaf, a full pumpernickel loaf in the freezer, and everything else is all gone...  Good reason to bake again, though!

I'm pretty sure that the only reason that the baggies that weren't over-proofed actually look somewhat baggie-like is that I cheated and went short (I think "standard" is something like 55cm, and these were only 38).  I'll need an equipment upgrade (some kind of long peel for moving them around, and a much larger stone in the oven) if I ever want to try a full-size, but that's for after much more practice!

I'm looking forward to seeing your special Thanksgiving bake --- and hope that you and yours are all well and enjoy the holiday together!

Best, Laurie

Yippee's picture
Yippee

that you can pull off such a large production. Even though it's quite difficult for me to bake even one loaf, I keep trying because baking for friends and family is one of the most rewarding experiences in life.  I'm sure you feel the same.  Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family.  Stay warm and happy baking!

Yippee

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

One of the benefits of retirement is having a more flexible schedule --- and one of the benefits of sourdough is that it is quite forgiving about being tossed in to the fridge!  This total bake was done over 5 days (including levain builds), but really only takes an hour or three each day, so is not too bad.  

You are very right that I find sharing the gift of baking with family and friends to be highly rewarding, and am lucky that they share the understanding of where the gift comes from.  I know that your family knows how much love is in each tiny crumb that you bake for them, and truly appreciate what it takes for you to do that for them.

A wonderful Canadian Thanksgiving to you and yours, too, Yippee --- and I hope we see many more of your lovely gifts as you keep baking happy!

Best, Laurie

dixongexpat's picture
dixongexpat

...so, so tired after reading about all the baking you did! LOL

Congratulations! Great looking breads.

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

You should be tired --- after all, there were minutes and minutes of effort involved here, and it takes a lot of energy to give the emotional support required to get it done  ;)

Great to see you back and well - and can't wait to see what wildness you come up with next!

Best, Laurie

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Don't feel badly that you can't make full-size baguettes at home. Few if any of us without commercial ovens can. Just call them "demi-baguettes" or make up a fancy French name for them. Whatever you call them, they look great.

I share your appreciation for the increased scheduling flexibility retirement provides and your obvious delight in being able to bake for friends and family.

Happy baking!

David

 

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

Thank you so much, David, for your kind words and all of the knowledge and encouragement that you share here. 

One of the most important things that I've learned here is that it really is all about having fun, and that any formula or technique or shape becomes our own (along with whatever we want to call it!) as soon as we use it in our kitchen, with our tools and ingredients, and with our hands. 

I'm very glad that I chose learning to bake bread as my first "retirement hobby" - and that I found this forum with so many folks like yourself to make the learning so easy and so much fun.

All the best to you and yours, and keep baking happy!

Laurie

kendalm's picture
kendalm

So is another butter out there into crazy multi bake gauntlets - one thing I am interesred in is your spelt and duram blend have recently been freaked out by my flour supplier disappearing for a month - would really love to hear about the flavor etc but maybe its beat just to give it a shot. Btw lepicerie is back online and was just moving warehouse from NYC to rhode island so yay ! As for alans advice to shape out of the fridge (well,preshape then shape) this always works best for me - the dough does not take off on you and scoring is so much easier too. Your baguettes look fantastic and I'm sure they taste amazing too !