The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Honeyed Spelt and Oat

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Honeyed Spelt and Oat

This recipe is from Sourdough: Recipes for Rustic Fermented Breads, Sweets, Savories, and More from
Sarah Owens. She won the James Beard Award for 2016 in baking books. I don't own the book but I found a copy of the recipe online.

I changed the method a bit to allow for an autolyse with just flour but the dough was really stiff and I probably should have added the oat soaker in at the same time. Anyhow, this was my method which differs a bit from the book.

1. Make levain with 40 g water, 30 g starter and 40 grams spelt. Let sit overnight.

2. Make soaker with 140 g rolled oats (old fashioned) and 275 g boiling water. Let that sit overnight too.

3. Next morning, autolyse 245 g of warm water and 45 g honey with 445 g flour and 105 g spelt. I let it sit for one hour.

4. I mixed in the 110 g of levain, 415 g of soaker and 16 g of salt. I added 25 g of water here to adjust the feel of the dough. I did slaps and folds to integrate the oats right through the dough.

5. I started the bulk fermentation with folds every half hour and this went on and on and on. The dough just didn't seem to  want to rise at all. 7 and a half hours later, the dough had risen about 30% and was finally ready to be divided and pre-shaped.

6. I pre-shaped using the letter fold method and let sit for a half hour before doing the final shape. I shaped it again using the letter fold method and put it into floured baskets.

7. I let it proof on the counter for a half hour (next time I am doing the full hour) and it went into the fridge for an overnight proof.

8. Late the next morning, I baked it in dutch ovens at 500F for 20 minutes, and took off the lid. I realized 10 minutes later that I had not dropped the temp at the 20 minute mark and had taken off the lid instead. So I dropped the temp to 430F and let it bake for another 20 minutes. Once again, I wasn't paying close attention but it worked out anyhow.

The results were a delicious bread with a super fluffy crumb. The one loaf disappeared in one day. Mind you, the loaves were tiny and next time, I am doubling the recipe and not forgetting to autolyse the oat soaker along with the flour.

Crumb shot:

With butter and honey:

Comments

Ru007's picture
Ru007

That crumb looks great, love it! Lets not forget that golden crust... 

What did the oats do to the texture of the crumb, did it add some chewiness or did it kind of disappear? Could you taste it? 

Butter and honey.... YUMMY!! 

Great job :)

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

completely disappeared which surprised me because they were the large flake ones which usually take a while to cook. The texture was nice and fluffy, contrary to the chewy crumb I have been getting from other breads with all of the add ins. And yes, I could taste the oats. I am definitely making this one again. 

Ru007's picture
Ru007

"to bake" list.

Great job Danni, your loaf looks gorgeous on the home page!

Happy baking! 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I think I will have to put this on my list to try.

Leslie

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

Lovely, artistic loaf, and your patience is admirable.  I use a lot of Hamelman recipes that include soakers.  Unless the soaker ingredient is hard, e.g., cracked grains, he just uses room temp water.  Rolled grains still disappear in my bakes, even with room temp water.  I had a similar problem with a recipe where I tried to do an autolyse where there wasn't enough water without the soaker.  One solution is to use a Tartine/FWSY level of hydration.

PalwithnoovenP's picture
PalwithnoovenP

Love the crust and crumb! I'm sure it tastes lovely.

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Oh, you are making some lovely loaves, Danni! I've got a few of them bookmarked now. :)

I've started incorporating the soaker into the first mix of the dough too - way easier to get it all in there and distributed properly, especially when you're making a big batch. I can't slap and fold the dough for 10-12 loaves of bread!

I'm liking the way the soaked flakes disappear into the dough, actually. I make one with rye flakes and the bread ends up like a moist, creamy wheat sourdough, but with the flavour of rye. Best of both worlds!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that make it want to puff up in the oven.Has to taste as good as it looks.  Well done adn happy baking 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Really lovely. Would you mind if I featured this post on the homepage for a bit?

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I would be honored to be featured on the home page!

BXMurphy's picture
BXMurphy

Bravo! So many nice breads here and you baked a ringer! Good job! I'm jealous!

Murph

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Congratulations!

Cellarvie's picture
Cellarvie

What a great looking loaf Dann, open, moist crumb and shiny, crunchy crust, bet it tasted wonderful.  Thank you for sharing, and I'm going to give it a go. If I've understood you correctly the second day took about 10 hours in total which I'm happy to do for such a tasty looking loaf, but do you think adding a little more starter to the levain (maintaining %ages by adjusting down flour and water) would make timing more manageable, or does that risk  sacrificing quality?

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

because spelt usually ferments really fast for me. I think this was a one time exception. It might have been due to the low initial hydration and that my kitchen was on the cool side that particular day. 

The other reason I wouldn't increase the starter is that it might proof too fast in the fridge unless you don't mind checking it and baking in the middle of the night if necessary. But then, you might be sacrificing flavour. 

Just add the oats to the autolyse and see how it goes. I am going to redo these loaves soon but first, we have to eat up some of what I have stored in the freezer. Let us know how your loaves turn out. 

Cellarvie's picture
Cellarvie

Thanks for the advice Dann, much appreciated.  I'll let you know how I get on.

Chockswahay's picture
Chockswahay

That looks quite fantastic! (I know it's tasty too) ..... well done indeed :)

Cellarvie's picture
Cellarvie

I took your advice Danni and had a go.  The result was nutty taste, open texture, crispy crust – perfect with French butter and home-made Seville orange marmalade.  I should have paid more attention to your oven settings though because I used my usual bread settings but forgot to adjust down for the honey in this dough, I’ll take it down a few degrees next time.  I used my proofing box (improvised from a polystyrene box, a mug of hot water and a probe thermometer – not exactly high tech) and monitored proofing progress throughout.  Also, I did the final proof and bake on the same day rather than retard overnight because that better suited my schedule.  Many thanks for the guidance Danni, I think I’ll be making this one again, and again, and….. 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

How long did it take to ferment in your proofing box? And did you have to add additional water to the dough? Did you autolyse the oat soaker with the flour, water and honey? I am so glad that it worked out for you and that you like it!

I made it again this weekend and the fermentation took hours and hours again due to the cool temps in my kitchen and this time, the dough needed an additional 35 g of water. I replaced 100 g of the white flour with Robin Hood's Multigrain Best for Bread flour since I have a bag that needs using up; that might account for some of the additional water that was needed. 

My loaves also stuck to the Dutch ovens even though I had sprinkled cornmeal in the bottom. I just let them cool in the pot until they came loose. I am really not sure why they stuck. 

By the way, I used my brand new homemade sourdough starter and it worked like a champion. I think I got pretty good rise for a starter that was only 10 days old! (I will add a picture as soon as I get to my computer. Adding one is a pain on my phone). 

Cellarvie's picture
Cellarvie

Thanks Danni, it certainly looked and tasted better than my usual efforts so I’m really glad I spotted your post (and that Floyd used your tasty looking pic in the header). 

The bulk fermentation took about 4 hours at about 25c with letter folds every half hour, until it achieved the 30% rise you told me to watch for.  The final proof took about 1½ hours, again at about 25c.  I don’t know if baking straight from final proof rather than retarding made a difference but the unbaked loaves certainly looked more buoyant than the sourdough loaves I’ve recently been retarding and baking, so I might try this with them too. 

Yes, as you suggested, I autolysed the oat soaker with the flour, water and honey, and then added the levain and salt after. I used high protein bread flour and organic spelt so I found the dough didn’t need any additional water (it was quite sticky) but I did accidentally pour 25g more hot water into the oat soaker than you advised, so I corrected this by reducing the water in the final dough by an equivalent amount. 

Your 10-day old starter clearly likes your set-up.  Mine’s 3 years old, is called Nigel, and despite irregular feeding, extended neglect and even freezing when we vanish on long trips, wakes up ready to party whenever  needed.  Until now I’ve used a high proportion of starter in sourdough levains but I wonder if the lower proportion used here meant Nigel had more to feed on and revved up in appreciation. 

almatec's picture
almatec

This is amazing! I have just been thinking of trying your recipe.

basic goodness's picture
basic goodness

Hi lall Iogged in just so I could make this bread with your lovely help hopefully..... I prepared last night the pictures the honey and the oats made me want to give it a go...

I made the autolyse 5 mins ago and it was so stiff made me want to knead it...I just notice the update about adding the soaker so albeit a bit late i squished it into the flour mix... now for the question I have to go out in an hour for about 5 hrs... should I add everything else ( salt and Levin ) or leave like this till I get back? any words of wisdom appreciated may bake late tonight but happy to bake tomorrow which ever will bring greatest success... any suggestions much appreciated.

basic goodness's picture
basic goodness

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

too late to help. That being said, I would have put the dough in the fridge until got back. Then I would let the dough warm up and add the levain and salt. Then continue with the recipe. 

basic goodness's picture
basic goodness

I got in two hours ago, having left it out for 7 hrs....I'm in London so pretty cold in my kitchen. Have added the salt and starter we will see what happens, thanks for advice. Very wet dough without any additional water the consistency was surprisingly supple...

-Marcia 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Hi Danni, love this bread!  followed your recipe pretty closely, wasn't sure if I bulk fermented long enough but we were going out for dinner so shaped dough, left out for an hour then into fridge for overnight retard.

Normally I bake straight out of fridge, but followed your instruction and left on bench for an hour before baking. Edit: Forgot to sprinkle more oats on the top! :(

Lovely moist bread, slightly golden in colour.

 

Crumb shot from small boule,  but it is now all gone. The other batard went into freezer and the above one I sliced and froze as well (otherwise we'd eat the lot!!). it is very nice indeed.

Happy baking

Leslie

 

 

 

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I am glad that my notes helped make it a success. 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I too will making this again. 

Leslie

basic goodness's picture
basic goodness

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

for that. How did it taste? 

basic goodness's picture
basic goodness

Just sliced it, tasted great,  I really like the addition of the oats, lovely creamy texture.  Will defiantly make again, need to watch my oven temperatures and have a free day for the folding lol... big air holes but I don't mind that ; ) 

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I love big holes like that in bread!!! Awesome job!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the poster being in the UK and using flour that isn't as thirsty as Canadian.  That might be why the dough felt wet and spread a bit with less spring  - but had great big holes.

I'm guessing you could up the hydration of yours another 5% and get similar holes ....and wet dough too! 

All the posters have made some fine bread with your recipe for sure!