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bblearner's picture
bblearner

My first try to use a starter to bake a sourdough bread was Mountaindog's Cherry Pecan Pain au Levain which was so dense and almost unedible.  I was sure something was not right with my starter.  So I requested MD post some pictures of his levains for me for guidance, which he did with nice illustrations.  I followed that to feed my starter for over a week and tried to build a levain with bubbles that would match those of MD's and finally I thought my starter was ripe enough to make breads, I tried the Country French Bread (Thom Leonard's), also from MD's blog :




The crumb was still a little dense because I overlooked the part on folding.  So a week later I had another try and followed the recipe as closely as possible and this was a better one :



 



I was so happy that my starter finally is working and the following one is Richard Bertinet's sourdough bread with a small touch of spelt flour :




Honestly, I like the flavour of the Country French Bread more.  My next exercise will be the Pecan Cranberry Pain au Levain, again. 


I would like to thank everybody on this site for their generosity of sharing techniques, experiences, recipes, etc. and a special thanks to Mountaindog's encouragement!

audra36274's picture
audra36274

I had taken a few loaves (my first attempt) Paul's Sweet Vanilla Challah from the oven and was working on my photo's. I went back to get the smaller loaf to re- do the shot and it had been assaulted! My shaping was out of practice on my challah, but the taste is fantastic. 

koloatree's picture
koloatree

greetings all!


 


retried the raisin walnut sourdough recipe from my previous post. i am pleased with the results, however, i am still trying to achieve a better scoring and ear curl. i think i was slashing too deep. i will try the suggestions that i recieved from the discussion thread. thanks members of freshloaf!


 



 



 



 


next up at bat was another susan sourdough attempt. i made a mistake during the shaping phase which caused me to shape again and again and again. in doing so, nice bubblies were let loose. pooof....next time i will try to shape a better batard. even though the looks lack, the taste was on point. soft in the inside, and a nice exterior crunch. total time of the first and second proof = ~13hrs @ 86 degrees. this was double the recipe btw.


 



 



 


next up was another attempt at baguettes using anis method with sourdough starter. i am still striving for the nice crispy crusty explosive looking baguette. i 'think' it may have something to do with the flour. i am going to give the king authurs artisan flour a shot. supposedly its ~11.6 protein content. also, i forgot to turn down the temperature after placing the baguettes into the oven, i used KA AP which is around 13% protein?


 



 



 


 


next up is pizza using anis bouabsa mixing method. it is by far my favorite crust i have achieved to date. the only thing i would improve is using a starter for a little sourdough taste.



 



 



 


 


 


 


 

gothicgirl's picture
gothicgirl

Posted on www.evilshenanaigans.com  4/8/2009


I am a bacon devotee.  I'm not sure if you have noticed, but I love the stuff!  That's why when I was challenged to create a sweet and savoury bacon muffin I jumped at the challenge!


Maple and Bacon Muffins 


But, this is a tale of sadness, regret, but eventual triumph! 


Two months ago, on a cold January evening, I was contemplating new ways to use bacon in my baking when my husband asked, "Can you make a bacon cupcake?"  A cupcake?  No, not that, never that.  However, a muffin I could do!  So, off to research.  I formulated a recipe with a brown sugar crumble and gave it a whirl.


Maple and Bacon Muffins 


They tasted great, but looked about as pretty as homemade soap.  Not a shining moment for me, but I moved on.  Next I tried no crumble and more maple.  They were far too sweet and had the texture of sticky cornbread.  BLEH!   Long story short (too late, right?), after a few more failures I struck the right balance of salty and sweet in a tender, bulging muffins!  It is this that I present to you, the perfect brunch bread. .. Maple and Bacon Muffins!   


Maple and Bacon Muffins   Yield 1 dozen


2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
4 slices bacon, cooked crisp and crumbled
1 cup milk
2 eggs
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup real maple syrup


Heat the oven to 400 F and line a 12 cup muffin pan with paper liners, or grease and flour the pan well.


Dry Ingredients 


Mix the flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt well.  Mix in the crumbled bacon.


Wet Ingredients 


In a separate bowl mix the milk, eggs, oil, and maple syrup.


Complete Batter 


Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into it.  Fold gently until the dry ingredients are wet.  It will be lumpy.


Scoop into the prepared pan and bake for 20 minutes.


 Maple and Bacon Muffins - Cooling


Serve warm.


Maple and Bacon Muffins

slothbear's picture
slothbear

white spelt sourdough bread


Eric's latest video masterpiece at Breadtopia is a whole spelt sourdough.  I was anxious to try it.  So anxious that I didn't notice that I had white spelt flour, not whole spelt.  No matter, the flexibleness that is bread took over, and it came out fine.

SamG's picture
SamG

Hi


I have been trying to find information about how bakers used to mix and knead large amounts of dough by hand? What were the batch sizes and optimal amounts of dough that were worked before mixers were around? Anyone out ther that can help me with this information?


Thanks....


Sam

yoelgal's picture
yoelgal

hi all,


i just join this forum,


i am from Israel and love baking bread,


i have my own masonry oven, build in my back yard.


the oven heating by wood fire,. same as 100 years ago.


i am using leaven and the results are great.


if anyone intersted i can send photos that shwos all the building procdure


from the begining .


see you


all the best


Yoel Lavi


Israel


 

chahira daoud's picture
chahira daoud

Hello dear friends , I really missed you all, but I did not want to show you my face untill I fulfill my promise to Minioven and other fellows, i promised that I will share my recipes for "Falafel & Egyptian beans dish" but till now I did not make it, I was so busy and I do not have any space in my freezer but I am thinking seriously to buy a deep freezer because my freezer is complaining. And I am used to prepare large batch and freeze it to be ready anytime, sorry guys and I will hurry up and make it as soon as possible.


Concerning the title of my blog entry, mmmmmm!!


That was my daughter birthday, I chose a savory dish beside the cake I made for her and her classmates, I baked these little hedgehogs, from 7 cups of flour, I got 69 cute hedgehogs.


I really liked it, I used it as sandwiches or canapes.


and as soon as they are out of my oven , they invaded my kitchen, there was a hedgehogs every where!!!!


 



There was even a battle.



But there was also a love story !!!



What do you think he is telling her????



My kids and the girls even all the adults like them from the first look.


Are'nt they cuuuute???


Thank you all and missed you all, and i'll be ready sooooon with my Falafel or "Taameea" & egyptian beans blog post.


Ah !! forgot to tell you about the birthday cake ,,, it was a hit!!


To watch it, please visit me on my blog


http://chahirakitchen.blogspot.com/


Bye Bye !! Love you all !!

alliezk's picture
alliezk

Yesterday morning I started off my spring break with mini egg custart tarlets, mimicing the ones I love from Dim Sum, unfortunately no pictures! They were gone very quickly.


Yesterday I also started my sourdough challah. I used a rye firm starter that has been growing for about 3 weeks, switched from a liquid started to a firm starter early last week. I also planned on baking the entire bread yesterday, but was so exhausted that after the first 2 hour raise, I left it unshaped in the fridge overnight, until nearly noon, when I had the first opportunity to play with it again. I took it out and let it sit for about 30 minutes, braided it (somewhat successfully), and let it sit braided for about 2.5 hours. During this time it only rose slightly. I was nervous when I put it in the oven, figuring that I had messed with the recipe too much and that the sourdough challah would be my downfall, but it popped up wonderfully and turned out rather nicely. I was happy with it as a first try, although my braiding skills need some work.



Afterward making the bread, I made dinner for the family. Balsamic carrots and celery, couscous, a small arugala salad with apples and chick peas and a honey champagne vinagrette, and herb crusted salmon.


Im on a roll.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thank you, David, for the title (AKA the little SD starter that could); it really was a long series of events! It began Friday night when I was trying again to finish part one of Little Dorrit, but, alas, I fell asleep again. When I awoke, with my neck aching, I stumbled into the kitchen and began throwing together the levain for Leader's sourdough rye loaves. Earlier in the day I had calculated that I needed to get this going just before bed if I wanted to bake the loaves the following day. When the levain was accomplished, I stashed it in the water heater closet, which maintains a nightly temperature of about 73º F, for overnight fermentation.


At about 9 AM the next morning I pulled the levain and from its incubator and began mixing the dough. By 9:30 AM with the flour and water hydrated and the levain and salt mixed, I began the machine knead, which needed a lot of manual help in my 1976 KA--there was much stopping and starting, and repositioning, wet bowl scraper in hand, until the battle of woman over machine was won, and dough decided it would after all sit on the "C" hook. Leader said to knead on "2" for a minutes and then on "4" for 8 to 9 minutes, but at about 6 minutes in on speed "4" the dough that had been behaving nicely all of a sudden melted off the hook and lay in the bottom of the bowl, so I decided it was probably kneaded enough. I stopped the machine, scraped it into the proofing bowl and let it rest for an hour.


10:45 AM: After performing one stretch and fold on the dough and being pleased with its structure, I returned the nice little ball to its proofing bowl, stashed in back in the water heater closet and set my timer for 3 hours.


1:45 PM: After checking on its progress, or in my case lack of progress, over the course of the previous hour I began to get a little worried. Which starter had I used last night, the weaker bread flour or the stronger whole wheat flour one? I couldn't recall exactly. I had meant to use the whole wheat flour starter, but doubt was setting in. And, there were also considerations about the cheese. I had made a special trip to acquire the precise cheese needed, bleu d'Auvergne, on Friday and didn't want to waste it on something that might be a flop. What does a person do in these circumstances? Put a cry for help out on TFL and make soup. I posted my cry, and started two pots of soup: the lentils with smoky ham that I had especially selected for dinner as a perfect foil for my little loaves and an old stand-by, chicken stock.


Four hours past, then five. Somewhere between the four and five hour mark I thought that I might be seeing signs of growth but it was painfully slow and who knew if or for how long it would continue. Still I held out hope and prepared the cheese, just in case.


At six hours, soups simmering away, I checked again and saw definite growth. Would it continue? I just didn't know but said "patience" to myself and tried to keep busy. Jim was now watching March Madness, even though it is April, drinking Orangina and vodka, and calling me "Marge". I wasn't amused and told him to make his own drink if he wanted another!


I served the soup somewhat disappointedly with Vermont Sourdough.


Lentils with Smoky Ham


Somewhere between seven and eight hours, I checked on the dough's progress and determined it had, indeed, probably doubled. I decided to risk the price of the cheese and complete the loaves. All rolled up and nestled in little bread pans also especially acquired for this bread, I returned them to the water heater closet.





After another painful hour I positioned the racks, placed a cast iron skillet in the lowest position, and on turned on the oven. I also checked on the loaves. Much to my amazement, they were rising in their tiny pans. My worry was fast turning around: I concluded there was reasonable cause for success.



An hour later, I loaded the ice-cubes in the hot skillet and bread pans in the oven. I looked through the window after 10 minutes and was positively elated to see a lot of oven spring.


I removed my lovely little, bubbly and fragrant parcels after 35 minutes. The entire house smelled divine (no doubt the chicken stock that was still simmering also aided the ambience of the evening).




Another 45 minutes past, and there was just 15 minutes more to go of part one of Little Dorrit, but I couldn't wait any longer. I sliced into one loaf, ate several pieces with gusto and we retired, I feeling very victorious and the chicken soup still simmering. It was pleasant dreams here for all. I awoke at 4 AM, turned off the soup and returned to dream of breakfast for a few more hours.





--Pamela

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