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yoelgal's picture
yoelgal

hi all,


i just join this forum,


i am from Israel and love baking bread,


i have my own masonry oven, build in my back yard.


the oven heating by wood fire,. same as 100 years ago.


i am using leaven and the results are great.


if anyone intersted i can send photos that shwos all the building procdure


from the begining .


see you


all the best


Yoel Lavi


Israel


 

chahira daoud's picture
chahira daoud

Hello dear friends , I really missed you all, but I did not want to show you my face untill I fulfill my promise to Minioven and other fellows, i promised that I will share my recipes for "Falafel & Egyptian beans dish" but till now I did not make it, I was so busy and I do not have any space in my freezer but I am thinking seriously to buy a deep freezer because my freezer is complaining. And I am used to prepare large batch and freeze it to be ready anytime, sorry guys and I will hurry up and make it as soon as possible.


Concerning the title of my blog entry, mmmmmm!!


That was my daughter birthday, I chose a savory dish beside the cake I made for her and her classmates, I baked these little hedgehogs, from 7 cups of flour, I got 69 cute hedgehogs.


I really liked it, I used it as sandwiches or canapes.


and as soon as they are out of my oven , they invaded my kitchen, there was a hedgehogs every where!!!!


 



There was even a battle.



But there was also a love story !!!



What do you think he is telling her????



My kids and the girls even all the adults like them from the first look.


Are'nt they cuuuute???


Thank you all and missed you all, and i'll be ready sooooon with my Falafel or "Taameea" & egyptian beans blog post.


Ah !! forgot to tell you about the birthday cake ,,, it was a hit!!


To watch it, please visit me on my blog


http://chahirakitchen.blogspot.com/


Bye Bye !! Love you all !!

alliezk's picture
alliezk

Yesterday morning I started off my spring break with mini egg custart tarlets, mimicing the ones I love from Dim Sum, unfortunately no pictures! They were gone very quickly.


Yesterday I also started my sourdough challah. I used a rye firm starter that has been growing for about 3 weeks, switched from a liquid started to a firm starter early last week. I also planned on baking the entire bread yesterday, but was so exhausted that after the first 2 hour raise, I left it unshaped in the fridge overnight, until nearly noon, when I had the first opportunity to play with it again. I took it out and let it sit for about 30 minutes, braided it (somewhat successfully), and let it sit braided for about 2.5 hours. During this time it only rose slightly. I was nervous when I put it in the oven, figuring that I had messed with the recipe too much and that the sourdough challah would be my downfall, but it popped up wonderfully and turned out rather nicely. I was happy with it as a first try, although my braiding skills need some work.



Afterward making the bread, I made dinner for the family. Balsamic carrots and celery, couscous, a small arugala salad with apples and chick peas and a honey champagne vinagrette, and herb crusted salmon.


Im on a roll.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thank you, David, for the title (AKA the little SD starter that could); it really was a long series of events! It began Friday night when I was trying again to finish part one of Little Dorrit, but, alas, I fell asleep again. When I awoke, with my neck aching, I stumbled into the kitchen and began throwing together the levain for Leader's sourdough rye loaves. Earlier in the day I had calculated that I needed to get this going just before bed if I wanted to bake the loaves the following day. When the levain was accomplished, I stashed it in the water heater closet, which maintains a nightly temperature of about 73º F, for overnight fermentation.


At about 9 AM the next morning I pulled the levain and from its incubator and began mixing the dough. By 9:30 AM with the flour and water hydrated and the levain and salt mixed, I began the machine knead, which needed a lot of manual help in my 1976 KA--there was much stopping and starting, and repositioning, wet bowl scraper in hand, until the battle of woman over machine was won, and dough decided it would after all sit on the "C" hook. Leader said to knead on "2" for a minutes and then on "4" for 8 to 9 minutes, but at about 6 minutes in on speed "4" the dough that had been behaving nicely all of a sudden melted off the hook and lay in the bottom of the bowl, so I decided it was probably kneaded enough. I stopped the machine, scraped it into the proofing bowl and let it rest for an hour.


10:45 AM: After performing one stretch and fold on the dough and being pleased with its structure, I returned the nice little ball to its proofing bowl, stashed in back in the water heater closet and set my timer for 3 hours.


1:45 PM: After checking on its progress, or in my case lack of progress, over the course of the previous hour I began to get a little worried. Which starter had I used last night, the weaker bread flour or the stronger whole wheat flour one? I couldn't recall exactly. I had meant to use the whole wheat flour starter, but doubt was setting in. And, there were also considerations about the cheese. I had made a special trip to acquire the precise cheese needed, bleu d'Auvergne, on Friday and didn't want to waste it on something that might be a flop. What does a person do in these circumstances? Put a cry for help out on TFL and make soup. I posted my cry, and started two pots of soup: the lentils with smoky ham that I had especially selected for dinner as a perfect foil for my little loaves and an old stand-by, chicken stock.


Four hours past, then five. Somewhere between the four and five hour mark I thought that I might be seeing signs of growth but it was painfully slow and who knew if or for how long it would continue. Still I held out hope and prepared the cheese, just in case.


At six hours, soups simmering away, I checked again and saw definite growth. Would it continue? I just didn't know but said "patience" to myself and tried to keep busy. Jim was now watching March Madness, even though it is April, drinking Orangina and vodka, and calling me "Marge". I wasn't amused and told him to make his own drink if he wanted another!


I served the soup somewhat disappointedly with Vermont Sourdough.


Lentils with Smoky Ham


Somewhere between seven and eight hours, I checked on the dough's progress and determined it had, indeed, probably doubled. I decided to risk the price of the cheese and complete the loaves. All rolled up and nestled in little bread pans also especially acquired for this bread, I returned them to the water heater closet.





After another painful hour I positioned the racks, placed a cast iron skillet in the lowest position, and on turned on the oven. I also checked on the loaves. Much to my amazement, they were rising in their tiny pans. My worry was fast turning around: I concluded there was reasonable cause for success.



An hour later, I loaded the ice-cubes in the hot skillet and bread pans in the oven. I looked through the window after 10 minutes and was positively elated to see a lot of oven spring.


I removed my lovely little, bubbly and fragrant parcels after 35 minutes. The entire house smelled divine (no doubt the chicken stock that was still simmering also aided the ambience of the evening).




Another 45 minutes past, and there was just 15 minutes more to go of part one of Little Dorrit, but I couldn't wait any longer. I sliced into one loaf, ate several pieces with gusto and we retired, I feeling very victorious and the chicken soup still simmering. It was pleasant dreams here for all. I awoke at 4 AM, turned off the soup and returned to dream of breakfast for a few more hours.





--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

 


Last week, I baked Susan from San Diego's “Original Sourdough.” My description can be found at:


http://tfl.thefreshloaf.com/node/11321/susan-san-diego039s-quotoriginal-sourdoughquot


Susan also shared her formula for her “Ultimate Sourdough,” which has replaced the “Original Sourdough” as her personal favorite, I gather. The “Original Sourdough” was so good, it was hard to imagine a bread that would outdo it, and I was tempted to just make it again. But I thought the other deserved a try. So, this week, I baked Susan's “Ultimate Sourdough” - again, with some variations I will describe.


Susan's formula for her “Ultimate Sourdough” is described in her blog, here:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6927/well-i-finally-did-it


Susan's formula makes “one small boule.” I doubled the recipe. I wanted to make two boules, one to bake after overnight cold retardation, as I did with the “Original Sourdough.” I also added a bit more WW flour than Susan called for and used a different mixing and fermentation approach.


 


 


Ingredients

 

Active 65% hydration starter

24 gms

Water

350 gms

KAF White Whole Wheat Flour

75 gms

KAF Bread Flour

425 gms

Sea Salt

10 gms

 

Procedures

  1. I dissolved the starter in the water in a large bowl.

  2. Both flours were added to the water and mixed thoroughly.

  3. The bowl was covered tightly and the dough was allowed to rest (autolyse) for 60 minutes.

  4. The salt was then added and folded into the dough using a flexible dough scraper.

  5. After a 20 minutes rest, the dough was stretched and folded in the bowl for 20 strokes. This was repeated twice more at 20 minute intervals.

  6. The dough was then transferred to a lightly oiled 2 liter glass measuring “cup” with a tightly fitting plastic cover and allowed to ferment, undisturbed, until doubled. (10 hours, overnight).

  7. The next morning, the dough was very soft, puffy and full of bubbles. I divided it into two equal pieces, gently rounded them, and allowed them to rest for 10 minutes.

  8. The pieces were then formed into boules and placed in well-floured coiled reed brotforms, each of which was then placed in a food-grade plastic bag.

  9. At this point, one loaf was allowed to proof on the bench, and the other was placed in the refrigerator to retard until the next day.

  10. The first loaf was allowed to expand by about 75% (3 hours).

  11. The oven was preheated to 500F, with a baking stone in place for1 hour.

  12. The loaf was transferred to a peel dusted with semolina, transferred to the baking stone and covered with a stainless steel bowl preheated with hot tap water. The oven was turned down to 460F.

  13. After 15 minutes, the bowl was removed. The loaf was baked for another 10 minutes, then left in the turned-off oven with the door ajar for another 5 minutes to dry the crust.

The retarded loaf was baked the next day. It was allowed to proof in a warm (75F) place for 4 hours. It was baked covered for 12 minutes, then another 15 minutes uncovered. It rested in the turned off oven for 10 minutes.

Susan's Ultimate Sourdough (Not retarded)

Susan's Ultimate Sourdough (Not retarded) - Crumb

Susan's Ultimate Sourdough (Retarded)

Susan's Ultimate Sourdough (Retarded) -Crumb

The boule that was baked without retardation was very similar in taste to the one I had made using Susan's “Original Soudough” formula. It had a nice flavor and was mildly sour. The sourness increased the next day, as expected. The crust was relatively thin but crunchy the first day and chewy the second day.

The boule that was retarded had a lot less oven spring. I think it was proofed more fully than the other had been. It was a bit more sour than the un-retarded loaf, as expected, but less sour than the “Original Sourdough” retarded loaf was. Tasted 5 hours after baking, the whole wheat flavor was coming through. I expect this to mellow out by tomorrow.

Bottom line: Both of Susan's sourdoughs are wonderful. I can't say I prefer one over the other after making each once. I expect I'll be making both regularly.

Thanks again, Susan!

David

 

 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Today's bake was Daniel Leader's Whole Wheat Genzano Country Bread, from his Local Breads book.  This bread combines a biga naturale for flavor with yeast for shorter, more predictable fermentation times.


The formula is straight-forward: the biga, water, equal parts whole wheat and bread flours, salt and yeast.  Final hydration works out to about 77%.  Based on Leader's description of the dough, I was expecting something almost in the ciabatta realm.  It turned out to be less gloppy than a ciabatta dough, perhaps because of the extra absorbency of the whole wheat flour.  Still, it was definitely better handled by the mixer than by hand.  I'm a little leery of his mixing directions, though.  First, he recommends an 10-minute run at speed 8 on a Kitchen Aid, followed by an 8-10 minute run at speed 10.  I didn't run it quite that long, or quite that fast, since I was seeing good gluten development.  Plus, the dough was clearing the sides of the bowl, even though it was very sticky.  The directions indicated that it probably cause the mixer to walk.  Hah!  I had to hold it down, what with the ball of dough slapping and releasing from the sides of the bowl.


After the mixing/kneading stage, the dough is dumped into an oiled container for 1-1.5 hours until it doubles.  It is then treated to a series of stretch and folds in the container (I used a plastic bowl scraper for this exercise), then allowed to double again.  Having finished bulk fermentation, the dough is scraped out onto a floured counter, divided in two, and (very gently) shaped into rough, rectangular loaves that are placed on bran-strewn pieces of parchment paper for their final rise.  The risen loaves go onto stone in a preheated oven, with steam.  The initial temperature is 450 F, which is dropped to 400 F for the second part of the bake.  Oven-spring was good.  The crust color is a deep brown, but not the near-black color promised in the formula.


The finished bread looks like this:


Whole Wheat Genzano Country Bread


The crust is thin and crackly, although I expect it will soften because of the internal moisture.  The flavor is very good; closer to that of a yeasted bread than to a sourdough but with some complexity that isn't usually present in a straight dough.  There doesn't seem to be the bitterness that sometimes shows up in whole wheat breads.  The crumb is moderately open, though nothing like the big holes of a ciabatta.  That's not bad, since this will be used primarily for sandwiches.  The breads are relatively light in weight for their size, another indicator of an open crumb.  I'll have to get a crumb shot, later.


I will definitely make this again, although I may experiment with leaving out the yeast.  That should swing the flavor profile in a whole 'nother direction.  Before getting to that, though, I have my eye on a couple of different rye recipes from Local Breads.


Paul

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

xaipete made me do it. The crust was OK., "nothing extry" as we say in Alabama.  It was a wild yeast dough that had been in the freezer for a couple months. It was very nice to work with but didn't rise too much . It did get nice and chewy and since I baked in a 550 oven with a really preheated stone the bottom was nicely browned in places. The topping was what made it so perfect. My sister in law brought me olive salad from NOLA. It is the best and since that was my home long ago I miss it and was so glad to get the gift. Added Itl sausage, sundried tomatoes from Whole Foods in NYC , fresh mozz and parma. YUM !!!


pizza Apr 4 2009

Jw's picture
Jw

I always like the positive approach. If have been able to progress with sourdough, the starter is really developing nicely. Last week I made my first sourdough from this starter, also somes pain ancienne. You can see that the crumb of the ancienne looks nicer (left), but the sourdough has more taste.


|


Today I made another sourdough, but used a flour called 'grobbe' to make the final dough. According to the label from the mill it contains: rye, line seed, corn and a few other things I cannot find the translations for. I basically followed the recipe for the Oregon Trail (The Doctor's Sourdough Bread). Happy with the result, the family judgement will be tomorrow at a birthday party!




This bread really asks for a lot of attention, but it is well worth it. Keep on baking!


Cheers,
Jw.


 


 


 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

OK, so I know it sounds like an oxymoron, but it works! Baguette dough is one of my favorite pizza doughs because it is easy to handle, has just a hint of sweetness, and bakes up as a sturdy, crisp, and thin platform (no sagging) that works no matter whether the topping be light or heavy. I baked this in the oven on my new stone (I didn't want to risk repeating last Friday's BBQed-beyond-all-recognition pizza). I had planned to top it with some pesto and fresh basil, but the pesto had molded and the basil, shriveled, so I just went with sauce and fresh mozzarella.


Neapolitan style pizza


--Pamela

alliezk's picture
alliezk

Summary of This Months Breads - The Obsession Begins.
Composed in terrible quality cell phone pictures (I am currently without a camera!)


I found this website about a month ago, while home sick and craving whole wheat pitas. I loved the blog style recipes - I always want more pictures - and I was greatly encouraged by my success with the pitas. I have been baking my whole life, but I have never had much success with yeast. I just never seemed to be able to get the timing down correctly, and things kept coming out flat. Once I found this site, I became immediatly obsessed with the challenge of sourdough and the beautiful loafs that were strewn everywhere. (As an aside, I cook and bake compulsively, as stress relief, and the college application process is certainly a stressful time!) Almost every weekend this month, I have tried a new recipe from the site and have had increadibly satisfying results. I have learned so much about bread, and hopefully my luck will continue to hold out. In general I have trouble sticking straight to recipes, and I do alot of improvising when I bake and take copious notes about the results. Just goes to show how chemistry is the perfect major choice for me.


The breads:
My first sourdough! I used a whole wheat starter with SourdoLady's blog as a guide, although I used grapefruit juice innitially rather than pineapple. My sisters said they could almost taste the grapefruit in the bread - it had a strong sourdough taste. Even more than what I was expecting. The bread is made with Deluxe Sourdough Bread Recipe, also from SourdoLady.



 


A buttermilk cluster - A new favorite!
I used a little less four than called for, and added a bit of whole wheat and maybe a tablespoon extra of buttermilk.





Soft Pretzels
This was my first time boiling soft pretzels before baking them. Im not sure if it needs this step. The dough for this recipe (the one posted by Stephmo) was lovely to handle before baking in comparison to the soft pretzels recipe I have been using. Hopefully I will have a chance to make that recipe this week and perhaps share the recipe if all goes well.



Rustic Loaf
For this recipe I made two larger loaves, and left one loosely dusted with flour. The other I added carraway seed before the final shaped rise and used an egg yolk wash with more carraway seeds on top. My Mom loves this bread warm with applesauce and butter on the top. Notice the giant pulled off piece destroying my picture of the crumb! I was really happy with the results. I want to work on shaping and scoring. I loved the texture of the rye flour and want to bring out more grainy texture in the bread, but im not sure how this will effect the rise.





I am playing with a firm rye started and hope to make sourdough challah over my spring break this week. I am also on the look out for easter dinner and dessert recipes, as once again, I am responsible for the family holiday meal (a blessing and a curse to love to cook and bake!).


Happy Weekend Baking to All.

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