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blackhatbaker's picture
blackhatbaker

Some Vermont Sourdough I baked this weekend. Increased the hydration to 70%. Baked the batard in a gourmet-topf baker that I got this weekend. Got my best ear so far, and a fairly open crumb. The only thing is, I feel like the boule had most of the holes on the upper half, but still a fun bake.

blackhatbaker

Grobread's picture
Grobread

Does anyone else struggle with naming their breads, or is it just me?

Anyway, this turned out really nice so I thought I'share it :)

I've been feeding my starter wit a mix of 70% whole wheat and 30% whole rye flour; and I've also been experimenting with sandwich loaves, so I thought why not mix both ideas? 

The general recipe is this:

Bread flour: 300 gr. (50%)

Whole wheat flour: 120 gr. (20%)

Whole rye flour: 180 gr. (30%)

Salt: 15 gr (2.5%)

Water: 500 gr. (83.3%)

Levain: 120 gr. (100% hidration) (20%)

(Final hidration is about 85%)

I mixed the flours and 480 gr. of water for a two hour autolyse and after the two hours I mixed in the levain and the salt with the remaining 20 gr. of water. I kneaded (slap and fold method) for about 7-8 minutes. Strech and fold at around 45 and 90 minutes; then let it rise for another 2.5 hours. Shaped and let it rest for 45 minutes, then refrigerate overnight, about 8 hours, and baked it in the morning for 75 minutes at around 215 C. I greased the pan with butter before the shaping and the top of the loaf before baking. 

The crust is crispy but no too thick, the crumb is heavier that the typical sandwich loaf, but open and soft and moist. And the flavor is great, a little sour and just enough rye taste to combine with anything without overpowering. 

Happy baking!

Pablo

CeciC's picture
CeciC

It has been so long since my last post, have been baking different bread but i get overwhelmed by work ><.. Finally i catch my breath, here is my lastest bake.

 

Recipe name

Bread with Fruit

Revision

Prune and Almond Levain

Revision notes

 

Product yield

2,181.00

Portions

2.00

Portion weight

1,090.50

Recipe's summary

Ingredient

Baker's %

Weight

Main ingredients

100.00%

1,000.00

bread flour

75.00%

750.00

Wholewheat flour

25.00%

250.00

Salt, table

2.00%

20.00

Water, tap, drinking

70.80%

708.00

Prune

25.00%

250.00

Almond

10.00%

100.00

Yeast

0.30%

3.00

Oats

10.00%

100.00

Totals

218.10%

2,181.00

Add here general directions for the recipe

Stage1: Liquid Levain

Ingredient used (%)

15.00%

Ingredient

Usage%

Baker's %

Weight

Main ingredients

100.00%

150.00

bread flour

20.00%

100.00%

150.00

Water, tap, drinking

26.48%

125.00%

187.50

Time required: 00:00:00

Totals

225.00%

337.50

Use 30G of starter to mix with above ingredients

Let it ferment at 29C for 8 hours

Remove 30G as seed

Stage2: Soaker

Ingredient used (%)

0.00%

Ingredient

Usage%

Baker's %

Weight

Main ingredients

0.00%

0.00

Water, tap, drinking

73.52%

73.52%

520.50

Oats

100.00%

100.00%

100.00

From:  Levain

100.00%

100.00%

337.50

Time required: 00:30:00

Totals

273.52%

958.01

Combine oats n water, let it soak for 30 mins

Disperse starter

Stage3: Final Dough

Ingredient used (%)

85.00%

Ingredient

Usage%

Baker's %

Weight

Main ingredients

100.00%

850.00

bread flour

80.00%

70.59%

600.00

Wholewheat flour

100.00%

29.41%

250.00

Salt, table

100.00%

2.35%

20.00

Prune

100.00%

29.41%

250.00

Almond

100.00%

11.76%

100.00

Yeast

100.00%

0.35%

3.00

From: Soaker

100.00%

112.71%

958.01

Time required: 01:45:00

Totals

256.59%

2,181.01

Combine all ingredients (except Prunes and Almond) with soaker and mix with mixer on speed 2 for 3 minutes or till it forms a dough

Mix on a higher speed till moderate gluten development

Add prune and almond gently mixed till they combine

 

Ferment at 29C for one hour give it a gentle fold

 

Bulk fermentation complete when you can see large bubbles on the side and around 30% increase in volume

 

Divide and shape with 30 mins rest.

 

Final proof for 45 mins.

Edo Bread's picture
Edo Bread

This used a mix of my two starters - wheat and rye. Pretty straight forward with some sunflower seeds added for crunchy deliciousness.

mahum26's picture
mahum26

I'm currently a Barnard College student, graduating in December. I am looking for an apprenticeship at a bakery or pastry shop in or around the city. I do not have previous experience in baking, but I have worked at a coffee shop that served fresh baked goods and have also worked at an ice cream shop shopkeeping and working the cashier. I am ready to start ASAP part-time as I finish school and would be ready to commit full time when I graduate in early December. I am really eager to work and keen on learning. Please let me know if you have or know of a position available, and I can send over a resume. Thank you!

isand66's picture
isand66

      I was in the mood for a nice Durum loaf and figured I would use the Tangzhong method to lighten it up a bit.  I've used this method for rolls several times but not on an actual loaf.

I have to say this simple recipe turned out amazing with a nice thin crust and moist and open crumb.  This is one of those breads you can just eat with some butter or cheese or olive oil and call it a day.

I highly recommend you give this one a try.  It makes great toast, grilled bread and sandwiches or goes well with some "Italian Gravy"!

Last week was our Lexie's first birthday and Max's second so we celebrated on Friday with a doggie cake.  Both puppies loved their cake :).

DoggieCake

DoggiesEatingCake

Closuep1

Durum Tangzhong Sourdough (%)

Durum Tangzhong Sourdough (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Closeup2

Tangzhong is the technique of heating a portion of the flour and liquid in your recipe to approximately 65C to make a paste (roux).  At this temperature the flour undergoes a change and gelatinizes.  By adding this roux to your final dough it will help create a soft, fluffy, moist open crumb.  It is also supposed to help prevent the bread from going stale.

It is not very difficult to do a Tangzhong.  Use a  5 to 1 liquid to solid ratio (so 250g liquid to 50g flour) and mix it together in a pan.  Heat the pan while stirring constantly.  Initially it will remain a liquid, but as you approach 65C it will undergo a change and thicken to an almost pudding like consistency.  Take it off the heat and let it cool before using it in your recipe.  Some people will refrigerate it for a while but you can use it right away as soon as it cools.

Levain Directions Build 1 (Using AP Starter at 66% Hydration for Seed)

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my Proofer set at 81 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Main Dough Directions
Prepare the Tangzhong per directions above and allow to cool to room temperature.

Mix the flours, Tangzhong and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, oil and starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and  mix on low for a minute.   Mix for a total of 6 minutes in your mixer starting on low-speed and switching to speed #2 for the last 2 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 78 degrees and only leave the dough out for 1 hour to 1.5 hours before placing in the refrigerator).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desire and cover with a moist lint free towel or sprayed plastic wrap. 

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.  Note: I used my proofer set to 80 degrees and it took a little over an hour to be ready.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown.

Let them cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb

 

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Am I the only one who takes some sort of idiotic pride in using the minimum amount of flour to get the job done -- and by job, I mean, having the dough release from the basket without ripping?  And by "idiotic pride" I mean, using too little and having my dough stick/rip on occasion because I put it in the basket somewhat sticky instead of adequately floured?

In addition to the idiotic part, I also have a practical question -- how do you get the seam side to be less sticky? Do you flour it before turning it over and shaping, or do you let it stay sticky and then run it through some bench flour at the end of shaping?  For some reason, It doesn't seem like a good idea to turn it over, flour it and then turn it over again.

In any case, my loaves came out pretty good considering the damage I did to them just before baking.

I blogged about it with lots of photographs, here.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Happy Thanksgiving weekend to all the Canadians here!

We are having some friends over who've never had a turkey dinner and putting on the whole production with stuffing, sweet potatoes, and cranberries tomorrow.  I'd like to also bake rolls using Peter Reinhart's Wild Rice & Onion dough, which is still one of my all time favourites. 

* * * 

At the top is a straight French bread I made last weekend to go with a pot of soup.  Nothing fancy, but sooo good with the right kind of meal.

* * *

Which reminds me, I recently received a copy of United States of Bread, a new release.  It is such a new release that it has a single (one star) review on Amazon. That is too harsh, In my mind.  

I'll agree that the subtitle and description are a bit ambitious for what is essentially a little book of traditional North American bread recipes, things like Anadama bread, Amish dill bread, potato bread, and buttermilk bread. A lot of recipes in it I am familiar with from versions of them in one of Bernard Clayton's books. But I like that it has variety but not too many recipes and could imagine giving a copy to somone just getting into baking those sorts of breads.

emkay's picture
emkay

I don't have anything too exciting or interesting coming out of my oven these days. I've been baking once a week just to make sure we have enough bread to feed ourselves for the week. My storage starter is still doing great. It's been in the refrigerator for 8 weeks (unfed) and amazingly there's no sign of mold. Only a tiny bit of clear hooch is developing. Every Thursday evening, I take about 6-8 g starter and feed it once (usually about 1:3:3 or 1:3:4). I build my levain Friday morning and let it ferment while I'm at work. I mix my dough Friday night and bake on Saturday.

I've been baking my bread in loaf pans recently. My formulas for naturally leavened sandwich loafs are pretty much the same as I would employ if I were to make free-formed hearth loaves. I might increase the hydration since the loaf pan helps the dough keep its shape, but I generally like 75-80% hydration, pan or not. I haven't used any recipe for bread lately. I've just been "winging it". When I first embarked on my sourdough journey in March, I never imagined that a bread newbie like me could ever get to the point where baking bread would become second nature. I am constantly amazed by the power of this newly found knowledge.

Here are two recent loaves. Both formulas are similar except that the first uses 40% levain and 2.5% salt and the second uses 12% levain and 2% salt. The higher amount of salt in the first was to help moderate fermentation. The timelines differed slightly. Even though the beginning of the bulk fermentation to hot bread was around 22 hours for the first loaf and 21 hours for the second, the first was shape retarded and the second was bulk retarded.

***

This first loaf had a very complex sour flavor. It was 20% rye. I think sourness was due to the rye flour in the starter, levain and dough. The age of my storage starter and the long shape retardation probably contributed to the lovely sourness as well. It had good oven spring and was airier than it appears in the photo. I found this one absolutely delicious.

rye_20pct_sandwich_loaf_1

rye_20pct_sandwich_loaf_2 

70% all-purpose flour
20% whole rye flour
10% whole wheat flour
80% water
2.5% salt
40% levain (100% hydration, 20% rye, fermented 12 hours)

  • Mix all ingredients in a bowl by hand.
  • Bulk ferment at room temp (74F) for 3.5 hours. S&F at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 min then undisturbed for final hour.
  • Shape and put into a loaf pan.
  • Retard the shaped dough in refrigerator for 18 hours.
  • Bake cold dough at 450F for 45 minutes (20 min covered/steamed, 20 min uncovered, 5 min out of loaf pan).

***

The second loaf turned out less lofty than the first loaf even though I used the same amount of dough in the same loaf pan. It was still good eats and made great toast. The little bit of cornmeal added some interest and crunch.

70% all-purpose flour
10% whole rye flour
10% whole wheat flour
10% coarse cornmeal
80% water
2% salt
12% levain (100% hydration, 10% whole wheat, fermented 12 hours)

  • Mix all ingredients in a bowl by hand.
  • Bulk ferment at room temp for 5.5 hours. S&F at 30, 60, 90 min then undisturbed.
  • Bulk retard in refrigerator for 12 hours.
  • Preshape and bench rest for 45 minutes.
  • Shape and proof at room temp for 2 hours.
  • Bake at 450F for 45 minutes (20 min covered/steamed, 20 min uncovered, 5 min out of loaf pan).

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