The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Blogs

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Doing a dry run for the upcoming World Bread Day 2020 in a couple of weeks.  This is a SD bread I shouldn't eat since it a 100% white bread with just 15 g of NMNF starter, but it does show that Focaccia is one bread where your artistic side can make you feel at least a bit Bohemian.

This recipe is our standard go to pizza dough as well. A 123 recipe where the dough development begins with one set of 150 slap and folds and 4 sets of slap and folds on 30 minute intervals.

We then added a paste made in the mortar and pestle of EVOO,  2 cloves of minced garlic, fresh herbs  Thai basil, rosemary and oregano incorporating them by spreading the paste the exposed sides of the 3rd set of stretch and folds.

We let it sit in the counter for an hour before we put it in the fridge overnight for a total of 16 hours so it could finish proofing.  After taking it out of the fridge, we let it sit in the counter to warm up for 2 hours before spreading it out on a sprayed jelly roll pan. 

The fun part was decorating the top to look like some weird abstract flowers made with roma tomatoes, Lemonm slices, scallions, asparagus, dried black olives, red bell pepper, Thai Basil flowers and leaves and crimini mushrooms. 

After proofing for an hour it went into the oven fat 425 F with Mega Steam for 8 minutes and then 8 minutes with the steam removed and switched to convection.  Lucy reminds us to have a great salad every day....

Happy baking Fresh Lofians!

Benito's picture
Benito

These are my first go at an all white flour 10% protein, in this case from Quebec, that is sourdough and no commercial yeast.  After the good results I had with the sesame semolina sourdough baguettes without commercial yeast I decided I needed to give it a go again but with the Quebec white flour.  These are essentially Abel’s baguettes au levain without the commercial yeast and hydration increased to 70% during bassinage and finally encrusted with poppy seeds.  So I’ll just call them Yorkville Baguettes since that is the neighborhood that I live in 😎

These were done in my now usual fashion with very little intervention, so only Rubaud mixing when adding the salt to ensure that it is well mixed.  There were no slap and folds done.  I did my usual two coil folds, in between telemedicine appointments (don’t tell my patients) so not quite at the usual 50 mins intervals.  Bulk fermentation was monitored with an aliquot jar once again ending when the jar showed a 20% rise.  The dough was put into a 2ºC fridge for bulk cold retard and stayed there for a bit more than 24 hours.

The following day I did a pre-shape into loose cylinders followed by a 25 mins bench remembering that the last time I used this flour it was extremely extensible.  Shaping when pretty well for me and these were each then dampened on a wet towel and “rolled” on a cookie tray with poppy seeds.  They were transferred to my floured couche seam side up thinking that the weight of the dough would help press the poppy seeds firmly into the dough to help attach them.  They were given a 40 min bench rest.  With 10 mins left to the bench rest the oven was turned on to pre-heat at 500ºF.  At the 40 min mark the baguettes were put back into the fridge to firm up and stayed there for 40 mins.

Finally they were baked as usual with steam at 480ºF for 13 minutes and then 10 mins at 480ºF rotating them at the halfway mark then the temperature was dropped to 450ºF and the baguettes were given another 3 minutes and then they were done.

Final Dough

475 g 10% white flour 

311 g water autolyse

9 g water bassinage

5.22 g diastatic malt

9.38 g salt

95 g Levain built with 12 g stater 45 g water 45 g white flour 10% protein

Overnight levain build with cold filtered water, refrigerate levain and then take out of fridge before bedtime.

In the morning dissolve diastatic malt and levain in water.  Then add flour and mix to shaggy mass.  Rest 20 mins then add salt and gradually add bassinage water, do Rubaud kneading for 4-5 mins until dough is smooth.  

Remove approximate 40 g of dough and set up your aliquot jar.  How to use an aliquot jar.

Ferment at 82ºF, after 50 mins do coil folds, then after another 50 mins do another coil fold.  Once the aliquot jar shows a 20% rise the dough is placed into the fridge until the following day.

The dough is divided and pre-shaped as loose cylinders and left to rest covered at room temperature for 30 mins.  The dough is then shaped, placed on a wet towel and rolled in poppy seeds.  Finally they are placed on a floured couche seam side up and left at room temperature for 40 mins to proof.  

With 10 mins left of bench rest the oven is started 500ºF to preheat.  When the 40 mins of bench rest is completed the shaped baguettes are placed in a bag and returned to the refrigerator for 30-40 mins to chill to make scoring easier.  Once this time is over the baguettes are scored and immediately placed on the baking steel and boiling water is added to the cast iron skillet.  The Sylvia towel with boiling water was placed in the oven 30 mins prior to baking time.

The oven temperature is jacked up to 525ºF to get the burners to activate immediately and then once activated dropped to 480ºF.  The baguettes are baked with steam for 13 mins.  The steam equipment is removed venting the oven of steam.  The oven is left at 480ºF but convection is turned on and the baguettes bake for 10 mins rotating them halfway.  The oven temperature is then dropped to 450ºF and the baguettes rotated again if needed and baked for another 3 mins to achieve a rich colour crust.

Pre-shaping

Shaping video

Scoring Video

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

At the end of July I finally gave in to temptation and ordered a new oven.  I settled on a 13 Function Bosch (not sure if I will ever use all of them!) and finally a week ago it was installed.

For this bake I just played around with some seeds - didn't want a heavy loaf so it was

Bread flour 80%, Wholewheat flour 15%, rye flour 5%, 80% hydration and salt at 2%.  I adjusted the flour to include 0.05% diastatic malt.  To this I added

Chia seed 4%, sesame seed 5%, flaxseed 5% sunflower seed 5% and pumpkin seed 5%. 

Method:

7 am: added hot water to the non ground, non toasted seed mix and left.  This was initially 60 g water and 86 g seed mix.  I felt it was a bit dry so added another 15 g water.

9:30 autolyse flours, remaining water and the seed mix for approx 30 minutes. I added extra 24 g water as well as dough felt quite firm. 

10 am Added the 100% hydration levain mixed evening before (9 g starter + 35 g flour + 9 g rye flour +43 g water) and mixed in with 100 slap and folds.  Added salt (7.2 g) and did another 100 slap and folds.  The dough was left to bulk ferment with 4 sets of coil folds every 30 minutes.  

14:45 preshaped dough

15:20 final shaping and left on bench until 5 pm when I refrigerated it until ready to bake. 

Preheated the oven & DO to 250 deg C on "Hot air".

18:15 loaded into oven and baked for 15 minutes, reducing heat to 245 deg C .  Baked another 15 minutes lid off..  Great caramelisation - so far so good, happy with the oven spring too.

Crumb shot

Really nutty and delicious and as hoped, the crumb was not too dense, yum!

I also made 2 other breads at the same time, following same basic methodology.

The 2nd bread was just 1:2:3 with 5% kibbled wheat, 5% kibbled rye & 5% rolled oats.  The soaker in this case was the same weight as the grains.

Crumb shot

Really enjoying this loaf.  I haven't used kibbled wheat or rye for a long time and because I probably didn't soak for long enough to soften grain properly, there is a slight crunch and flavour is lovely and mild, slightly sweet!

The last bread I made (although it was the first baked and is a little paler than the other two as I was feeling my way with the bake temperature) was another 1:2:3 with no seeds  but 8% rye and 3% potato flour. 

No crumb shot as this was a thank you for helping out with a chainsaw in the garden.  I offered him a choice of the 3 breads and he chose this one.  I am still to find out what the crumb was like and how it tasted.  It baked well and I was happy with it.

All in all, for a first bake in a new oven I am really really happy.  Crust is thin in all cases, and I achieved good caramelization (although I am sure the diastatic malt helped there too!).  Negative is that I could only bake one loaf at a time due to the shelf setup so oven ran for a bit longer than usual.  Will try out other options next bake. 

The flour I am using these days seems to develop enough gluten too so I am getting better shaped bread with good oven spring too.

Bake happy everyone 

Leslie

 

 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Because of COVID, we all minimize traveling. I haven't seen my friends for a long time, especially those who live afar. To reconnect with them, I made Rus's Ukrainian loaf and sent it to them with other homemade goodies. The bread was well received. My friends' wives all want to learn how to make it, but some are somewhat confused about the process. I summarized the steps to the bare minimum to help them start using CLAS ASAP to bake.

 

  1. Understand how concentrated lactic acid sourdough ("CLAS") works. Read the following blog post up to the point where video clips appear.  

     https://brotgost.blogspot.com/p/clas.html

 

2. Then, watch the following videos in which the baker demonstrates how to make CLAS. You may choose either one of the two methods to make it, depending on the available ingredients. 

 

a. Video 1 - the preferred method, watch up to 6:51

                 https://youtu.be/iPQV8qcwK1M

 

 

b. Video 2 - watch from 2:30 to 8:41

        https://youtu.be/niIcAuRRxWo  3. Recap

 

Being able to control the temperature in the required range is the key to successfully produce a flavorful loaf.  I use a proofer or the yogurt function of the Instant Pot. 

 

Making CLAS with rye, you will need:

Rye or any other malt: 25g

 Whole-grain rye flour: 75g

 Water T. 45°C: 180 ml

 Vinegar (5%???): 10 ml

 Fermentation temperature: 40°C±2°C

 Fermentation time: 24-36h

 Hydration: 190%

 End pH: around 4

 

Making CLAS with wheat, you will need:

wheat malt: 25g

 Whole grain wheat flour: 75g

 Water T. 45°C: 140 ml

 Vinegar (5%???): 10 ml

 Fermentation temperature: 38°C±2°C

 Fermentation time: 24-36h

 Hydration: 150%

 End pH: around 4

 

 

 4. If you are new to bread making, read the "What do you need to purchase to get started?" section in the following blog post before proceeding further. 

https://brotgost.blogspot.com/2020/03/blog-post.html   

 

 

  Making Rus's Ukrainian Palyanitsa loaf 
  1. Watch the following video in which Rus shows how to make Ukrainian Palyanitsa with CLAS. 

         https://youtu.be/tpNqhC5s_Ck

 

 

 

2. Formula and procedure

 

CLAS 101.5 g (hydration 190%, 35g wholemeal rye and 66.5g water)

(can be fresh or from fridge pre-warmed up to 30C/86F

 

Flour 665 g (high gluten flour German 812/or use bread flour)

 

Water 350 g (30-35C/86-95F)

 

Dry yeast 4.6 g 

 

Salt 10.5-14 g(table salt use10.5g, kosher salt use 14g) 

 

Total 1,144.5g

 

65% hydration = water weight / flour weight

 

(Dough temperature 30-33C/86-91.4F)

 

Bulk fermentation

90 minutes at 30-33C/86-91.4F 

 

Fold 

the dough according to the video

 

Rest 

30 minutes at 30C/86F

 

Shape

 

Final proof

25 minutes at 32 C/89.6F

 

Preheat the oven to 250C/482F

(It may take an hour+ to preheat the oven with the baking stones, so plan accordingly)

 

Score

 

Bake 

8-10 minutes 250C/482F with steam

then 40 minutes 190С/374F

 

 

 

 

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

 

This is a rare mid-week bake of a single batch that gives 3 loaves. What prompted this? James (aka Ciabatta) produced 12 loaves of 4 (Yes! Four!) different breads. His streamlined method piqued my interest so I decided to give it a shot since it I think it would shorten my dough making time significantly. So here goes:

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves 

 

Porridge

100 g rolled oats

200 g water

45 g honey

40 g butter

 

Add-ins

25g raw Black Sesame seeds

45g raw Sunflower seeds

35 raw hemp hearts

 

Dough

700 g unbleached flour

200 g freshly milled Red Fife flour (Red Fife berries)

100 g freshly milled Rye flour (Rye berries)

50 g flax, freshly ground

30 g yogurt 

600 g filtered water + 25 g + 25g + 25 g

22 g salt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

 

 

The morning before:

  1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of any kind of wholegrain flour. Let sit at room temperature about 6 hours. 

 

The afternoon before:

  1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and 20 g of wholegrain flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for another 6 hours. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill the Red Fife and rye berries. Place the required amounts of Red Fife and Rye flour in a tub, and add the unbleached flour to it. 
  2. Grind the flax seeds in a bullet and add to the tub. (I added the salt too at this time). Cover and set aside.
  3. Add the water to the rolled oats and cook on medium low until very creamy, then add the butter and the honey. Stir well and put into the fridge for the night. 
  4. Toast the sesame and sunflower seeds along with the hemp hearts in a dry frying pan or in the oven at 350 F. They are done when lightly golden and fragrant. Reserve.
  5. Before bed, feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 50 g of whole grain flour and 50 g of unbleached flour. Let rise overnight until doubled. 

 

Dough Making day:

  1. In the morning, when the levain is nice and bubbly, put the filtered water in a stand mixer’s bowl and add the levain, the flours from the tub, and the salt if it’s not in the flour mix already, as well as the porridge.  Mix on the lowest speed until all the flour has been hydrated and everything is homogeneous. This takes about 4 - 5 minutes. Place dough in a lightly oiled tub. Once I got the dough into the tub, I felt it was a bit tight so I added 25 g water to be absorbed during the folds. Let the dough rest for 45 minutes in a warm spot (oven with the light on and the door cracked).
  2. Give the dough a coil fold, add the next 25 g of water (dough still felt tight), and let rest another 45 minutes. 
  3. Dimple the seeds into the dough and give it another set of coil folds. Add another 25 g of water. Let rest 45 minutes. 
  4. Do another two sets of coil folds 45 minutes apart until the dough has developed enough to give a windowpane.
  5. Let the dough rise to 30%. This only took another 30 minutes. The dough already was at 30% at the last fold but I decided it needed one more to strengthen it. 
  6. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~830 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let it rest 15 minutes.
  7. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities or big bubbles. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule as you can.
  8. Sprinkle half rice/half AP flour in the bannetons. I also sprinkled some rolled oats in there. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Cover with plastic bowl cover or shower caps. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge until the next day. (I actually baked these at midnight since I had started so early in the morning and they had proofed in the fridge for 10 hours by then.)

 

Baking Day

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Then take the loaves out of the fridge. 
  2. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. (For fun, since I only had 3 loaves, I scored them.) Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 
  3. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

 

I wonder if I should have skipped the scoring as my loaves were quite a bit flatter than what I usually get. They also baked up quite dark and crunchy. I’m quite impatient to see the crumb. 

 

I really like that James’ method cut quite a bit of dough making time but I think I need to do a few more bakes to get loaves as nice as his. 

kendalm's picture
kendalm

I've been taunting Benny for weeks now about trying out some Canadain T55 and decided to have two baguettes square up and have a face off for the TXX grand prix.  For the record on the left is Canadian T55 blended 50/50 with French T65.  This blend is done by recommendation of lepicerie.com seeing that this particular T55 is ancieny Khorasan grain.  On the right is straight T65 from france.  First impressions is that the Canadian blend turned out really much nicer than the French.  The shaping and lead up was noticeably different in that the Canadian dough was a bit more putty-esqe and required some more force while shaping.  Basically much better ear development and just overall more appealing shape.  Maybe it was due to that loaf being shaped better.  who knows, and it may take several bakes to really stamp a blue ribbon here but first impression is very positive - 

 

 This loaf is 73% hydration and I noticed it felt more like a 70% or lower so the khorasan is likely more absorbent.  The French loaf I brought up to 74% anf really didnt get much burst.  Crumb pics on the way ... 

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

 

This is another one of Cedar Mountain’s recipes. I definitely need more practice handling dough that has this much rye in it. The dough was super extensible but not very elastic. I managed to keep the stickiness down to a minimum by keeping my hands wet during the coil folds, and being liberal and quick during shaping. It felt quite heavy even after bulk even though the bulk was fast compared to my usual bulk times. I gave it at least an hour proof at room temperature before retardation in the hopes of lightening the crumb a bit.

 

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

 

Add-ins

215 g rye berries (to be sprouted and then split into two equal portions)

15 g of black sesame seeds

 

Dough

300 g freshly milled rye flour (sifted and reserve bran for dusting loaves)

100 g freshly milled red fife flour

50 g freshly milled Kamut flour

550 g strong baker’s unbleached flour

700 g water

30 g yogurt

22 g salt

250 g levain (procedure in recipe)

 

 

A few days before:

  1. Soak the rye berries for the add-ins in filtered water for 8 hours. Drain and rinse every 8 hours until the berries have just started sprouting. I was shocked that they were ready in 24 hours. Then place into fridge until needed.

 

Two days before:

1. Feed 8 g of your starter 16 g of water and 16 g of unbleached flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

Two nights before:

  1. Feed the levain 40 g of water and 40 of unbleached flour. Let that rise overnight.

 

The morning before:

1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 100 g of unbleached flour. Let rise until doubled (about 5 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

 

The night before:

  1. Mill all the grains necessary for the dough. Sift the bran out of the rye flour and reserve.  Place all the flours along with the unbleached flour in a tub and cover. Reserve the barn for dusting the bannetons. 
  2. Divide the sprouted rye berries into two equal amounts. Using a food processor, chop the sprouts until finely ground. Be careful not to turn this into a paste. Add back to the other portion. Refrigerate. 
  3. Toast the black sesame seeds and reserve.

 

Dough making day:

1. Take the levain and both ground and sprouted rye out of the fridge and place in a warm spot.

2. Mix the water with the flour on the lowest speed in the bowl of a stand mixer until all the flour has been hydrated. Autolyse for at least a couple of hours.

3. After the autolyse, add the salt, the yogurt, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on lowest speed for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 7 minutes. 

6. Add the add-ins to the bowl and continue mixing another 2 minutes or longer until well distributed.

7. Remove dough from bowl and place in a covered tub in a warm spot (oven with light on). Let rest 30 minutes. 

8. Do 2 sets of coil folds at 30 minute intervals, then switch to hourly folds for another 2 sets.

9. Let the dough rise about 50%.

10. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~825 ???g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 

11. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make as tight boule.

12. Sprinkle rye bran in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons, sprinkle more bran on the dough and cover. Let rest for an hour on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge until the next morning. 

 

Baking Day

1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

These came out flatter than my usual oven spring but I’m happy they aren’t completely flat considering the amount of rye and add-ins in these loaves. Unfortunately these are all claimed for so I won’t know what the crumb is like. 

 


Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

 

 

This was a request from a friend as this is her favourite bread. 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

 

Add-ins:

75 g dry Wild Rice 

150 g dried cranberries 

 

Dough:

700 g strong bakers unbleached flour

200 g fresh milled Kamut 

100 g fresh milled Einkorn

700 g water

30 g yogurt 

35 g honey

22 g salt

250 g of 3 stage 100% hydration levain (procedure below)

 

Two mornings before:

1. Take 2 g of refrigerated starter and feed it 4 g of filtered water and 4 g of unbleached flour. Let sit at cool room temperature for the day. 

 

The two nights before:

1. Feed the levain 20 g of water and unbleached 20 g of flour. Let that rise at cool room temperature for the night. 

 

The morning before:

1. Feed the levain 100 g of filtered water and 100 g of unbleached flour and let rise until doubled (about 6 hours). 

2. Place into fridge until the next morning. 

  1. Soak the wild rice in hot water for the day.

 

The night before:

1. I use homemilled flour so if you are doing the same, measure out the stated amount for each type of flour in berries or grain, and mill it on the finest setting of your home mill. If buying flour, get the freshest that you can and try to ensure that it is wholegrain. 

2. Place the required amounts of the wholegrain flours in a tub and add the unbleached flour to it. 

3. Cover and set aside.

4. Cook the wild rice in plenty of boiling water until very tender.  Drain, add the dried cranberries, and refrigerate overnight.

 

Dough making day:

1. When ready to make the dough, take the wild rice and the levain out of the fridge to warm up before being used in the dough.

2. Using a stand mixer, mix the water with the flour, and mix on speed 1 until all the flour has been hydrated. Let this autolyse for a couple of hours. 

3. Once the autolyse is done, add the salt, the yogurt, the honey, and the levain to the bowl. Mix on speed one for a minute to integrate everything, then mix on speed 2 for 9 minutes.  

4. Add the cooked wild rice and cranberries to the mixing bowl, and mix on speed 2 until they are evenly distributed. This should only take a minute or two.

5. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and place in a lightly oiled covered tub. Let rest 30 minutes in a warm spot (oven with light on). 

6. Do 2 sets of coil folds at 30 minute intervals and then 2 more sets of coil folds at 60 minute intervals, and then let the dough rise to about 50%. It should have irregular bubbles visible through the sides of the container and  bubbles on top as well. 

7. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~780 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 30 minutes on the counter. 

8. Do a final shape by flouring the top of the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center patting out any cavities. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice tight boule.

9. Sprinkle a  mix of rice and all purpose flour in the bannetons. Place the dough seam side down in the bannetons. Let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge overnight. 

Baking Day

1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully but quickly place the dough seam side up inside. 

2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove the lids, and bake for another 22 minutes at 425 F. Internal temperature should be 205 F or more.

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

This is my third time making it, the most successful yet (first one was great, but I didn't scale the dough correctly to my pans, breads were too small; second was without any malt flavouring, and a little underbaked). I simply followed the instructions in http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/37222/borodinsky-supreme-old-school-100-rye, but scaled ingredients to two small bread tins I have (rescaled recipe here https://fgbc.dk/nrq). The only real difference is that in absence of red rye malt I just used a little barley malt extract in the scalding. I also used a little more salt and ground coriander, and way less sugar. Borodinsky I am used to in Russia is not that sweet

Baked for 55 min (with grill on for the last 5 min for deeper colour on top)

image image

Dark, but glossy top from the wheat dough washing and then starch custard coating after baking. I also added some caraway seeds on top together with coriander seeds (didn't put any in the dough).

image

Dark and moist crumb.

image

My first try, with some Polish herring with onions. Delicious.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs