The Fresh Loaf

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SusanMcKennaGrant's picture
SusanMcKennaGrant

the version with figswith figs

If you happen to be going to a farmer’s market this weekend you’re likely to find some fresh local grapes. Here’s a great way to enjoy them. This is my version of the delicious grape bread made every fall in Tuscany to celebrate the vendemmia (grape harvest). 

Over the years I’ve refined my process. I layer the grapes into the dough now, rather than just spreading them on top, which is the usual method. This way the delicious jammy juice produced by the combo of olive oil, grapes and sugar is preserved inside the dough rather than oozing out all over, burning the crust and ruining our baking sheets. I’ve also discovered if you turn the finished schiacciata upside-down to cool on a rack the juice gets distributed evenly. As it cools it turns into a light film of grape jelly, beautifully marbled throughout the crumb, not congealed into soggy pockets on the bottom as is usually the case.

Wine grapes are traditionally used and rosemary is the classic seasoning but sometimes I use cinnamon instead, especially if I’m serving the bread for breakfast. The seeds in the grapes give the bread a delightful crunch. When our figs are in season, just before our grapes start ripening, I get a head start with a delicious fig version. Post-harvest, I use the late-harvest viogner grapes we dry into plump raisins to enjoy a raisin-studded focaccia all year round.

I use a simple straight dough (no pre-ferment or biga). If you have a favorite pizza dough recipe you could use that. I mix the dough the day before and retard it overnight in the refrigerator. Recently I’ve discovered the semolina flour from Sicily or Puglia (semola di grano duro rimacinata) produces a sunny yellow, nutty tasting crumb that is a lovely marriage with the grapes, but all purpose flour is traditional here in Tuscany. Sometimes I make schiaccata con l’uva with egg-enriched pan brioche dough. That’s very special, especially for breakfast or to serve toasted with foie gras or a chicken liver mousse.

Making this dough is a little like making puff pastry, a series of folding and stretching, but instead of butter the filling is enriched with grapes, olive oil and sugar. I spread the dough out on an oiled parchment lined baking sheet and densely populate half of it with grapes. Then I drizzle EVOO and sprinkle sugar over that, along with finely chopped rosemary or a dusting of cinnamon. I fold the other half of the dough over the grapes and repeat the stretching and folding process using up the remaining grapes, more sugar and EVOO. Then dough gets stretched, drizzled and sprinkled again before baking.

  

FOR THE DOUGH
  1. 300 grams all finely ground semolina flour (semola di grano duro rimacinata)
  2. 240 ml tepid water
  3. ⅛ tsp instant yeast
  4. 6 grams salt
  5. 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
FOR THE FILLING
  1. a nice big bunch of red wine grapes, or if you can't find them use black concord grapes (or fresh figs or seeded raisins as described above)
  2. olive oil
  3. sugar
  4. finely chopped rosemary or cinnamon (optional)
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. The day before you intend to bake the focaccia mix all the dough ingredients together in a large bowl using a spatula. Make sure all the flour is incorporated and using wet hands form the dough into a ball. Cover the bowl with a plate and let it sit for 1 hour at room temperature.
  2. Using your hands, remove the ball of dough and stretch it out until it is about 8 inches long then fold it over itself two or three times until you have a package the size of the original ball of dough.
  3. Repeat this process two or three more times, you should notice that the dough has become quite elastic and strong.
  4. Oil a plate lightly and place the ball of dough on the plate, cover tightly with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 1 hour before transferring to the refrigerator.
  5. The next day, remove the dough at least an hour before you wish to bake to let it come to room temperature.
  6. Preheat the oven to 200 C (400 F)
  7. Brush olive oil lightly over a parchment lined baking sheet and place the dough on it. Stretch the dough to form a 15 by 8 inch rectangle.
  8. Densely populate half the dough with half the grapes, drizzle olive oil over evenly and sprinkle with sugar. Sprinkle rosemary or dust cinnamon on top if using.
  9. Fold the empty half of the dough over the grapes and repeat the stretching and folding process using the rest of the grapes, more sugar and rosemary or cinnamon.
  10. Stretch the dough out one last time, until it is the thickness of one layer of grapes. Drizzle with more oil and dust with more sugar.
  11. Transfer to the oven and bake for about 35 or 40 minutes or until the focaccia is nicely browned. Check the bottom to make sure it is cooked through.
  12. Let the dough cool upside down on a rack so that the grape juice can penetrate the focaccia. 
  13. Once cool, reverse the dough (dust with icing sugar if you wish) before slicing and serving.
NOTES
  1. You can use all purpose flour, but reduce the amount of water by 30ml (1oz)  
  2. A version of this post originally appeared here, on my blog,  in September 2015.
pasdedough's picture
pasdedough

This bread is 25% wholewheat, the rest strong white flour, I added a small hanful of semolina & 60g of golden flaxseed (soaked in water). My flatmate had requested a softer bread so it also has a little milk, oil and honey. Not sure about the exact hydration because I'm terrible at following a plan and not getting 'creative'...

I think that this crumb shows how much I'm improving at handling dough, it's really much better than the last breads ive made!

pasdedough's picture
pasdedough

Two challot for my family's rosh hashanah dinners, these had 3g of added yeast because I was nervous about them rising properly with only sourdough & the eggs, oil, honey that I used. Flour weight of each one was about 600g I think (I'd have to check back in my little book).

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I made up this recipe using a true cooked porridge method rather than a soaker which is my usual method when using porridge grains. I followed the method outlined by Ian and Laurie. To be honest, I am not sure that the results are worth the extra pain in the neck especially when making 4 batches of this. The crumb seems to be softer and hold more moisture but I should try this as a soaker as well. Unfortunately, I don't have enough of the 12 grain cereal I used to repeat this using a soaker. Anyhow, on to the recipe:

1. Toast 150 g of Daybreak Mills 12 grain cereal in a dry frying pan. 

2. Mix 345 g of water with 75 g of organic plain yogurt. Cook toasted 12 grain cereal in 3/4 of the water mixture until creamy and grains are al dente. 

3. Add the remaining water mixture to the porridge as well as 100 g of dried cranberries. Let soak overnight.

4. Autolyse all the above with 550 of unbleached flour, 202 g of multigrain flour, 200 g of freshly milled einkorn, 50 g of freshly ground flax seed and 555 g of water. Mix well and let sit for about an hour.

5. Add in 22 g of salt, 266 g of 80% levain and 20 g of water. Use the pinch and fold method until everything is well integrated and there is some gluten development.

6. Do 3 sets of folds 45 minutes apart and let rise until double. To be honest here, there was a slight detour to the fridge when I had to meet friends for a walk. When I got back, I let it finish rising which only took a few minutes. I actually like the little trip to the fridge because it makes the next steps much easier.

7. Divide into 3 loaves, shape loosely and let rest for 15 minutes. Reshape tightly and put into rice floured bannetons seam side down. Cover bannetons with plastic bowl covers and put into cold fridge for the night (~10 hours). In this case, because of the little side trip to the fridge earlier, I let the loaves sit on the counter for about a half hour to give the proofing a bit of a kick start.

8. The next morning, preheat the oven and the dutch ovens to 475 F. This usually takes at least 45 minutes. Load the loaves seam side up and bake covered at 450 F for 25 minutes. Remove the lids and bake at 425 F for a further 25 minutes.

9. Let cool and enjoy!

Crumb shots:

This was delicious! I might add a bit of honey to it next time.!

 

alfanso's picture
alfanso

After my self imposed hiatus of three months away, I decided to kick off the "new baking season" with a run of the Hamelman Vermont SD, again using AP instead of bread flour and using a rye levain instead of white flour - thus the "alfanso style" moniker.  Fortunately it looks as though I haven't lost a beat.  Funny thing is that my final blog entry before I left in June was for the same bread.  

I typically don't blog the same bread over again unless there is a change, improvement, a different shape or something I deem noteworthy to share.  However, in this case, as this is the virgin run of the season, I figured that I'd reintroduce myself with these baguettes/long batards.

And although we both disappeared from the site at the same time, I didn't run away and elope with dabrownman.  I just sure would like to know that he's okay, but he hasn't surfaced yet.  A loss for all of us here at TFL.

400g x 3 long batards/baguettes

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

There were a few things going on here this week, so I figured on keeping my bake pretty simple and straight-forward.  The only “extra” that was in the plan was to build up a bunch of both my rye and durum starters and get them spread out and dried to store as back-up, and to give to some family members who asked for some.

 With the drying in mind, I pulled out 10g each of the rye and durum starters, and started building them up over the course of Tuesday and Wednesday, then refrigerated Wednesday night.  My planned bake would only use the durum starter, since I was planning on a simple 1-2-3 with 40% AP / 20% durum / 20% kamut / 20% oats:

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

75

75

 

 

14.15

Water

60

 

 

60.00

11.32

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

30

30

 

 

5.66

Fresh Milled Kamut

105

105

 

 

19.81

Fresh Milled Whole Oats

105

105

 

 

 

Salt

9

 

 

 

1.70

All Purpose Flour

210

210

 

 

39.62

White Diastatic Rye Malt

5

5

 

 

 

Water

315

 

 

315.00

59.43

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

914

 

 

 

172.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

530

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

375.00

70.75

 

Plan was to get the dough mixed at some point on Thursday, bulk ferment in the fridge overnight, and then get it shaped and proofed and baked on Friday morning before heading off to an appointment early Friday afternoon.

 This is exactly what happened!  Well, except that…  the chat on the fora about my oat starter made me realize that I hadn’t ever used it by itself to raise a loaf – and had never done a direct comparison with it.  My planned bake seemed like the perfect opportunity to do this, so I made a last-second decision on Thursday morning to build up an oat levain from my oat starter, and put together a second loaf like this:

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Whole Oats

75

75

 

 

14.15

Water

60

 

 

60.00

11.32

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

105

105

 

 

19.81

Fresh Milled Kamut

105

105

 

 

19.81

Fresh Milled Whole Oats

30

30

 

 

 

Salt

9

 

 

 

1.70

All Purpose Flour

210

210

 

 

39.62

White Diastatic Rye Malt

5

5

 

 

 

Water

315

 

 

315.00

59.43

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

914

 

 

 

172.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

530

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

375.00

70.75

 

I started with 25g of the 80% hydrated oat starter at 7:45 a.m., mixed it up with more oats and water, and it looked like this:

 

4 hours later, it looked like this:

 

I added in more oats and water as a second stage of the build at 11:45 a.m., and it looked like this at the start, and then after 4 hours at 3:45 p.m.:

 

Now, I should have had the basic sense to let the levain mature at this point, but I already had the durum loaf mixed and fermenting, so figured that I might as well see what this totally immature oat levain could do (talk about asking a toddler to do an adult’s job!).  While it wouldn't rise past this point, the large cracks and holes (not really bubbles) would continue to expand if I left it to mature for another 4 to 8 hours, and the aroma would change as the yeast and LAB multiplied.  Instead, I mixed the dough, let it ferment at room temps for 3 hours with 4 sets of Stretch-and-Fold on the 30 minute marks, and then tucked it in to the fridge beside the durum levain dough to ferment overnight.

 In between working with the dough, I also got the fully built-up and active rye and durum starters spread out in thin layers on parchment paper, and tucked safely away in a draft-free room to dry over the next few days.

 When I checked the dough at 6:00 a.m. Friday, the durum dough was perfectly fermented, but there was very little growth on the oat dough.  The outside and bottom showed the development of a lot of bubbles, though, so I figured that it was using the levain too early that was the issue (not enough wee-yeasties bred yet), and that all it needed was a bit more time at warmer temperatures to catch up.

 I pulled the durum levain dough out for pre-shape and bench rest, and put the tub with the oat levain dough in to the oven with the light on and the door propped open.  Sure enough, by the time I needed to start pre-heating the oven for the nicely proofing durum levain dough, the oat one was just about perfectly fermented --- billowy, light, beautifully domed, with tons of bubbles all over the outside.

 This led to an issue --- I had an unbreakable appointment early in the afternoon, so knew that there was no way that I could let that dough continue at room temperatures, or it would end up over-proofed for sure.  The solution was to pop it back in to the fridge, to be dealt with when I got home.  There was just enough time before I had to leave to get the durum levain dough in to the oven and baked.

 I got home around 3:00 p.m., pulled the oat levian dough out of the fridge, pre-shaped it and let it bench rest for an hour, then shaped it and let it proof on the counter for another 3 hours.  The extra fermentation time gave me a really bubbly dough to deal with, so I de-gassed it more firmly than I normally need to, and tried to seal the shaping even more than usual.  It was baked at 450 degrees covered for 25 minutes, and then uncovered for 25 minutes to an internal temp of 202 degrees.

 Once out of the oven, it joined the other loaf on the cooling rack for the night, waiting to be sliced up the next morning for sandwiches.

 The durum levain loaf came out like this:

 

The oat levain loaf came out like this:

 

The oat levain loaf suffered slightly in crumb from me not getting out as many of the larger fermentation bubbles as I would have liked, and both could have proofed slightly longer, but I was pretty happy with both the oat levain loaf (on the left) and the durum levain loaf (on the right):

 We had a taste-test when I first sliced the loaves, and agreed that we couldn’t really detect much difference in flavour, although there may be a bit less tang and more sweet in the oat levain dough (a hint, at most).  Not really a true comparison, since there were so many differences in the levain builds and timing, so I might just have to do a better job of planning it next time!

 Honestly, it never ceases to amaze me how forgiving sourdough baking is – and how adaptable bakes are when you remember that the fridge is your friend, and to always watch the dough and not the clock.  After a busy weekend in the back-country, these fun and yummy loaves are almost gone, and the starters are fully dried and crumbled and safely tucked away…

 Time to start thinking about what the next round should be – and hope that you all are baking happy!

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Just in case anyone has relied in lepicerie.com for the flour needs you may have recently discovered their website has mysteriously gone offline with little explanation of why what and when. For me this was a massive disappointment as they have have been about the only source of quality T55 and T65 flours in USA and so having depleted my own supply a few weeks ago panicked and found some alternative sources for T55. The only other brand that appears to be available is francine which is more a supermarket brand. So today I completed a bake and thought I would share the results. First off this flour is only available in 1kg portions which is not so convenient especially if you bake a lot and prefer lager quantities (I go through about 15kg a month). The second immediate,observation is this flour is really light which is sort of expected for a t55 and additionally fairly bland aroma. In terms of kneading it was great - came together quickly and resulted in an incredibly smooth ball of dough. There are absolutely no improvers in this flour so to augment I added a smidge of ascorbic acid and about 0.02% diastatic malt. From here did 1.5hour bulk followed by a 6th cold retard - it rose a tad slower that usual bit overall did pretty well - actually it just seemed to take an extra 20 minutes to start showing activity so in reality I did almost 2hr bulk before setting it away in the refrigerator. The shaping and scoring was very easy with no wrestling the dough (which is how I feel about dealing with American flour - even the weakest AP resists shaping out long loaves) the most obvious difference here was the flavor - as can be seen in the photo the crumb is really white and tastes rather plain. Not sutebhoebibfeelnavout this flour just yet but plan to try upping the malt content as well as longer retard as 6 hours is really the minimum time I would never ferment for overnight.  Interesting experience and will try to coax more character from this flour next time :)

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

For this bake I wanted to use the Bob's Red Mill hot cereal mix that I had in the freezer.  Inspiration from Danni3113  who has made some great porridge mix breads.

8 am mix

Hot cereal mix  117 gm 

170 gm boiling water.

Cover and leave on bench until I got home 

2 pm autolyse 1 hour

466 gm bread flour

203 gm water - too dry so added another 50 gm, total 253 gm

Edit: include cereal mix in autolyse

3 pm

Add 12 gm salt and 

 262 gm 100% hydration rye levain and knead. 

A bit worried about sticky dough so added scant tspn gluten (a questionable move I think) and a good tspn honey as I thought maybe dough could do with a touch of sweetening.  

Dough was sticky and slack but I continued with 4 sets slap and fold/stretch and folds every 30 minutes. Room temperature 22°c at start of Bulk ferment

8 pm dough doubled so divided in two, preshaped and rested for 15 minutes.  Final shaping then into fridge overnight.

7 am today popped them into preheated DOs in the oven 15 minutes lid on at 230°c 18 minutes lid off.

 

At same time did a 1:2:3 loaf (back loaf in photo) with a mix of bread flour 70%/ multigrain flour 20%/spelt flour 10%. similar time frames except it used a bread flour levain and took longer to bulk ferment. Dough required 50 gm more water and was a pretty firm dough.  Baked after the porridge loaves.

 

Well, that gave me 2 totally different looking loaves.  Were the porridge loaves over fermented?  they spread and didn't get the oven spring I hoped for! or was dough strength just not enough to support ovenspring?   

 Crumb shot  comparison

the other two loaves

Crumb is good, so I just don't know....... 

Leslie

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