The Fresh Loaf

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not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

We have visitor's from London and they wanted to take some bread home so quickly made this

bread...

I pre-mixed the flour with salt the night before and put it into 10C wine cooler until 6AM when I just took it out and added 12 hour leaven via Rubaud. I have found that the pre-mix works on many formulas apart from the Champlain as long as I keep the dough coldish.....

After mixing in the leaven I warmed up dough for 4 hours in the proofer at 80F. Then pre-shape, 30 min bench rest final shaping and back in the wine cooler when we went for a walk for 5 hours...and then baked when back home from a walk in drizzly autumn weather....

Barney looks like he's been to Mars!  :D Kat

PalwithnoovenP's picture
PalwithnoovenP


...Ang inyo pong abang lingkod ay isa nang ganap na guro..!

Yours truly is now a fully-fledged teacher.

Yes, that's the good news that I've been wanting to share for so long but just couldn't find the right opportunity; since it is October 5 today which is celebrated annually as World Teachers' Day, I think it is now the perfect time to share it! I was just hired last September and I've been practicing the profession for almost a month. I consider my self truly blessed this year from passing the board exam to getting hired as a public school teacher. It's very difficult to get hired in public schools due to the strict selection process and I was even luckier considering that I have no teaching experience which a huge chunk of the overall criteria.

I am quickly adjusting to the new environment and busy schedule. My students get a reprimand from me almost everyday that I began questioning myself if what I was doing is right but I came to realize that it was an early sign of developing genuine love for my students that I am here to guide and correct them so they can be a step closer to their dreams.

I am teaching 3 subjects currently to 80 Grade 7 students. AP (Araling Panlipunan - Social Studies - Asian History); MAPEH (Music, Arts, Physical Education and Health); and TLE (Technology and Livelihood Education - Handicraft Production - with focus on Embroidery). Who would have thought I'll be handling these especially the last two since I have never considered my self athletic or artistic. :) It was challenging at first but I am slowly getting the hang of it, from actual instruction to classroom management. Classrooms can be chaotic sometimes due to 13 year olds emotional turmoil thrown into a melange of puberty and constructing their personal identity; but l feel I can control them more now compare to my first days which make the delivery of instruction way easier.

I once spoke in Mandarin to attract their attention and it was effective. :) And I see a considerable number of students who are willing to learn it; always asking me to teach them whenever they see me, their eyes glimmer even if it's just a simple word. I am thinking of pioneering a foreign language class to share what I know even how little it is.


Some gifts that I received from some students during our Teachers' Day Celebration. Even without it, their greetings inspire me more!

Although I have no bread or two to share now, I would like to take this opportunity to greet all teachers here in the TFL community a Happy Teachers' Day! Not only those who are teaching in schools but every baker here who teaches every baking aficionado  everything that they know for the improvement of skills and the realization of dreams! I am so thankful to all of you!

Maligayang Araw ng mga Guro!

Happy Teacher's Day!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

This weekend is Canadian Thanksgiving, and as usual, I have been asked to bring bread to the family dinner. Because it is going to be served with a number of different courses, I needed a rather plain sort of bread. At the same time, the 1-2-3 challenge presented itself. So how to combine the two… well, it is the harvest, might as well use the plethora of grains that are in my pantry as well as some flour from the local miller. He produces 100% wholegrain flour and a partially sifted flour. I bought both at the Farmer’s Market and made sure to include some in my recipe (the levain was made with this). The remaining grains were simply milled into flour and the bran sifted out to also feed the levain.

 

I must note that I initially thought “Yay, no math!”. But then reality kicked in. I needed to make loaves of a certain weight because I was selling some, I had to make 4 batches, each batch needed to make 3 loaves, I had to figure out the total amount of flour and how to split that between the levain and the main dough to respect the 1-2-3 challenge, the levain had to be multiplied by 4 with a bit extra so I would have enough, then that amount had to be split up to make a 3 stage levain, I had to decide which flour and how much would be used to put into the levain with the sifted bran, and so on and on and on. Just be happy that the math is all done for you in the recipe below. 

 

Recipe

Makes 3 loaves

 

Ingredients:

70 g Einkorn berries

70 g Spelt berries

70 g Kamut berries

70 g Rye berries

70 g Red Fife berries

70 g Selkirk berries

70 g Buckwheat groats

77 g Brulé Creek whole wheat flour 

76 g Brulé Creek partially sifted flour

630 g unbleached flour

720 g water

360 g 3 stage 100% hydration levain (process below)

25 g pink Himalayan salt

30 g local yogurt

 

The morning before:

  1. In the morning, mill all the grains and sift out the bran. I ended up with 459 g of sifted flour and 29 g of bran. Reserve the bran for the levain. 
  2. Place the sifted flour in a tub. To the tub, add the unbleached flour. Stir, cover and reserve for the next day.
  3. Take 26 g of starter from your fridge and feed it 26 g of water and 26 g of the bran. 

The evening before:

  1. About 12 hours later, feed the levain 52 g water and 52 g bran/wholewheat flour. Let rise overnight. 

Dough making day:

  1. Do the final feeding of the levain. Add to the levain 104 g each of water and wholewheat/partially sifted flour. This should use up all of the Brûlé Creek flour. Let rise till double. This took about 6.5 hours but mine sat for another couple of hours while the main dough autolysed (life got in the way). Amazingly enough, it hadn’t started receding when I finally got back to it.
  2. A couple of hours before the levain is ready (or in my case, when the levain was ready but I made it wait), add the water to the tub of flour and autolyse for 2 hours. I must note that I had to work a bit harder to get all of the flour hydrated. I do prefer to work with a slightly more hydrated dough but in the spirit of sticking to the 1-2-3 recipe, I didn’t add any water although I was sorely tempted to do so. I added the salt on top of the dough and left it there during the autolyse. 
  3. After the autolyse, add the yogurt and the levain. Mix well and let rest 10 minutes. Do in tub folds until the dough pulls away cleanly from the sides of the tub. Let rest 30 minutes.
  4. Do three sets of French slaps and folds (75/40/10) at 30 minutes intervals. Again on 30 minute intervals, do 2 sets of stretches and folds in the tub. Let rest until you can see bubbles through the walls of the tub, the dough feels a bit jiggly and there are some bubbles along the walls of the tub. The dough should have risen about 20%. I must say that this dough was a lot firmer than what I am used to and the gluten seemed to develop much faster. Total bulk fermentation at 72F was 3.5 hours. 
  5. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~730 g. Round out the portions into rounds with a dough scraper and let rest 45 minutes to one hour on the counter. 
  6. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice right boule.
  7. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 8 hours. 

These are proofed and ready to go into the oven. 

Baking Day:

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 205F or more.

 

 

Once again, the shorter bulk and proof are giving me loaves that I am quite happy with!

Lightsofroy's picture
Lightsofroy

well this week I learned a big lesson about leaving the house when dough is proving in the conservatory. What was originally a dull, yet pleasantly warm day quickly turned into an absolute scorcher and in just an hour my dough was ruined! My stretch and folds were  almost impossible due to the fact that (I think) the gluten was completely broken down (is that what happens?)

i baked it anyway and the results were flavoursome (first time adding spelt into the equation) but there was very little rise and they should’ve been at least 60 - 70% larger!

needless to say, whilst the crust was tasty the centre of the dough was hard work!

anyway, lesson learned....hopefully this weekend is more successful!

Bubsy28's picture
Bubsy28

Hi everyone!

I'm excited to start documenting my bread experiments - after several months of sad, yeasted sandwich loaves and gummy no-knead yeast breads, I finally got a metric scale and promptly saw a sharp uptick in the quality of my bread. I adapted Max Bernstein's Crusty White Bread recipe by giving it the sourdough treatment - multiple folds over several hours, and a long bulk ferment in the fridge to develop the flavor. I got by pretty well with that for another 6 months or so, but this month I finally got up the will to make a sourdough starter using KAF instructions. It took closer to two weeks to really get active, since it's finally starting to get colder up in the Northeast.

I know it's not as deeply flavored or complex as a more mature starter, but the first loaf I made (see below) with a 2-week old starter seemed like a great starting point! I tasted it the day it was baked and the day after, and it's ridiculous how much the flavor improved after letting the finished load rest for a day. 

 

Now that I have a good starting point for working with sourdough, I want to start messing around with more creative flavors. Maybe a cheddar loaf with the seasoning blend from Stella Parks' cheddar biscuits?

rgreenberg2000's picture
rgreenberg2000

Ok, so this weekend, I posted for the first time in over two years, and I mentioned that I'm not very adventurous......and, yet, here I am, posting about making my first ever baguettes.  I have long drooled over the many wonderful baguettes posted here, with Alan's leading the pack.  So, I got a bit of a wild hare, and decided that I'd give the baguette shape a go.  I started with one of my standard formulas - 75% AP, 10% WW, 10% Semolina, 5% Rye @ 70% hydration.  After doing a bunch of reading, and watching the King Arthur baguette shaping video, I dove in.....

I made up a standard batch with 1200g flour, autolyzed, S&F'd, and bulked.  I pulled off three portions of about 355g each, the remaining portion was destined for my usual batard.  I bench rested the dough, then shaped, and ended up with this (I floured the bejeezus out of my couche due to sticking issues the first time I used it!):

Proofed these up for about 90 minutes at room temp, then popped them into a 475f oven with steam:

Hee, hee.....I forgot to determine the length my stone would accomodate!!!  What a dope! :)  Oh, well, soldiering on.......

Well, I'll be darned, these don't look too bad at all (15 minutes with steam, 15 without):

Crumb shot (I love the color of semolina!!):

I was so excited, I had to have a sandwich in the vein of those I've had in Paris (butter, meat, cheese):

I'm pretty happy with how this first attempt turned out.  I will measure my stone for next time, will probably reduce the hydration to make for easier handling until I get used to shaping these, but really, I have no complaints!  They will get better with practice!

R

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

It seems that there’re not a lot of sourdough recipes on TFL that involve peanuts. In an attempt to change that, I tossed some peanuts into the dough…

 

Black Peppercorn Peanut Cranberry 50% Sprouted Kamut SD

 

Dough flour (all freshly milled):

150g      50%       Sprouted kamut flour

90g        30%       White wheat flour

60g        20%       Whole durum flour

 

For leaven:

5g        1.67%       Starter

20g      6.67%       Bran sifted out from dough flour

20g      6.67%       Water

 

For dough:

280g     93.3%       Dough flour excluding bran for leaven

170g     56.7%       Water

100g     33.3%       Whey

45g          15%       Leaven

9g              3%       Vital wheat gluten

5g          1.67%      Salt

 

Add-ins:

30g        10%       Toasted skin-on peanuts

21g          7%       Dried cranberries

3g            1%       Toasted whole black peppercorn

 

___________

302.5g      100%       Whole grain

292.5g     96.7%       Total hydration

 

Sift out the coarse bran from the dough flour, reserve 20g for leaven. Soak the rest, if any, in equal amount of whey taken from dough ingredients.

Soak the cranberries in a little hot water to re-hydrate. Set aside until needed.   

Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until doubled, around 3 hours.

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the salt and leaven, autolyse for 20 minutes. Knead in the reserved ingredients than ferment for 15 minutes. Fold in the add-ins and ferment for 2 hours 45 minutes longer.

Preshape the dough then let it rest for 15 minutes. Shape the dough and put in into a banneton. Retard for 12 hours.

Preheat the oven at 250°C/482°F. Take the dough out of the fridge and let it warm up for 20 minutes at room temperature.

Score and spritz the dough then bake at 250°C/482°F with steam for 15 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let cool for at least 2 hours before slicing.

The dough sprang pretty well in the oven. It didn’t spread much but I think it was owed to the relatively low hydration rather than proper shaping :)

If you’re like me, who complain that cracked black peppers could hardly be detected in bread, you have to try using whole peppercorn. The pop of spiciness is so stimulative!

This bread has well-balanced flavor: sprouted kamut produces a very sweet crumb, cranberries give some tanginess, toasted peanuts are toasty and savory, while the black peppers add hotness.

 

___________

 

Sweet & sour chicken, garlic scraps with tofu skin & black fungus, and eggs & shrimps. Served with super delicious plain Japanese brown rice

 

kerry tan's picture
kerry tan

this was a spelt 20% Sd with an overnight retard of 16 hours at 82% hydration

alfanso's picture
alfanso

My trip to Paris in June yielded these two useful results:  I was able to meet M. Bouabsa at his bakery for a few minutes and I came home with four 1K bags of T65 flour.  I’m certain that the flour isn’t the best quality as it was the house brand bought at the local Carrefour on my last full afternoon.  Held in abeyance until this weekend.

Styled on my version of Mr. Hamelman’s Vermont SD these are created using a 125% hydration KA AP flour levain which accounted for the 15% of the pre-fermented flour.  I picked up a bag of Bob’s Red Mill garbanzo and fava bean flour, as suggested by dabrownman and kendalm, and added 2% to the mix.  Therefore the quick formula is:

  • 83% T65 flour
  • 2% garbanzo bean flour
  • 15% KA AP flour
  • 65% hydration
  • 1.9% salt

Standard French Folds, 2 hour bulk rise, 2 Letter Folds, and retard overnight.  Baked at 460dF.  I usually get a darker bake than this, even with a pure white flour mix, but this is a new game for me.  And after the bake I looked at the ingredients and noticed that this was an unmalted flour, something unusual for me and which I didn’t take into consideration.  And I wonder if that is the reason that the baguettes came out paler than usual.  Or is this an expected coloration for this type of flour? 

3x330g baguettes

Update Oct. 01.  crumb shot added.  I had made an assumption that this bread di not have much of an open crumb.  And although it certainly is not very open it does display some characteristics of a standard baguette inside.  

I've already reworked the formula to include a pinch of diastatic malt powder, switch from an AP levain to an all rye levain and to increase the hydration to 68% for the next batch.

I hadn’t baked a rye in a while.  125% hydration rye levain comprising the 15% pre-fermented flour.  75% AP flour, 5% WW and 20% Rye @73.5% overall hydration.

 2X325g baguettes, 2x425g baguettes

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

 

Last weekend, we had a pizza party at the barn where my daughter leases her horse. The deal was that we provided the pizza oven, the dough, the sauce and the cheese. The rest of the gang brought the toppings. For us, we made Fig and Prosciutto pizza and Tarte flambée. The fig pizza called for caramelized onions. The last time I made caramelized onions, it took me 3 hours standing at the stove stirring the silly things. I thought that there had to be a better way and there is! It takes longer but there is no standing at the stove. Basically, one fills a crockpot half to 3/4 full of sliced onions, put in a pinch or two of salt, drizzle melted butter and olive oil over the lot, stir, and put it on low for 10 hours. Then, crack the lid and let it go for another 4 to 5 hours. The results is beautifully caramelized onions with no fuss! This made a huge batch and I froze quite a bit of them in ice cube trays. I also had a lot of left over cheese from the pizzas. So between the onions and the cheese, this bread was meant to be! 

 

Recipe

 

Makes 3 loaves

400 g unbleached flour

300 g bread flour

250 g high extraction red fife flour (I milled 285 g of red fife berries and sifted it. Save the bran for the levain)

50 g buckwheat flour (I used 50 g of buckwheat groats and milled them)

2 tbsp of dried Italian herbs

725 g water

100 g of shredded 4 cheese mix (parmesan, gouda, provolone and mozzarella)

72 g caramelized onions

30 g full fat plain yogurt

20 g salt

200 g levain (explanation below)

Plus high extraction whole wheat flour (local Brûlé Creek partially sifted flour) for levain

 

The morning before:

  1. Take 15 g of starter and add 15 g of high extraction wheat flour and 15 g of water. Let sit for 12 hours.

The night before:

  1. In a tub, put in the unbleached flour, the bread flour, the high extraction red fife flour, the buckwheat flour and the Italian herbs. Cover and reserve for the next morning.
  2. Use the bran from the red fife as well as some high extraction whole wheat flour to equal 30 g. Add this and 30 g of water to the levain. Let sit overnight.
  3. Thaw the caramelized onions if you have some frozen in advance. (Otherwise, slice one large onion and caramelize slowly on the stove with 1 tbsp of olive oil and a bit of butter as well as a pinch of salt.) Cover and reserve.

Dough making day:

  1. Very early in the morning, feed the levain 60 g each of high extraction whole wheat flour and water. Let rise for about 5 hours in a warm spot.
  2. About 2 hours before the levain is ready, add the water, mix well and let sit (autolyse) until the levain is ready.
  3. Add the caramelized onions, the shredded cheeses, the yogurt, the levain and the salt to the dough. Mix well and let rest about 30 minutes.
  4. Do three sets of French slaps and folds at 30 minutes intervals. The first set has 75 slaps, the second set has 40 slaps and the last set has 10 slaps. Continuing on 30 minute intervals, do gentle stretches and folds until the dough feels billowy, has bubbles on the surface, bubbles can be seen through the walls of the container and it giggles when shaken. I ended up doing two sets of folds but then the dough had to take a trip to the fridge because the kitchen got taken over by the daughter (She is a very messy baker 🙄). It spent almost 2 hours there. I was happy to see that the dough had risen only about 20% when I got back to it. 
  5. Tip the dough out on a bare counter, sprinkle the top with flour and divide into portions of ~710 g. Round out the portions into fairly tight rounds with a dough scraper and let rest one hour on the counter. 
  6. Do a final shape by flouring the rounds and flipping the rounds over on a lightly floured counter. Gently stretch the dough out into a circle. Pull and fold the third of the dough closest to you over the middle. Pull the right side and fold over the middle and do the same to the left. Fold the top end to the center. Finally stretch the two top corners and fold over each other in the middle and continue stitching the rest of the loaf. Roll the bottom of the dough away from you until the seam is underneath the dough. Cup your hands around the dough and pull towards you, doing this on all sides of the dough to round it off. Finally spin the dough to make a nice right boule.
  7. Place the dough seam side down in rice floured bannetons, cover, let rest for a few minutes on the counter and then put to bed in a cold (38F) fridge for 10 hours. 

Baking Day:

 

  1. The next morning, heat the oven to 475F with the Dutch ovens inside for 45 minutes to an hour. Turn out the dough seam side up onto a cornmeal sprinkled counter. Score the dough if you wish (I don’t as I like the rustic torn look). Place rounds of parchment paper in the bottom of the pots, and carefully place the dough seam side up inside. 
  2. Cover the pots and bake the loaves at 450 F for 30 minutes, remove the lids, drop the temperature to 425F, and bake for another 17 minutes. Internal temperature should be 208F or more.

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