The Fresh Loaf

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leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Ice Demeter gave me a little challenge a couple of weeks ago to get a great crumb etc on a 1 day bake as I did for an overnight poolish. So today I made a variation on Ken Forkish's  Saturday 75% wholewheat bread.  My variation below:

Bread flour (40%) 254 gm

Wholewheat flour (30%) 191 gm

Rye flour (20%) 127 gm

Spelt flour (10%) 64 gm

Water (80%) 487 gm (I kept back 21 gm - should have been 508 gm)

Salt (2%) 14 gm

Instant yeast (0.3%) 2 gm

It was 9 am before I got started with autolyse for 40 minutes, then mixed salt and yeast in. I did 4 stretch and folds every approx 20 minutes then left to bulk ferment. It was a little slow as room temperature was only about 21°C. At 4 pm it was close to tripled so I pre-shaped and after short rest finished shaping into 2 x 560 gm batards. turned oven on and preheated DOs . about an hour later poke test indicated  they were ready for baking so un-moulded, slashed, spritzed and dropped into hot DOs. Baked 15 mins at 240°c then removed lids and baked a further 20 minutes at 225°c. They were out of the oven about 5:45 pm.  

 

Loaves are still cooling, crumb shot tomorrow.  Let you be the judge once I have cut the loaves.  For now, reasonably happy. 

 Happy baking everyone

Leslie

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

One of my friends / customers recently had a heart attack and bypass surgery. He loves my bread, but his wife is understandably concerned about his diet, so I created a new bread for them based on some research into diet and cardiovascular health. There is evidence that whole grains, particularly oats, are related to reduced cardiovascular risk. Good fats can be found in olive oil and flax seeds, and sprouted flour and long, slow fermented sourdoughs may also have benefits (at least for digestibility if not heart health). Here's what I came up with:

I'm finding the addition of a little yeast water (apple, in this case) makes for a softer dough. This small amount probably won't add to the taste much, especially as the sourdough sort of takes over. And I added the bit of vital wheat gluten to strengthen the dough because of the relatively weak sprouted spelt flour and oats / oat bran.

The dough was a bit sticky but strong and fairly easy to shape. I mixed it in the big mixer (made a batch of six) for about 4 minutes, then did three or four stretch and folds over the first two hours. It ended up sitting in the coolish basement for about five hours, then I put it in the fridge overnight to bulk ferment.

This morning I scaled it and shaped it, putting it into floured baskets to prove.

About an hour and a half later I popped them into pre-heated cast iron pots to bake. They're still in the oven at the moment, but the test loaf (same formula, slightly smaller than the production loaves) is at the top of this post.

The crumb is lovely and moist, with a complex slightly sour flavour. Something my customer (and I) can feel good about eating! Oh, and he loves it. From the heart. :)

Flour.ish.en's picture
Flour.ish.en

If you like the flavor of licorice in jelly beans or fennel in sausages, you may like ground anise in breads too. I have not used anise seeds before in breads. But, why not? This unique and warm spice enlivens the fig and hazelnut bread. For the start, the sweetness of dried figs and the smoky nutty notes of roasted hazelnuts bring big flavor to the bread. Just the right amount. The surprising finish of anise is merely the icing on the cake, I mean, the bread. There is just so much to like about this bread.

The specifics of the fig hazelnut bread are shown in the cheat sheet below. In summary, a 12-hour stiff levain build, 20% in whole wheat flour, about 70% hydration, one fold half way through the 2 ½-hour bulk ferment and a 2-hour final rise. This is a straight-forward formula I’ve borrowed and adapted from Bread by Jeffrey Hamelman.

I made two loaves, ate one and froze the second one (which I forgot to score late at night.) Once reheated, the second loaf develops an unexpected crunchy crust, even better than the freshly baked loaf (the slice standing up, right below) as I can remember. Hard to believe.

Here is the bread reheating setting which have worked well for me: full steam at 212°F for 7 minutes, then convection bake at 320°F with 20% humidity for 35 minutes. The timing may differ depending on the size of the bread. The bread usually goes directly from the freezer to the cold oven. In case you wonder, there are countertop convection steam ovens which are fairly affordable and priced competitively. They are not heavy duty enough for baking breads, but perfect for reheating.

What goes well with the fig hazelnut bread? A fig salad tossing together fresh figs, baby kale leaves, prosciutto and a simple dressing. On its face, I’m convinced that the sum is better than the parts, including the bread!

https://www.everopensauce.com/fig-and-hazelnut-levain-bread/

 

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

Last week was another busy week with a high need for sandwich bread and not a lot of time to make it.  It was also still stupidly hot (27 deg C or more), and continuously hazy / smoky from all of the fires off to the west and south.  We don’t have air-conditioning, and opening the windows was questionable, so I needed to plan leaven amounts and refrigeration for best bake timing.

To keep things simple, I planned on a couple of very straight-forward low hydration loaves, both at 70% whole grain, with timing balanced around our chores and coolest temps.  The first was a mix of durum and khorasan (kamut), and the second was a hard red wheat / spelt / rye mix.

I started out last Wednesday by pulling out 4g each of my 65% hydration NMNF rye and durum starters, and did a gradual build-up over 3 feeds for each to be 80% hydration with 85g prefermented flour.  The final feed was around midnight, and I left them out at room temperature for the night.

 On last Thursday, I stirred the levains in the morning, but left them out until I was ready to use them.  I started both mixes with an autolyse (flour and water) for 2 hours, then added the salt and levain, and kneaded for 200 turns.

After a 20 minute rest, I kneaded again, and turned out in to fermenting containers.  I kept them at room temperature (27 deg C) while doing 4 sets of stretch-and-fold on the half-hours for a total room temp fermentation time of 3 hours, and then refrigerated them for 17-18 hours to be ready for a morning bake.

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

85

85

 

 

12.14

Water

68

 

 

68.00

9.71

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

160

160

 

 

22.86

Fresh Milled Kamut

245

245

 

 

35.00

Salt

12

 

 

 

1.71

All Purpose Flour

210

210

 

 

30.00

Water

405

 

 

405.00

57.86

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

1185

 

 

 

169.29

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

700

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

473.00

67.57

 

 

 

 

 

 

 At a ridiculously early hour, I pulled the first dough from the fridge, pre-shaped it, and let it rest on the counter (covered with a damp towel) for an hour.  I then did the final shape and placed it in a banneton with the damp towel over it to proof for another hour while the oven pre-heated to 480 deg F / 250 deg C.

I then pulled the next dough from the fridge and pre-shaped it to let it rest for an hour.  Once the first loaf was in the oven, the second was final shaped and left to proof in a covered banneton.

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Rye

85

85

 

 

12.14

Water

68

 

 

68.00

9.71

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

5

5

 

 

0.71

Whole Spelt

170

170

 

 

24.29

Fresh Milled Hard Red

230

230

 

 

32.86

Salt

12

 

 

 

1.71

All Purpose Flour

210

210

 

 

30.00

Water

405

 

 

405.00

57.86

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

1185

 

 

 

169.29

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

700

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

473.00

67.57

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was rushing too much when I decided to put the first loaf in to the oven, so it went in somewhat under-proofed.  It baked for 25 minutes covered at 450 deg F / 230 deg C, and then 35 minutes uncovered at 425 deg F / 220 deg C until it hit internal temperature of 200 deg F / 93 deg C.  The dough had developed a bit too much of a skin for a smooth oven-spring, so it ended up with some crazy cracking all over, but overall it came out with a great flavour and crumb for our sandwiches. 

The second loaf proofed a bit longer (about 100 minutes after final shaping) and didn’t seem to dry out so much.  I baked the same timing and it came out without all of the crazy cracks, a lovely flavour, and the same crumb.

 All in all, I was really happy with how they came out.  It is even hotter here this week, and our out-of-town chores have slowed down, so I’m not planning a bread bake this week.  We’ve got just enough odds and ends from previous bakes in the freezer for our needs this week, and I’m craving sweets for a change, so it’s oatmeal cookies today, and likely some fruit scones and muffins tomorrow (unless, of course, I change my mind…)

I'm just looking at these and laughing at myself from a few months back, when I couldn't even imagine getting this kind of oven-spring and lightness of crumb with a 70% whole grain, relatively low hydration dough...  Who knew that just a little experience would make this seem a "quick and easy" style loaf!

Hope all are safely out of harm's way from fire or water or wind, and are happily baking their own "quick and easy" or wild and fun experiments!

the hadster's picture
the hadster

I need another cook book as much as I need another hole in my head.  Last count, I had several hundred cookbooks.  I've read them all, many times.

So, I resisted buying "Tartine Bread" because I've put myself on cookbook restriction.  I am not permitted to go to Barnes & Noble, and I can't spend too much time on Amazon Prime cookbook section - because I have no will power.

There was such a buzz about this book and this method, so I gave myself permission.

In truth, the wet dough, the stretch and fold, and using a dutch oven is very similar to many other books previously written.  I'm thinking about the no-knead method of over 10 years ago and all the books that have come out using that method.  Peter Reinhart, (his book "Crust & Crumb" lead me to my AHA moment), uses long slow fermentation...  In truth, there isn't anything truly new in "Tartine Bread" about the recipes, method of building and baking in home ovens.

Still, I am most certainly NOT returning the book.  I love his story.  I think most of us here have been searching for bread with an "old soul," I certainly have.  I also value all the pictures, and his in-depth instructions and photographs for shaping are wonderful.

But what I find so wonderful about this book is the whole section on what to do with the bread after its made!  And that is why I'm keeping the book.

And I want to go on record as saying this: I own Daniel Leader's book, "Bread Alone." He advises putting a few grains of commercial yeast into your starter to "attract" the wild yeast. (honestly).  And he waxes poetic about wood burning ovens.

Having cooked in a wood burning oven, I know that the SOURCE of heat does not affect the taste of the bread at all - or anything else cooked in a wood burning oven.  If it did, we would all be barbecuing and talking about hickory vs oak vs maple woods - which, btw, make a huge difference is food that is exposed to smoke from those woods.

To have Daniel Leader advise me to be mindful of using plastic wrap to help the environment while at the same time he's using TONS of wood as his fuel source, made me want to toss the book across the room.  I didn't, but I wanted to.  How many acres of trees have been cut down to satisfy Daniel's need for romance?  His web site now brags that his bakery has produced more wood fired bread than any other bakery in the US, perhaps the world.  I shutter to think of the trees cut down.

To hear Chad Robertson talk so honestly about this in his book, and the fact that he made a different choice and proved beyond doubt to his customers that the source of heat doesn't matter, well, it made me admire him and his achievements even more.

Daniel Leader is an important person in the bread world - he has contributed much.  I just wish he didn't use wood to heat his ovens.

I am sorry if I have offended any Daniel Leader fans on this blog - I just had to rant to an audience that knew what I was talking about.

will slick's picture
will slick

Today, Labor day Monday 09-04-17, I am baking a N.Y. deli rye, using Rose, Levy, Beranbaum's formula. Tomorrow, I will convert her formula, to incorporate the Tang Zung method. The Tang Zung method formula is below. https://goodcookingfortheheartandsoul.blogspot.com/2017/09/rose-levy-beranbaums-nyc-deli-jewish.html

 

 

Beranbaum's N.Y. deli rye, Tang Zung method

Total Flour 563 Grams -  100%

Total water - 354 Grams - 63% Hydration 

Makes 1 loaf approximately, 2Lbs.

 

Ingredients:

Tang Zung 3% of total flour - 17 Grams

8.5 Grams Rye - 1.5%

8.5 Grams All purpose - 1.5%

85 Grams Water - 15%

 

Sponge

All purpose flour - 108.5 Grams - 19%

Rye flour             -   86.5 Grams - 15%

Water                  -  269   Grams - 48%

Yeast - 1/2 tsp.           1.6 Grams - .28%  

Sugar -                     18.7 Grams - 3.3% 

Honey -                    10.5 Grams - 1.8%

 

Flour Mixture

All purpose flour - 351 Grams - 62.3%

Instant Yeast - 1/2 plus 1/8 tsp. 2 Grams - .36%

Caraway seed - 2 TBS. -           14 Grams - 2.5%

Salt - 1/2 TBS.                           10.5 Grams - 1.9%

 

Final dough / Baking

Oil - 1/2 TBS. -                            6.7 Grams - 1.2%

Corn meal for baking pan - 2 tsp.

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Well with record breaking heat this summer in my new town, I haven't baked much. The blueberries and jalapeno mixed well together. A simple easy, quick recipe.

Heat oven to 400-410F and heat an eight inch cast iron skillet in it.

1/2 C each cornmeal and flour

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp baking soda

2 Tbs sugar

1 egg beaten

1/2 cup buttermilk or whole milk soured with vinegar

2 Tbs honey

1 jalapeno minced, I will use 2 next time

3/4 cup of blueberries

Combine dry and wet ingredients separately, then combine, stirring the pepper and blues in well. When the oven is up to temp add 2 Tbs to the hot pan and coat all sides well with butter. The excess butter can be added to the mix.

Pour the batter into the buttered CI skillet and back 25 minutes, turning at the half. Now I say 400-410F as I am adjusting from 400F in a convection oven and find I need either a little more temperature or time in my non-convection oven. Very happy with the results today!

Happy baking friends! Ski

Yogi's picture
Yogi

Got some einkorn flour recently and did a small bake, good stuff! Easy to work with and pretty much like white flour, nothing like whole wheat with bran included. Good taste, cool color and mouthfeel. Going to add einkorn to my whole wheat batches, maybe 30%. 

Recipe was 100% einkorn flour, 50% hydration, 100% hydration levian, a litte oil. 2 hour autolyse, because.

The Internet told me to make it dry at 50% hydration or else! Crumb came out tight and dry. Probably will up the water next time since it wasn't as hard to work with as people say it was. I think they don't do autolyse so they don't know what that step does to dough. 

check it: 

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

    I used fresh milled and sifted durum flour for this bake.  My wife had made a big pot of rice with mushrooms that I've been eating all week as a side dish and I've been meaning to make a rice bread and also a mushroom bread, so here goes.

I did not use enough water in this bake and only had around 56% total hydration which ended up being way too low and caused the crumb to be very tight.  I have adjusted the formula to reflect what I should have used.

Anyway, this came out tasting great  The mushrooms gave this a nice earthy flavor without overwhelming the bread and the rice added a nice texture and flavor as well.  This one is great for sandwiches or just with some wine and cheese.

Formula

Download the BreadStorm File Here

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), Greek yogurt, rice/mushroom mixture and olive oil and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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