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Mdhilburn's picture
Mdhilburn

I've been making sourdough for just over two years now, starting when my wife and I moved to Santa Barbara. While out exploring our new city we wandered into a bakery (D'Angelo's Bread) off State St. and had some amazing sourdough. When I got home I got online and fell into a sourdough "rabbit hole" where I discover that all one needed to make his/her own bread was flour and water! I threw together a 50/50 mix and left it on the window seal for a couple days and the yeast bubbles started rising. I have been hooked ever since.

After a few months of pancakes and varying degrees of oven spring, I finally was able to get a consistently nice looking, and tasting, loaf of sourdough. I even started throwing in walnuts and apricots (familiar items from my upbringing in the Central Valley). 

Then we moved back to San Diego....

RIP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, my 6 month old starter did not survive the journey :( For probably a year and a half, every so often, I would try to grow a new starter, but to no avail. Every time it would fester into foot cheese. I kid you not, probably close to 2 dozen attempts failed. I tried changing the flour/water/temp/location in house - but all failed inexplicably. Then one day this spring, who knows why, the sourdough gods smiled upon me and a starter emerged and survived longer than a week! I had some success but ultimately it was pretty weak. Then a friend brought me over some of her starter and ever since then I've had a pretty good run and made some tasty bread.

I have used several recipes and methods from bloggers/authors around the interwebs. I'd say my favorite and most successful was the "High(er) Hydration Sourdough Bread." Maurizio has an excellent website, excellent recipes, and a great Instagram feed.  I've also tried the recipe in the appendix of Michael Pollan's book "Cooked." It's a great audio book for long road trips (I listened to it over a week traveling through Washington for work) and an even better Netflix series.

I most recently stumbled upon dmsnyder's recipe for his "San Joaquin Sourdough" baguettes. I really wanted to make some bread that would make a great sandwich so I thought I'd give his recipe a shot. I found the lower hydration/longer fermentation dough to have great body and feel after bulk fermentation. It pre-shaped nicely and I appreciated its workability, not being so sticky. While the baguettes weren't super pretty (short and "dog boney") they tasted wonderful.

This experience also led me to TFL and the greater "bread community" that exists online. There are a lot of talented and creative bakers out there. Thus far, most of my exposure and communication has been through the Instagram community (I highly recommend following Maurizioalchemybreadco, tartinebakeryibisbakery, thebreadkiln, and of course, mdhilburn)

So I thought I'd give the San Joaquin Sourdough another shot today (side note: I grew up in Patterson, CA, 5 mins from the San Joaquin river and have seriously considered naming our first son Joaquin... after the river and the infamous California bandit). 

Here is a photo progression: 

bulk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 I doubled the recipe and here is the dough after bulk fermentation and about 19 hours in the fridge.

preshape

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two 950 gram pre-shaped loaves (in retrospect, I should have split it in four!)

shaped

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final shaped loaf after 30 mins rest. My attempt at a batard. 

oven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just put in the oven with some scoring and some steaming wet towels in a pie dish below. 

baked

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finished loaves. Not my prettiest but huge oven spring. No ear or grigne to "ew and aw" about. 

crumb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crumb shot. Anyone want to go spelunking? I'll bring my GoPro! Yikes, these air pockets got out of control. Not quite sure why they didn't release through the score I put down the middle. Oh well. The texture was great, soft and chewy. The flavor could have been a little more sour. 

Anyway, here is my first post. I am hoping for some feedback and welcome your advice/insight! 

 

QuarterBaked's picture
QuarterBaked

One of the drawbacks of the hearth-style breads such as found in FWSY is that the crusts are tough for little kids to chew. I've been baking a lot of FWSY inspired bread, and so we've stopped buying bread from the store, but that means PB&J sandwiches with "adult" crusts, which means lots of unfinished PB&J carcasses. Alright, a new challenge! How to make kid-friendly sandwich bread using a low-knead, high-hydration dough, as inspired by FWSY?

While researching this problem, I discovered the pullman pan and wondered if it could be put to use in solving this challenge. I recently got a USA brand 13in. pullman pan, and gave it a try with half the dough from an otherwise typical FWSY recipe. It wasn't enough dough for the size of the pan, but baked at 350 for 25min covered/15 uncovered, it was a success! My eldest: "Wow, dad, this bread is pretty good!" (implied: in contrast to that other stuff you make us eat).

The attached photo is my second attempt, using my own hybrid of an enriched Pan de mie and a FWSY levain dough.

Recipe:
Autolyse 500g AP/60g whole wheat, + 3 grams milled flax seed, because I have it in my fridge and need to use it up. Used 208g whole milk/200g water at a temp of 95.

I then mixed in 1 egg. I don't know if there was an advantage to delaying the egg, but it was a pain to incorporate!
I then added 13g salt, 1/4 tsp instant yeast (to speed up the ferment just a bit due to my schedule), and 138g of 80% hydration levain.

Bulk ferment for 9hrs in my oven with the oven light on, then shaped into log and put in pullman pan. I figured the proof would be about 3hrs, but I had to leave for 5 hrs, so I'll put into my basement to partially retard. Oops, forgot to do that. 2 hrs later, I remembered, and thought, well, I'll call my wife and tell her to put it into the fridge. Oops, forgot to do that too. 

Arrive home to a clearly bulging pullman pan. I made a half-hearted attempt to slide the lid back a little to look at it, but couldn't get it to budge. Better not try any harder, or I might do something undesirable to the dough. I had asked my wife to preheat the oven to 450 when I left work, which she did. I put the pan in right away. . . and then forgot to reduce the heat down to 350! I did not realize this until it was time to uncover the pan. Needless to say, it didn't need any baking time uncovered. The oven spring was so forceful, that the escaping dough had managed to force the lid open about 1/4in (the same lid I couldn't budge). The only way I could remove the lid was by pounding it off with the heel of my hand (with oven mitt on!).

And you know what, despite being massively overproofed and baked at too high a temperature, it turned out well, and my kids ate it some for breakfast this morning. Crust was a little thicker than the first one I baked, but still better (for the kids) than the typical FWSY loaf. Success! 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After last week’s mooshed Altamura shaped loaf we decided not to try to moosh this one.  Lucy wanted to give it another go to try and make amends but she has been acting oddly of late and frankly just can’t be trusted - especially on Earth Day.

As we all know and 100% of scientists have confirmed, the Sun is burning hotter and hotter, a bit more every day, as it ages.  This is what stars do.  They can’t do anything else.  When Lucy found out it was Earth Day and that in 500,000 years the temperature on earth would be 100 F hotter than today due to the Sun burning hotter, she just had to do something to save us poor humans.

She told me her solution might sound a bit weird at first but to give her idea a chance and just hear her out for once.   As usual I just couldn’t do it since her idea was really off the wall and totally out of a really big box.  Her idea was to genetically modify human beings so that they would be totally covered by a thick coat of hair.

That way people could feel 100 F hotter today. Like she does in her fine coat of fur and get used to it like she has already done – no worries.  As time goes on and the Earth heats up, humans could just go to a groomer like she does and get a bit of hair trimmed off to adjust their temperature appropriately just like we do for her in the summer. 

I thought about telling her I was going to sell her to the Gypsies like my mother used to tell me when I was little and was acting up but I guess you can’t say that today.  I heard these kinds of threats are considered insensitive toward and a mini macro or major mini aggression against Gypsies.   Oddly, it is still fine to take her to the pound where they will euthanize her for much less. 

    

At least I can till bake bread on Earth Day and contemplate the day when later generations won’t need ovens to bake it.  They can just make pizza dough and while they are tossing it upwards to form the pie, it will just bake itself in the hot air to make flat bread.  Just think, no ovens required, a very green idea for Earth Day indeed and Lucy thinks this alone might save us all from the future heat of the sun – but she has to do more calculations with her climate super computer to know for sure – so we will have to wait a bit before we can celebrate.

Well, on to more important things that still require an oven today.  This week’s bake followed out usual MO of late where we start the sprouts on Monday, dry and mill them on Tuesday.  On Tuesday, we also mill the other non-sprouted whole grains in the mix and then sift it all to separate out the Low extraction bran to build this week’s 3 stage levain so that it can be retarded on Tuesday night before we go to bed.

After 36 hours of cold retard in the fridge, we get the levain out to warm up and stir it down.  While the levain is rising 25%, we autolyze the dough flours - in this case the high extraction and sprouted high extraction rye, spelt, wheat, barley and Kamut along with the King Arthur bread flour…. with the salt sprinkled on top.  We also had time to make and cool  the 20 minute, simmered porridge – in this case quinoa and buckwheat groats. 

When the levain hits the mx. we do 1 set of 60 slap and folds and 2 sets of 30 slap and folds and 3 sets of 4 stretch and folds all on 20 minute intervals with the porridge being added in on the first set of stretch and folds.  After a 30 minute rest we did a quick pre-shape into an oval and then 10 minutes later we final shaped it and placed it onto rice floured oval basket seam side up.  We bagged it and placed it into the fridge for a 16 hour retard.

 

When the dough came out of the fridge we starter the 500 F preheat for the oven.  When it beeped we loaded in the two trays of lave rock, half full of water (Mega Steam) on the bottom rack and set the timer for 15 minutes.  Once the steam was billowing the top and bottom stones were at temperature, the dough was unmolded onto on a peel, slashed and loaded on the bottom stone.

4 minutes later the temperature was turned down to 450 F and we continued steaming for another 14 minutes.  After the steam came out we turned the oven down to 425 F convection and continued to bake another 20 minutes until the bread was 208 F on the inside.

The bread browned well but spread mire than it sprang or bloomed.  It proofed to 100% proofed while we slept instead of the 85% we would want but instead of re-shaping and proofing again we baked it off hoping the crumb would still be  OK  but we will have to wait on that.

The crumb came out open, moist, and soft like a porridge bread should be..  It is wonderful and delicious,   The porridge was a fine addition  that brought the mix of whole grains up to 7.  It made a fine lunch with grilled chicken, cheddar, tomato and lettuce sandwich with the usual veggie fixings. - Yum!

And Lucy wants to see another salad somewhere.

 

Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

2 Rye Sour

10

0

0

10

1.64%

Low Extraction 5 grain Bran

10

7

0

17

2.80%

High Extraction 5 grain

0

0

21

21

3.45%

Low Extraction Sprouted 5 Grain  Bran

0

13

9

22

3.62%

Water

10

20

30

60

9.87%

Total

30

40

60

130

21.38%

      

Levain Totals

 

%

   

Various whole and sprouted flours

65

10.69%

   

Water

65

10.69%

   

Levain Hydration

100.00%

    
      

Dough Flour

 

%

   

Hi Extraction Sprouted 5 grain

130

21.38%

   

High Extraction 5 Grain

63

10.36%

   

KA Bread Flour

250

41.12%

   

Quinoa in Porridge

50

8.22%

   

Buckwheat in Porridge

50

8.22%

   

 

 

 

   

Salt

10

1.64%

   

Water, Water in Porridge 144

444

73.03%

   

 

 

    

Dough Hydration

81.77%

    

Total Flour w/ Starters

608

    

Total Water

509

    
      

Total Weight

1,127

    

% Whole Grain with Porridge

58.88%

    

% Whole Sprouted Grain

25.82%

    

 

 

    

Hydration with Starters and Porridge

83.72%

    
      

Whole and sprouted 5 grains are rye, wheat, barley, Kamut & spelt

  

 

KathyF's picture
KathyF

Well, it has been a while. Having sufficiently recovered from my broken wrist, I have finally been able to start baking bread again. I have been chronicling my progress on Instagram, but was so excited with this new recipe that I decided to come back and blog about it. I ran across Trevor Wilson on Instagram (I see that he is also here. Hi Trevor!) and was drooling over his yummy loaves and then the video for his Champlain sourdough came up on my YouTube suggestion list. I was intrigued by his technique that I just had to try it! The only change I made to his recipe was to replace the spelt with sprouted whole wheat since I didn't have any spelt. 

I was really pleased with the result. The crumb wasn't as open as Trevor's, but I may have under-proofed a bit and may have handled the dough a little too much though I tried to follow what he was doing closely. The texture and flavor is great! I never tried such a long autolyse before, so that may account for the improvement. Here is my crumb shot:

QuarterBaked's picture
QuarterBaked

I've always felt comfortable with cooking--not necessarily good at it, but comfortable--but I never considered myself a baker. In fact, until I began baking bread a year and a half ago, the extent of my baking was throwing the specified ingredients in a hand-me-down Breadman bread-machine, because, well, we had it, and I'm a sucker for new gadgets, even if it's someone else's old gadget. The bread was ok, but it's only real appeal was that we were involved in the process. Unsurprisingly, we didn't use it very often, and I didn't care.

So, if you had told me in early November of 2014 that within two years I would own multiple bread books, which would live on my counter, and that I would be baking bread and be setting my alarm early enough to make sure I had time to feed a sourdough culture in the morning, I would have told you that you were crazy, especially regarding the getting up early part. But here I am, and I completely blame the sourdough. Not the bread--the culture.

Yes, that living microbial throng is the reason I am now a baker. I previously thought that "sourdough" was a flavor at best, and probably mostly a marketing thing. Instead, I saw the instructions for making your own sourdough culture in a book somewhere and thought, "Wow, that's a cool science experiment!" Just mix water and flour together, and stuff starts to happen! Before I knew it, I had a relatively large quantity of bubbling brew, and loathe to throw all of it away, I figured I ought to use it for something!

So, without bothering to look up a recipe, I just took some of the culture (I think it was in the 100% hydration range), added some more flour to make it seem more like dough (remember, I really haven't baked before), and threw it in the oven. I probably preheated the oven, but no salt, no proofing--nothing one generally considers an essential part of the leavened bread process.

Fortunately, I only made a small. . .thing. . . as it was as horrible as you might imagine. Looking back, I think I also used culture from an early stage in the development

This is the point at which I could have chalked it up as just another experiment, and moved on. But I couldn't! I didn't expect my experimental bread to be be any good, but I hadn't expected it to be so bad, and I had to figure out why. I at least had to try an actual recipe for sourdough bread. The first recipe I tried might have been from the book that introduced me to sourdough, but it also might have been the Extra-tangy Sourdough from the KAF website. The result was actually bread. Somehow, I had managed to conjure forth an actual loaf of bread! But it was still not particularly good--edible, but rather mediocre.

How could there be such mystery and challenge to taking such a simple seeming set of ingredients and forming it into such a simple seeming product? This mystery and challenge, combined with a certain strange affection for my starter culture, made me want to continue trying this baking thing, even though I still didn't care very much about bread itself!

So I kept baking, and little bit by little bit, got better at it, especially once I started getting books out of the library and learned more than just how to follow a recipe. My wife started liking the results, and I found a friend who also baked, and I found myself telling politely-disinterested people about bread, and realized that my scientific curiosity in micro-organisms had grown into bread-baking pleasure.

It's possible that it would have remained an occasional hobby, except that I took a chance on Flour Water Salt Yeast at the library one day. I can't say where FWSY stands in the pantheon of bread books, but for me, it was just what I needed. Something about the presentation, the method, the explanations, etc., just clicked, and almost overnight, I went from making decent bread to pretty good bread. For the last 6-9 months, I've been baking almost exclusively using FWSY recipes (err, formulas), or my own derivations. I've been very happy with the results, so I haven't felt much need to try other things, but I've also wanted to reach the point where I feel like I've internalized the method to some degree.

So, for me, the next step is to become more intentional about documenting what I do, as well as planning ahead some more. (With four young kids around, if I don't do advance planning, I'll have no choice but to do something familiar.) Since I like both gadgetry and writing, I thought that keeping a blog-diary of sorts would be a way of making this part of the process a bit more fun. My plan is to keep the finer details in a paper notebook on my counter, and then post a report of sorts to this blog.

[Edited due to prematurely submitting unfinished post]

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Pane Tipo di Altamura

20 April, 2016

David Snyder

 

This is the latest bake in my series of attempts to produce a good looking and good flavored Pane Tipo di Altamura. I have continued to make modifications based on my experience to date and the experience and resources shared by other TFL members who are also working on this style of bread.

  

Total Dough

Wt. (g)

Baker's %

Semola Rimacinata (Fine Durum flour)

559

100

Water

391

70

Salt

11

1.8

Total

961

171.8

  

Lievito Naturale Madre Build 1

Wt. (g)

Baker's %

Semola Rimacinata (Fine Durum flour)

25

100

Water (80-90ºF)

17

70

Semola Rimacinata mother

10

40

Total

52

210

 

  1. Place the mother in a medium bowl.

  2. Add the water and mix well.

  3. Add the flour and mix until there is no dry flour and the lievito feels like a bread dough.

  4. Place the dough in a clean bowl and cover tightly.

  5. Ferment for about 8 hours at 77ºF.

     

 

Lievito Naturale Madre Build 2

Wt. (g)

Baker's %

Semola Rimacinata (Fine Durum flour)

25

100

Water (80-90ºF)

17

70

Semola Rimacinata lievito madre

10

40

Total

52

210

  1. Place the mother in a medium bowl.

  2. Add the water and mix well.

  3. Add the flour and mix until there is no dry flour and the lievito feels like a bread dough.

  4. Place the dough in a clean bowl and cover tightly.

  5. Ferment for about 12 hours at 80ºF.

 

 

Lievito Naturale Build 3 (Final)

Wt. (g)

Baker's %

Semola Rimacinata (Fine Durum flour)

60

100

Water (80-90ºF)

42

70

Semola Rimacinata lievito madre

12

20

Total

114

190

  1. Place the mother in a medium bowl.

  2. Add the water and mix well.

  3. Add the flour and mix until there is no dry flour and the lievito feels like a bread dough.

  4. Place the dough in a clean bowl and cover tightly.

  5. Ferment for about 6 hours at 77ºF.

  6. Refrigerate overnight.

 

Final Dough

Wt. (g)

Semola Rimacinata (Fine Durum flour)

500

Water

350

Salt

11

Lievito Naturale

100

Total

961

 

Procedures

  1. Mix the Lievito Naturale and water well in the bowl using the paddle. (I used a KitchenAid mixer.)

  2. Add the flour and then the salt. Mix at Speed 1 for 20 minutes. The dough should (nearly) clean the walls of the bowl. It will form a medium windowpane.

  3. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover tightly.

  4. Ferment for 90 minutes at 76dF.

  5. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board and pre-shape as a moderately tight boule.

  6. Cover with a cloth and rest for 30 minutes at 76dF. (I covered the dough with baker's linen and placed it on a quarter sheet tray which fits nicely into my proofing box.)

  7. Pre-heat oven to 500dF with steaming apparatus in place.

  8. Return dough to the board and pre-shape again as a moderately tight boule.

  9. Cover with a cloth and rest for 30 minutes at 76dF.

  10. Return dough to the board.

  11. Using the sides of your two hands, make a wide groove down the middle of the loaf. Dust the top of the loaf lightly with durum flour.Then fold the loaf at the groove so that the upper half over-laps the lower half 3/4 of the way. Do not seal the seam between the upper and lower layers. Rather, seal the fold at the “back” of the loaf.

  12. Transfer the loaf to a peel.

  13. Turn the oven down to 460ºF, steam the oven and transfer the loaf to the baking stone.

  14. Bake with steam for 15 minutes.

  15. Remove the steam source from the oven. Turn the oven temperature down to 435ºF (or 420ºF convection bake).

  16. Bake for another 18-22 minutes. The loaf should be nicely browned. It should sound hollow when the bottom is thumped with a knuckle. The internal temperature should be at least 205ºF.

  17. Transfer the loaf to a cooling rack and cool thoroughly before slicing.

 

Picture Gallery

Windowpane after mix of 20 minutes at Speed 1 

 

Dough at start of bulk fermentation 

 

Dough after bulk fermentation. Ready for first pre-shaping

After first pre-shaping and 30 minute rest

Baked loaf

A Slice

Crumb close-up

Tasting Notes and comments

I knew this bake was different as soon as I took the bread out of the oven. The aroma was heavenly! It was nutty/wheaty. It was an archetypal “Fresh-baked Bread” aroma. The two previous bakes both had had a yeasty aroma.

The crust was soft, right from when it came out of the oven. (Maybe I really should try not steaming the oven at all.) I left the house to do some errands. When I came home about 3 hours later and got the groceries put away, the loaf was cool, and I cut a slice from the middle.

The crumb was a bit less yellow than my first bake. Maybe this was due to the longer mix, although that was entirely at low speed. Maybe it was the different flour (Central Milling versus KAF). The crust was chewy with a nice nutty flavor. The crumb was pleasantly chewy but not dense-feeling. There was absolutely no sourdough tang, just a remarkably sweet, wheaty flavor that was quite delighful. I ate most of a slice plain, then a bit with some fresh Cotswald cheese. I will have some more with dinner dipped in EVOO and some toasted for breakfast with almond butter.

Clearly, Durum flour obeys a different set of rules than “regular” hard Winter wheat and soft Winter wheat. As mwilson has been saying, the flavor depends on the starter even more than with other flours, and a full fermentation is needed to develop flavor complexity. I am also struck by the absence of acidity. If I fermented my usual mixed flour starter as I did this lievito naturale, the resulting bread would be extremely sour. In fact, perhaps I should try an overnight cold retardation with my next attempt. Before the first pre-shaping? After the final shaping?

The lievito naturale full fermentation also has enormous benefits for dough consistency and, especially, extensibility. This lesson was reinforced greatly by several of the videos of Altamura bakeries at work in which you can really appreciate the expected dough consistency and how it is handled.

At this point, while my loaf shaping still has a lot of room for improvement, the most significant area I want to improve is crust consistency. I have been reluctant to forgo oven steaming for fear of reducing oven spring, but maybe that is what I should try next. A hotter oven is probably worth trying as well.

So, I am very pleased with the improved taste of today's loaf. I still have a lot to work on to get this bread as I believe it should be.

David

 

 

varda's picture
varda

Are you interested in learning to bake high quality bread in a busy production environment?   Now is your chance. Bread Obsession is offering internships starting at the beginning of May and running through August for 2-4 weeks each.  We are a young and growing artisan bread company.   We sell to restaurants and stores, and will be participating in the biggest farmers market in Massachusetts at Copley Place in Boston.  You will work alongside us on all bakery tasks including mixing, shaping, loading the big oven, and keeping the bakery tidy and clean.   We need people who are passionate and experienced bakers who want to improve their skills, and try out working in a bakery.   We are in Waltham Massachusetts, just outside of Boston.   Please message me if you are interested and would like to find out more.  For more information about us check out my Fresh Loaf blog and this recent article.  http://www.edibleboston.com/edible-food-finds-bread-obsession/

alfanso's picture
alfanso

"I Got Back Jack and did it again..."

Once more with my SJSD inspired rye baguettes with caraway seeds.  But with a new twist and the formula sheet, now that it has been "time tested".  For a small change of direction I decided to make these as Gros Baguettes, 450g each.  So they are pretty hefty, and I wouldn't expect to see these in many bakeries.  But it worked.  The formula:

SJSD based Rye with Caraway Seeds

By DMSnyder, mod by alfanso

April 8, 2016

 Timing

  • Day 1 – mix Rye Liquid Levain – 15 minutes (6-8 hour rise)
  • Day 2 – mix dough, French Folds & ferment, divide & shape – 2.5 hours (18-24 hour total rest time)
  • Day 3 – Bake – 1.5 hours  

Liquid Levain ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

Wt (g) +25%

Wt (g) +50%

Wt (g) +84%

Rye Flour

51

94

63.8

76.5

85

Water

53.9

100

67.4

80.9

90

60% starter

15

28

18.8

22.5

25

Total

120

222

150

180

200

 

Final dough ingredients

Wt (g)

Wt (g) +25%

Wt (g) +50%

Wt (g) +84%

AP Flour

422

528

633

775

WW Flour

28

36

42

52

Rye Flour

63

79

95

115

Water

360

450

540

660

Salt

11.2

14

16.8

20.6

Liquid levain

105

131

158

190

Caraway seeds

13

16.25

19.5

23.75

Total

1002

1254

1504

1836

 

Total ingredients

Wt (g)

Bakers %

Wt (g) +25%

Wt (g) +50%

Wt (g) +84%

AP Flour

422

75

528

633

775

WW Flour

28

5

36

42

52

Rye Flour

112

19.9

140

168

205

Water

414

73.6

518

621

760

Salt

11.2

2

14

16.8

20.6

Caraway seeds

13

2.3

16.25

19.5

23.7

Total

1000

177.8

1252

1500

1836

9.6% of the flour is pre-fermented

Method

 DAY 1:

  1. Mix liquid levain. Ferment at room temp covered, until at least doubled in volume. (6-8 hours or more).  Less starter and more flour and water can be used to get the same total weight.

 DAY 2:

  1. Dissolve levain in water, add flours and mix. Cover and autolyse for 30 minutes.
  2. Add salt and mix to incorporate. 300 French Folds.  Dough will be quite sticky throughout FFs.
  3. Transfer to a clean, lightly oiled bowl and cover.
  4. Add caraway seeds to dough during first Letter Fold.
  5. In 80dF kitchen - Bulk ferment for 80 minutes with 4 Letter Folds every 20 minutes, then refrigerate.  Dough will smooth out and lose stickiness with LFs.
  6. Retard for 2-10 hours.

 DAY 3:

  1. Divide, pre-shape and shape as logs or rounds.  10 minute rest between pre-shape and shape.
  2. Onto couche, cover couche in plastic bag and back to retard for x hours more. Dough will require very little flour on couche.
  3. An hour before baking, pre-heat oven to 500ºF, with baking deck and lava rock pan* in place.  Sylvia’s steaming towel into oven 15 minutes before the bake.  *or other steaming apparatus.
  4. Prepare cornstarch glaze: whisk 2/3 TBS w/1/8 cup water and mix into ½ cup boiling water, whisk until smooth and incorporatedDo not discard as it will be used again, reheated after the bake completes.
  5.  Apply 1st coat of glaze to dough on baking peel.
  6. Bake at 480ºF 13 minutes steam (2 cups very hot water on lava rocks), separate & rotate 180 front to back.  After rotating bake for 13 minutes additional (or more) for baguettes or 17 minutes additional (or more) for batards.  Vent two minutes.
  7. Reapply cornstarch glaze to completed bread while still hot.  Sprinkle on more caraway seeds across the top of bread.  Optionally seal the seeds with a final slather of the glaze.

alan

Spite's picture
Spite

So my virginal sourdough starter finally got big and healthy enough for me to actually use it last Friday. In a frenzy to use my new pet, I baked two loaves on Saturday. The first was a "traditional" idea of a basic sourdough loaf, with a lot of wholegrains. If I recall, the flour was about 50/30/20 between white, wholemeal and wholemeal spelt flour. It was on the low end of what I've learned to be acceptable hydration, mainly because I made the rookie error of spending too much time handling the bread and, worried about stickiness, kept adding more flour. In any case it turned out to be an ok, if somewhat flying saucer shaped, loaf of bread. I used it to make some fancy sandwiches and the other half was suitably impressed. You can see more here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/45558/hello-london

 

However my next loaf was a bit of a disaster. Determined as I am to rid myself of supermarket bread forever, I knew I had to master the sandwich loaf. Whilst I'm never going to produce the same shape or texture as something mixed at mach 3 in a factory, with more chemicals than a mad scientist laboratory, I wanted something reasonably rectangular that I could put filling in and take to work. Needless to say, I screwed it up. Too much kneading early on, too much flour, not enough proofing- I'm not sure what I did wrong, but what I ended up with was "the brick". I'm guessing most of you have had this- a fine crumb, plutonium dense block better suited as an assault weapon than a food product. I did eat it, because it tasted good, however my other half made it clear she was not appreciating it's finer qualities.

 

Somewhat disheartened by the accidental creation of this new WMD, I was determined to bake something better. Setting out with a handful of guides, mainly from this site, I was determined to make something light, fluffy and big that I can slice and eat and would be even better shaped than the best supermarket loaf!

 

With that in mind, I decided to start out easy, and went with 100% strong white organic bread flour. A bit of a cop out. 500 grams of that went into mixing bowl A. At the same time I mixed 100g of my sourdough starter, which is about 70% wholemeal flour and 30% rye flour (100% hydration) into 400ml of water. I had heard "wetter is better" so much that I was determined to make a proper sloppy mess. Newly armed with a dozen recommendations about how to make bread rise, I added a little sugar, some olive oil, a splash of milk and the salt, then mixed everything together. The overkill method, but I couldn't face my partner's sad face if I turned out another weaponised loaf for her to eat for lunch.

 

Next I decided to be smart, and follow the stretch and fold method you all love. Not how my granny did it, but when a bunch of experts tell me something works, I do it. I sat the dough on an oiled bench whilst it autolysed (or however it's called) for half an hour, then stretched and folded it every half hour for the next couple of hours. At this point it was still spreading a bit, so i gave it a vigorous stretching and shaped it into a rough log shape. It stayed in that shape for another twenty minutes, so I declared it ready for proofing, gave it a quick shaping, and bunged it into the loaf tray to rise.

 

At this point, I realised my error. My loaf tray was too dinky for the job. Alas, it was designed for a more puny loaf, and my glorious concoction was already pushing the rim of the tin before it had a chance to rise. An hour later, only the surface tension of the dough was preventing it escaping. I decided that rather than leave it for three hours (or even overnight) as planned, it would just have to go into the oven as it is, before too much escaped.

 

Oven was heated, and the loaf went in, with a splash of water to create steam. Virtually as I watched, the dough went crazy. It rose a good three inches in about five minutes- probably the most oven spring I've ever seen, even with commercial yeast. As a result of this explosive growth, my finished loaf is incredibly top heavy, but a success. This weekend I will be heading down to the shops to buy myself a loaf tin suitable for such a star performing loaf. Hurrah for edible sandwiches everywhere!

 

Spite

pmccool's picture
pmccool

Hey, it's a baking site; enough with the sniggering already.

So I had this post about half-written and managed to blow it away with an ill-placed click of the mouse.  Since I don't feel like recreating it, this will be the condensed version.

It's warm enough for grilling and smoking to begin in earnest.  That means buns are coming to the fore again.

Sunday's bake featured Kaiser rolls, built from the Medium Vienna dough from Inside the Jewish Bakery.  One small lapse of attention resulted in using too much diastatic wheat malt but the rolls came out wonderfully in spite of that.  If anything, the aroma and flavor benefitted from the malt and I dodged a bullet in that it did not cause gumminess in the crumb.  Shaping is a whole 'nother story.  Despite the illustrations and instructions in the book, not to mention a video on TFL of Norm klopping out some Kaiser rolls, mine look messy.  Ah, well, it was the first attempt.  The next one will be better.  The remarkable thing was how fast the dough fermented at every stage; during kneading, the bulk ferment, and the final ferment.  The malt is apparently a turbo booster for the yeast because my kitchen temperature was only 72F.

The brioche rolls were a derivative of a post on Flour Arrangements, which is itself an adaptation from The Joy of Cooking.  I opted to reduce the eggs in the dough from three to two and to reduce the butter from 3/4 cup to 1/2 cup, as well as using all bread flour.  Since I chose to make this by hand instead of using the mixer, the butter additions (I did four at 2 tablespoons each, rather than eight at 1 tablespoon each in the instructions) made for some interesting times as the dough came apart and then started absorbing the butter.  With each addition, the dough got more and more jiggly.  The gluten was developed well enough that it held its shape but the texture felt increasingly pillowy.

Here's a picture of the finished rolls:

The brioche buns benefit cosmetically from an egg wash and a steadier hand with such a basic shape.  The Kaiser rolls, well, did I mention that they taste really good?

I'm sure that there will be more of each as the summer rolls along.

Paul

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