The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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wassisname's picture
wassisname

This week I tried the Cromarty Cob from Bread Matters by Andrew Whitley.  The element that makes the bread distinct is the use of a healthy dose of rye starter instead of wheat starter to kick-off the fermentation.  Aside from that, this bread could be put together in whatever way suits your taste.  I decided that my taste would be well served by the formula as written (and I was not disappointed!).  The flour blend is a 50/50 mix of whole wheat and white flours.  For the whole wheat component I used freshly milled hard red wheat, and for the white component I followed the recommendation in the book – AP flour in the leaven and bread flour in the final dough.  I didn’t change much, but I did double the formula to end up with one great, big loaf (about 2kg of dough).  I also reduced the water by just a touch, fermented a little cooler and baked a little hotter.

I couldn’t resist the "C" for Cromarty scoring.  Actually, I appreciate the suggestion, because I still have the hardest time deciding how to score my loaves!  I decided to snip it in with scissors - I didn't trust myself to get it right with a blade.  I think the effect was pretty nice.

The result was great.  A hearty loaf with a soft crumb and substantial crust.  Though, I think the crust would have been even better with a hotter bake.  The rye sour adds an extra dimension to what would already be a flavorful loaf.  The only problem I had was underestimating the vigor of a liquid rye sourdough.  The 200% hydration rye sour ferments at an astonishing rate compared to my stiff whole wheat starter.  My first attempt at this loaf was… not good.  Now that I know what to expect, however, I plan on keeping my starter this way at least until the weather gets hot.  The aroma of the rye starter alone is worth it!  I can’t believe I didn’t try this sooner.

Marcus

 

 

BobS's picture
BobS

Some days you're the hydrant.

This one was a dog day. Baguettes with poolish from Hamelman, but a little bit wetter. This baguette stuff is tricky.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

It is Friday and pizza was in order. I wanted to try a different crust from last time . I made up a batch of Sullivan Bread dough yesterday. This AM it was full of bubbles. I divided it into 4 pieces and tossed them with Durum flour and placed them in containers in the fridge. At 3 PM I took two out, just as we got back from our 25 mi bike ride. At 5 PM I put the oven on with the steel in place 6 " below the broiler. Temp set to 550. At 5:45 I turned on the broiler to high/550. The dough balls stretched so easily I thought there must be some mistake :)  I topped with a smear of sauce a  bit of pepperoni and some fresh mozz and asiago. Into the oven they went ..I turned off the broiler and put it on surround  ( a Miele setting that resembles the brick oven...their description) at 4 minutes the first pizza was done !  I took it out and R cut it while I topped #2 and placed it in the oven. I didn't turn the broiler back on till the last minute...perfection. The bottom crust has the best char and it is crisp !!  

And...the best part...the Durum flour was so perfect as a non-stick surface that I was able to slide those babies right from  the peel to the steel and no swearing or mess ensued !!  Amazing. There are two balls aging in the fridge. I am going to do them Sunday night for Chef son and see what he thinks :) 

#!  photo IMG_6935_zps640e7080.jpg #2  photo IMG_6934_zps44712119.jpg perfect char on the bottom !  photo IMG_6937_zpsa4ffceb3.jpg

Skibum's picture
Skibum

I again used my YW/ SSD levains to make a pulla dough. Having chocolate butter cream and cinnamon sugar ITJB, sliced almonds and chopped hazelnuts on hand, I rolled the dough out as a babka. The Kranz variation as I Googled, involves cutting the rolled up babka in two and twisting the stands together. Then I folded it into a loaf pan. Oh my!

Happy baking, Brian 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This would sort of be our everyday sandwich bread if we had one t least one with a crumb that doesn’t have bits of seeds, nuts and fruits in it.   We do like bits of stuff in the crumb a lot but we have been working on improving the tastes of Lucy’s take on  Josh’s more whole grain version of Pain Maggione.

 

So now we are up to near 60% whole grains with spelt, wheat, rye, barley and Kamut as the whole grains.  We also included our favorite flavor enhancers including; Toadies, ground; sesame and flax seeds, a bit of honey, some red and white malt and, on the liquid side, some grain berry and dried fig soaker waters…. to pump the taste volume of the crust and crumb.

 

Sadly since we changed our counter ferment after shaping from none to 1 hour, our normal 12 hour retard of the shaped loaves was about 1 hour too long but we didn’t get around to balking the bread until the 14 hour mark.

 

Because we are old, got busy dong something else and forget to bake it at the 12 hour mark, when it was 92.37% proofed,   it was easily well over 100% proofed when we finally baked it - instead of the 85% that we like.  So, it was too pooped to pop and we just got a little bloom during steaming.  But, on the bright side it didn’t collapse either… so the crumb should hopefully be OK.

 

One of the other things we changed is that we scheduled the 3 stage levain build (from our 66% hydration multigrain starter that has been in the fridge for a week)  to only end up with a 6 hour retard after the 3rd stage had risen 100% on the counter as opposed to our usual retard of 24 hours after the 3rd stage has risen 25%.

 

We also changed the development to 5 minutes of slap and folds flowed by 1 set of 12 slaps and 1 set of 8 slaps all on 12 minute increments.  We then only did 2 sets of stretch and folds on 15 minute increments before pre-shaping and shaping the dough into an oval.

 

This dough was great to work with even though it was 85% hydration.  It never stuck to the counter and likely could have taken on a few more grams of liquid.  Getting the skin tight was no problem at all.

 

After the hour on the counter, which we will not do next time, into the fridge it went for its scheduled 12 hour retard that should have been 10 but ended up being 14, counting the hour it set in the cold waiting for the oven to get  ready.

 

We really put the spurs to the MAGA Steam by using (2) of Sylvia’s pans with rolled up kitchen towels and  one larger laa rock an ala David Snyder, all half full of water.  The steam went in at the 525 F mark as Big Old Betsy heated up.   By the time BOB beeped, saying she was at 550 F 15 minutes later, the steam was billowing and the top and bottom baking stones were caught up with the oven temperature.

 

We upended the basket on parchment paper on a peel, slashed the dough gently so not to cause a collapse and slid the dough onto the bottom stone, closed the oven door and turned the oven down to 500 F.  After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 475 F remembering that BOB always thinks she is  25 F more than she really is.

 

After 14 minutes the steam was removed and the oven turned down to 425 F - convection this time.  The bread baked for another 12 minutes and it read 203 F when the oven was turned off.  2 minutes later is was 205 F when the oven door was cracked ajar and 3 minute later it read 207 F when it was removed to the cooling rack.

 

How did that flan get in there?

Once again, because of the whole grains, the blisters everywhere but were on the small side, unlike white bread where the blisters are gigantic.  The fig soaker water really put the mahogany color on this crust like dried fruit soaker waters used as dough liquids seem to do most always.

 

Don't ever forget that great salad.

This crust was nice and crisp when it came out of the oven and the bread smelled terrific too.  Can’t wait to cut into it later and see how it holds up to the bruschetta we have planned for dinner, with the mix seafood ceviche, crab cake and sausage sliders with flan for desert.

Yep.....It's and Irish Ruben with homemade mustard adn Dubliner Kerrygold cheese

The crumb came out great; open, moist and soft.   The crust went softer as it cooled, was chewy as well as tasty.  This is a fine tastung bread that is hearty and healty not to metion perfect for bruschetta.  We had a fine dinner but forgot to take pictures - everything was so good we didn't want to get slowed down with pictures.  The flan was the show stopper.

Formula

Nothing like a home made winter squash pie to bring on the summer!

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

RyeSD Starter

10

0

0

10

1.80%

Whole Rye

2

0

12

18

3.91%

Whole Kamut

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Whole Wheat

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Whole Barley

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Whole Spelt

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Water

10

20

40

70

15.22%

Total

30

40

100

170

36.96%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

95

20.65%

 

 

 

Water

75

16.30%

 

 

 

Hydration

78.95%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.48%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Mixed Whole Grain

185

40.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.74%

 

 

 

Water

402

87.39%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

87.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

555

 

 

 

 

Wheat Soaker Water 208, Fig Water 125. Water

477

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration wih Starter

85.95%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

56.58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

84.89%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,098

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.43%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

2

0.43%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.17%

 

 

 

Ground Sesame & Flax seeds

20

4.35%

 

 

 

Toadies

12

2.61%

 

 

 

Honey

12

2.61%

 

 

 

Total

58

12.61%

 

 

 

 

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Short post

40% Whole Wheat Sourdough

Crumb Shot

Beer and Mustard Braised Pork to go along with the bread.

Cheers,

Wingnut

bbegley's picture
bbegley

I've been craving a little burger action this week and thought why don't I try my hand at baking some buns.  After all, everyone knows that you can't have a good burger with out a good bun.

These were done with just bread flour and 75% hydration.  I used the Ken Forkish method- autolyse, pinch and fold salt and yeast into the dough and several rounds of stretching and folding.  I bulk fermented in the fridge over night and shaped and proofed in the morning.  I think the cold ferment is why I got some good blistering.  The crumb was a bit dense in places, but over all they weren't bad.  My wife and I both prefer softer buns, so I ended up going in a different direction today.  

I used eggs and milk with the next batch.

Here's the recipe I used:

500g bread flour

100g water

200g whole milk

1 egg, plus 2 egg yolks

10g salt

1 1/2 tsp yeast

 

20 min autolyse with flour, milk and eggs.

Add salt and yeast, use pinch and fold to incorporate.

30 minute rest followed by stretch and fold.

30 minute rest followed by stretch and fold.

1 hr bulk rise.

shape in to rolls, 1 hr proof with dimple test.

Baked in wider dutch oven at 450 degrees.  20 min with lid on, 20 with lid off.

It was interesting baking them in the dutch oven, I just loaded them in there like rolls.  They got a pretty big oven spring and developed crack on the top as you can see.  I was surprised how crisp the crust was considering the eggs and milk in the recipe.  The flavor was great and the crumb was really tender.  I ended up using more yeast in the recipe just to move things along so we could eat them for dinner.  All in all I was pleased with the result, especially for winging it on the recipe.

I do have a question for the community.  Do I need to be cautious with using eggs and milk in a longer proof if I wanted to dial the yeast down?

FLBaker's picture
FLBaker

The Whole Wheat bread on the left has 283 grams of sprouted wheat kernels. The second loaf is Whole Wheat with  Millet. And both loaves contained 100% freshly milled hard Red Spring Wheat from Great River Milling. The flour actually had a bouquet - that's a first. The recipes are from PR's Whole Grain Breads. Both used a delayed fermentation with sourdough ( refrigerated for 18 hours) and followed PR's epoxy directions for the soaker and the sourdough starter.  Sprouted loaf is slightly sour, soft, wheaty and moist. 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I bought 5/500g  bags of Italian Chestnut flour a number of years ago. Somehow I never found anything that I liked to use it in so it sat in the freezer in its vacuum packs waiting...and waiting..and....well you get the idea. I have been cleaning out and sorting and using up . I decided to only cook from my larder for 2014  , at least as much as possible. 

I fed my starter with rye and apple yeast water. The dough was made with equal parts chestnut/whole wheat /durum. Dough water was 1/2  whey.  The flavor is remarkable. Very full of complex grains and earthy. Sweetness as you chew. Crumb is very tender and a lovely crunch to the crust. It is easy to get a bold bake with the chestnut flour , I have found. Baked at 500 in hot pots for 10 min and then 460 for 5 min and lid off for 20 min. I am really pleased with this bread.  

 photo IMG_6919_zpsd401f69d.jpg  photo IMG_6923_zpsa8679641.jpg  photo IMG_6926_zps091f04ce.jpg  photo IMG_6927_zps6b661039.jpg  photo IMG_6929_zps0ec44798.jpg

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Ian had posted a date SD and I thought I would go with that basic idea. I added 100g toasted almonds and 2 tbsp grated orange zest. Levain was my rye starter fed with apple yeast water. I used whey for 292g of the dough water and AYW for the rest . I soaked the coarsley chopped dates in warm whey but didn't cook them down. I divided it into 3 boules. Great fragrance and very tender crumb. Sticky goodness when you get a date chunk. Baked in 500 degree pots for 5 min. and then 10 min at 460 lid removed and 15 more min. Bold bake and nice ears.  photo IMG_6918_zps1cd3db2d.jpg  photo IMG_6922_zpsdb03c173.jpg  photo IMG_6921_zps55cd753c.jpg

 photo IMG_6930_zps0436f64e.jpg  photo IMG_6931_zps382e997f.jpg

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