The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ham

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Franko had me drooling with his post and kind sharing of his pate recipe.  No question about it I love pate - all kinds.  Now that the larder is full of some fine bread to spread some kind of pate on  - it was time to make some.  The French are masters of making what they have on hand into some kind of Pate Maison - and it tasting great - especially on bread or toast.

 

Mine started with some shredded bacon crisped up in a frying pan.  The bacon was removed and half the bacon fat removed with it.  A half an onion was cramelized in the bacon fat, 3 sliced mushrooms added 3/4 th of the way to caramelization.  At the end a minced garlic clove was added to the caramelized veg and 3 leaves of shredded Swiss chard tossed in to wilt.  Carrot battons were tossed in as well to soften them a bit.

6 ozs of minced beef and pork were further ground in the Cuisinart mini food processor.  6 oz of chicken liver were then processed until it was almost a liquid.  The liver, beef and pork were then mixed together into a paste with 1 T of cognac.  A hard boiled egg was quartered and 4 oz of ham was cut into batons.

 

The meat was divided into fourths with 1/4 going in the bottom of the ramekin, a layer of caramelized veggies and 2 quarters of the HB egg went in next.  A whole raw chicken liver was placed in the middle and a layer of ham on top.  Then the other quarter of the meat was placed on top to encapsulate the fillings.  The two pate ramekins were cooked in a water bath at 325 F For hour until  done.  The pate was then cooled with weights on top and pouring out the fat as it accumulated.  Eventually it was moved to the fridge to cool completely and compress some more.

This pate is delicious and fantastic with any home made bread that you might want to toast or possibly a pate lunch. That is rye bread behind the pate that looks like pate.

How did that lemon cheesecake get in there? The was souffle type cooked in a water bath before it cooled and deflated a little.

 

 

mijo.sq's picture
mijo.sq

After my starter died, I figured I'd try some old recipes. I figured that I won't add another loaf bread, so I did different shapings.

Recipe-

  • The ounce recipe is the original one,
  • I converted to grams.
  • Times were orignally developed for a 3 speed mixer.
  • Scaling is for small rolls, I don't remember the weight I used for the toast.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/14607/Pan%20au%20Lait.pdf

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/14607/Pan%20au%20Lait.xlsx (Excel 2007 format)


1st Trial

 

2nd Trial

2nd Trial Crumbshot - Second day crumbshot

Single Piece


Pull Apart Toast Shapes
1. Roll flat with rolling pin
2. Fill
3. Roll into log
4. Cut in the center
5. Line the molds, then lay into mold like cinnamon rolls
6. Proof
7. Spread topping
8. Bake

Singles

  1. Scale individual pieces (IIRC, 120g)
  2. Roll flat, then fill
  3. Roll into log
  4. Fold into "U" shape
  5. Slice down vertically in the center of the log
  6. Open and spread flat
  7. Proof
  8. Eggwash, top with assorted toppings
  9. Bake

I did end up slicing them the next day and turning into sliced toast, but making another sandwich with more ham and (melty) cheese seemed plausible.

Of course (Gluten-free) cake was for dessert. 

 

chrisg's picture
chrisg

My son wants pizza.  I can't say no to him. He is so flippin' cute. He also thinks my pizza is better than anything from a pizza place. So, I can't say no. Plus it gives me a good reason to make some dough.  This recipe comes from the America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook.  The recipe is at the end, if you want to try it. I spent lots of time testing recipe after recipe and found that this one makes a nice, stretchy dough.  I tweeked it a bit.


 


Ready to Rise


I tried something new with this batch of dough. I let the machine go for 5 minutes, then let it rest for 5, then turned the machine on for 5 more minutes. I have to say it came out nice and silky.


First Rise


After about 45 minutes on the counter, I shoved it in the fridge for about 1 more hour.  I did this because I had to run an errand.  Pizza dough is forgiving, so no worries.  The most amazing thing happened, the dough became super elastic.  I stretched one so thin, I think it only had one side. THIN CRUST HERE I COME!


Balls


They are like pretty little maids in a row.  I let them rest on the counter to warm up.  Cold dough is hard to stretch.   My wife likes her pizza thick, I am kind of a purest when it comes to pizza. I prefer napolitian style pizza, so I have a happy medium that even the kids love.


Rolled out


I found that if I don't run the docking wheel over it I get ginormous bubbles and everything slides off.  That looks cool, but my stone and oven become a big ol' mess.  Topped


I just top it with a quick and simple pizza sauce and some mozzerella/provolone mix  - Into the oven with you!


This goes in...


Ready to Cook


 


 


 


 


This comes out!


DONE!


I love pizza!


 


Basic Pizza Dough (from America's Test Kitchen)


4  1/2 c. bread flour


1 envelope yeast


1  1/2 t. salt


2 T. olive oil - (the better the oil, the better the flavor of the crust.)


1  3/4 c. warm water (I use bottled water. I don't know if that makes any difference, Ask a New Yorker.)


It's all dump and go from here. Try out the 5-5-5 method for yourself (it's in the blog.) don't forget to stick it in the fridge for at least an hour.  I plan on trying it over night to see what happens.  I will update if it is good.


 

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