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Maryann279's picture
Maryann279

So I finally figured out why I was having trouble getting started on making bread at home after my second SFBI class.  It's the scheduling and planning ahead.  At one time I thought bread making could be scheduled around other activities.  Now I am finding out that it's the other way around:  you have to schedule your other activities around making bread.  It will probably continue to be this way until I get the hang of it all.  Non-prefermented, non-sourdough was usually not that much of a problem for me.  When you add in 12-hour preferments, levains, bringing the starter back to life after it's been hibernating in the fridge, etc., this turns into the opposite of a spur of the moment enterprise.  I know I can use other techniques for creating a nice chewy loaf, but for now I'm trying to work with this particular set of recipes.  Add in the fact that I get tired in the evenings and have difficulty motivating myself, some planning ahead is in order.


I refreshed the stiff started ahead of time, but forgot to leave it out of the fridge so it could develop properly.  When it came time to mix the levain yesterday evening, I decided to use the starter as it was rather than disrupt my bread making schedule (I wanted to have the bread done in time for dinner this evening).  This morning, the levain wasn't quite as bubbly as it should have been, but again I forged ahead.  I had premeasured most of the ingredients for the final dough the night before (very helpful), but I forgot that I needed to mix the soaked seed and grain mixture an hour before it was needed.  That delayed mixing the final dough for an hour.  I was a bit ambitious about the quantity of dough I made, about 2.7 kilos, forgetting I only had a 5 qt. Kitchen Aid mixer.  I forgot that the soaker had to wait until the end of the dough development process, because the seeds and grains interfere with gluten development.  The dough finally came together very well, but had a tendency to crawl up the hook onto the mixer itself, and I had to keep scraping it down.


The dough is resting now in its plastic mini-tub, and almost ready for its first turn at 5PM.  No bread for dinner tonight - maybe breakfast tomorrow AM. ;-)


I think this will all get better with practice and getting used to the methods and equipment I need to turn out ~2 kilos of dough in my kitchen (the magic fermentation number).  Maybe I will have to go back to making less at one time.  We shall see.

ph_kosel's picture
ph_kosel

ingredients:


600gm unbleached bread flour


150gm dark rye flour


2.25 (14gm) teaspoon salt


2.25 (8gm) teaspoon active dry yeast (SAF brand)


1.5 tablespoon each of brown sugar(19gm), dill seed(8gm), and dehydrated onion flakes(11gm)


500 gm very warm water (just cool enough to put a finger in and not whimper or yank it out)


NOTE: increased quantities by 50% and switched from dill weed to dill seed.


procedure:


Mixed dry flours,salt and yeast in kitchenaid mixer, added boiling water to sugar+dill+onion in separate bowl and let soak and cool, mixed on low until dough cleaned the sides of bowl, turned out on countertop, kneaded briefly, formed into ball, and plopped it into a floured(rye flour this time), linen-lined brotform bowl to rise and covered with tea towel.  Let it rise 3  hours.  Preheated oven with pizza stone to 450F.  Turned loaf out of brotform bowl onto parchment paper on inverted cookie sheet (in lieu of a peel). Slashed loaf, spritzed with water, and slid it onto the preheated pizza stone, parchment and all.  Covered with stainless bowl in lieu of playing "steam-the-oven".  Set timer for 15 minutes and removed the stainless bowl when it went off.  Set timer for 15 minutes again and checked browning when it went off.  Browned it a bit more and removed from oven.  Painted hot loaf top and bottom with cornstarch glaze (1.5 tablespoons cornstarch mixed in 1 cup cold water, nuked in microwave until it just boiled) and set on wire rack to cool.


Result:  Dough rose to fill the 10-inch brotform bowl.  Got some decent oven spring.  The glaze dried nice and shiny; using rye flour in the brotform and shaking out the excess prevented recurrance of the caked-white-flour problem.  I like the dill/onion flavor balance in this loaf better   The loaf is still not as tall/spherical as I wish, and this larger loaf lost a bit of crust when it stuck to my cover bowl, but it's great with corned beef.


Now let's see if I can upload some pictures.



^raw dough in brotform



risen dough in brotform^



slashed loaf on parchment^



raw loaf on pizza stone^



cover on pizza stone^



cover removed after 15 minutes^



loaf cooled and glazed^



time for corned beef^


 


Actually, I liked it with corned beef with or without mustard!  Had three sandwiches!

Ryan Sandler's picture
Ryan Sandler

This week I made the dough for Hamelman's baguettes with poolish yet again.  This time, instead of making three 11-13 inch baguettes, scaled at 250g, I made one 750g loaf.  Since the 250g baguettes would be called demi-baguettes, clearly this was a mega-baguette. Clearly.


Okay, fine, I made a batard and scored it like a baguette.  Still it came out pretty nicely.



Crust Crackles, too!



No bursting between the scores! Though on a batard that's kind of cheating.  Anyway.


No crumb shot this time--we had company over for dinner and I wasn't quite willing to beg their patience while I snapped pictures of the bread, the way I regularly do with my wife.  Moderately open crumb, comparable to my recent baguette efforts.  Good flavor, nice crust, though a little chewy.


It will be back to baguettes next week.  Happy baking, everyone.

Syd's picture
Syd


 


Glenn, inadvertently, threw down the gauntlet this week when he asked a question in his post: How to get a light and tender crumb in sourdough.  I took up the challenge (even though I know Glenn didn't mean it that way) and in the process got diverted from what I had originally itended to bake this weekend. 


Initially, I considered adding milk and some form of shortening, but on re-reading Glenn's thread I realised he didn't want the dough to be enriched in any way.  So flour salt and water it is.


I am pretty happy with the result and I think the following all contributed to its success:



  • a low protein bread flour (11.5%)

  • a higher hydration than usual

  • the water roux method

  • extensive kneading

  • lower bake temperature and shorter bake time



Water Roux


30g bread flour (11.5% protein)


150g water heated to 75 C


Dump flour into water.  Stir until smooth.  Cover tightly with cling film.  Allow to cool to room temp.  Refrigerate overnight.


 


Sourdough Starter


30g ripe sourdough starter @ 100% hydration


50g WW flour


10g rye flour


60g water


Mix until smooth and leave to ferment for about 8 hours or until just about to peak.


 


Main Dough


180g water roux (pass it through a sieve if there are any lumps)


150g sourdough starter @ 100% hydration


170g water


1 level tsp diastatic malt


Whisk the above until well incorporated.  Now add:


420g bread flour (11.5% protein)


Mix to shaggy mass.  Autolyse for 50 mins.  Now add:


9g salt


Now you have to knead until you get a really good windowpane.  I don't have a stand mixer, so that meant hand mixing for a long time.  I didn't time it exactly, but if I had to guess, I would say that I spent anywhere from 30 to 40 minutes kneading.  If I had a stand mixer I would have developed the dough even more, but I don't and I was getting tired, so I stopped. Unfortunately, there was no one on hand to help me take a pic of that windowpane. Pity, because I can't see myself doing that again in a hurry.  Of all the changes I made to my regular recipe, I think the additional kneading made the least difference.  Perhaps after all that time it still wasn't developed enough.  Maybe I would have noticed a bigger difference if I had used a mixer.


Bulk Ferment


2 hours with S&F at 50 and 100 mins respectively


Pre-shape.  Rest 20 mins.  Shape.  Retard overnight.  Usually, I three quarter prove before I retard, but it was getting late, so this one went straight into the fridge.


Bake


210 C with steam for 20 mins.  190 C without steam for 25 mins.  Usually, those temps would be 230 C for 20 and 200 C for 35 mins.  Then I would switch the oven off and let the bread dry out with the door cracked open for another 5 mins.  This time I didn't do that because I didn't want the crumb to get dry.  The internal temp was 209 F.



The crust was a bit thinner than usual due to the reduced baking time and lower temperatures.  The crumb is beautifully tender and moist.


 



This is a nice tasting bread with a mild, but surprisingly evident, wheaty flavour despite there only being 50g of WW in the recipe.


Syd


 


 

oceanicthai's picture
oceanicthai

         


Another 7-grain seeded sourdough boule.  I am amazed how much the temperature affects the dough.  The raise on this loaf was slow, but not as disasterous as the boule I tried to make 2 days earlier.  We had a freak cold weather front come in, dropping from high 90's to high 50's.  For Thailand, that is a freak weather drop...I realize for many both are pretty balmy.  Anyway, I had one loaf that refused to rise...I eventually baked it anyway and it was awful.  Even though I had added salt I was concerned that it would turn to grey mush with too much enzymatic activity.  Outside was flat, inside was raw.  I gave it to the dogs.  This loaf is better, because the temperature is up to the 80's now.  Tomorrow is supposed to be normal weather, in the 90's again, so tomorrow's loaf will probably be big and fluffy as usual.  Next month, April, is hot season...past the temps where the yeast & lactobacillus is supposed to die...should be interesting. 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I purchased some Pakistani Wheat (for Atta) , and i wanted to see how it fairs in Peter Reinhart's Wholegrain Recipes. I'am not sure of the protein content of This wheat, but i read that Atta flour is between 11.5% to 13% Protein. I milled the berries, and found them to be medium hard. The resultant flour made a coherent smooth dough, and delayed fermentation helped strengthen the dough even more.


Adding Milk, Butter and Honey, helped soften the dough further, and the result was a pliable soft dough that passed windowpane test.


PR's Recipe for this sandwich bread is a real winner, as this 100% wholewheat is transformed into a very fluffy and light loaf which was a true treat, especially when toasted!


I shaped my dough into a tight sandwich load in the manner that Txfarmer does hers as i wanted that shredable texture. My shaping needs improvement.


The flavor was Superb!




 

arlo's picture
arlo

Though I haven't posted about bread in a while, I have my reasons. No, I am still working at the bakery baking bread daily which hasn't made me bread-sick. I still am studying to complete my degree (end of this fall it looks like!) but I make time for the important things in life (like baking!). But what is keeping me away from bread is that I am working towards my American Culinary Federation Certified Pastry Chef title, which I hope to obtain this year. What that means is I have been baking a lot of genoise cakes, cookies and attempting Bavarian cream. Since those are the required pastries to be made for the practical examination.


Today, after getting off my shift I went ahead and made some molded Bavarian cream which is actually still in the fridge due to other time restrictions and appointments, but also went ahead and changed my game plan when it came to my cookies. I decided against my original molasses and oatmeal raisin cookies and went for the more familiar. Although I am still sticking with my two brownie recipes I decided. It's not that my molasses or oatmeal raisin recipe were bad, it's just I thought I should pay homage to the bakery that has taken me in and taught me so much.


I took a look at some of my aforementioned baking knowledge from working at a bakery that promotes whole grains and decided to make a two cookies using 100% whole wheat flour. They are different than what I make at the bakery by a long shot, but they remain true to using entirely whole grains.


 


WholeWheatOatNChoc


The end result was a deliciously chewy whole wheat oatmeal cookie, and whole wheat oatmeal chocolate chip cookie! I made roughly four dozen, two and half went to my fiances work to be shared (they see lots and lots of my pastries from homemade poptarts, cakes to truffles) and the other half will be for her father, who is in the armed forces and is going overseas to the middle east again this month.


I am very pleased with the taste and texture and am glad I went with something I am familiar with. I think it will bring along confidence when it is time to step up to the plate.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder


 


 


This is the “80 Percent Rye with Rye Flour Soaker” from Jeffrey Hamelman's “Bread.” It's a wonderful bread about which I've blogged before. (Sweet, Sour and Earthy: My new favorite rye bread) These loaves were made applying a number of tips and tricks contributed by a number of TFL members, and I have to say, I was pleased with the results of every tip I used. So, a big “Thank you!” to MiniO, hansjoakim, nicodvb and the other rye mavens who contributed them.


I followed the formula and methods according to Hamelman, with the following techniques added:




  1. Rather than dividing and shaping on a floured board with floured hands, I wet the board, my hands and my bench knife. I kept all of these wet, and experienced much less sticking of this very sticky dough to the everything it touched.




  2. I shaped the boules “in the air,” rather than on the board. Again, less dough sticking to the board, and I think I got a smoother loaf top without tears.




  3. I proofed the loaves in brotformen, floured as usual with a rice flour/AP mix, with the seams down. This results in the loaves opening at the seams, yielding a lovely chaotic top to the loaves and no bursting of the sides.






I am very happy with these loaves. I'll continue to use these techniques and recommend them to others struggling with high-hydration, high-percentage rye breads.


David


 


 


 

proth5's picture
proth5

 


Once again Captain Kirk has saved the Federation.  A new shipment of quadrotriticale will be delivered to  Sherman's Planet.  But how are they to eat it?  Yes, it can be cooked liked rice or flaked and cooked into porridge.  But what if the good people of Sherman's Planet want sammiches?  What are they to do?


In the spirit of "never give up - never surrender" (uh - a different space epic) I am determined to create a formula to bake triticale bread. Thinking over the dense but tender crumb of an earlier try and determined to apply things that I have learned about dealing with less than "perfect" wheat varieties, I formulated a plan.  I was thinking a mildly enriched bread baked in a pan.  The Bob's Red Mill folks suggested treating the dough like wheat dough except letting it rise only once, shape, proof and bake.  I remembered that the dough really behaved like a rye dough and pondered that I should not do the first rise, but considered that the miller should know.


The formula is as follows:


 

Total Dough Ingredients

 

 

Percent of Flour in Levain

0.3

 

Final Dough

 

 

 

%

Wt

UOM

%

WT

UOM

Ingredients

Wt

UOM

Total Flour

100%

18

oz

100%

5.4

oz

Total Flour

12.6

oz

Triticale Flour

100%

18

 

100%

5.4

oz

Triticale Flour

12.6

 

Water

62%

11.16

 

60%

3.24

oz

Water

7.92

oz

Shortening(leaf lard)

4%

0.72

oz

 

 

 

Shortening(leaf lard)

0.72

oz

Agave Nectar

11%

2.016

oz

 

 

 

Agave Nectar

2.016

oz

Milk Powder

4%

0.72

oz

 

 

 

Milk Powder

0.72

oz

Salt

3%

0.504

oz

 

 

 

Salt

0.504

oz

Yeast

1%

0.216

oz

 

 

 

Yeast

0.216

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed

1%

0.144

oz

3%

0.144

oz

Levain

8.784

oz

Totals

186%

33.48

oz

163%

8.784

oz

 

33.48

 

 

Total Dough Ingredients

 

 

Percent of Flour in Levain

0.3

 

Final Dough

 

 

 

As you can see from the formula, I decided to preferment what is, for me, a very high percentage of the total flour in a firm levain.  I chose a levain so that the higher acid would bring some strength to the dough and a firm preferment, again, to bring strength rather than extensibility.

I also loaded the dough up with yeast, so that I would get as rapid a rise as possible.  I would depend on the pre ferment for flavor.

I milled the triticale to a fine, whole grain flour in three passes on the Diamant.

I mixed the pre ferment by hand and allowed it to mature about 10 hours.

Since this was a small batch, I pressed the mighty Kitchen Aide back into bread making service.  I am the type of person who has a sensitivity to pitch - and I will have to say that after some time with My Precioussss, the KA sounded like a little buzzing insect.  There was a time when I considered the KA to be a powerful mixer (and really, it sort of is) - what a long strange trip...

Anyway, the dough actually came together quite nicely, but always had the putty like quality of a rye. I don't particularly enjoy that feel but am starting to get used to it (I'd better - I really need to gather myself together and practice rye bread  - or bring shame upon myself later this year....)

Even with all the yeast, it took two hours of bulk ferment to get the dough to double.  Honestly, looking at the risen dough it had a nice, open quality.  For triticale, that is. 

I shaped the dough an put it into a high sided Pullman pan - brought back from Okinawa.

I allowed it to proof until double - 2 hours.  At that time the dough seemed exhausted and I popped it into a 375F oven for about 45 minutes.

As before, when I had proofed it much less (Oh, I don't write up everything I do...), the dough had zero oven spring.

What amazes me about triticale is the aroma.  The plumbing crew fixing up my bathroom plumbing kept telling me how great the house smelled.

The next day, sliced, I had reasonably sturdy bread with a sweet taste and that fine, tender triticale crumb - as pictured below.

Triticale Bread

I keep mulling over how much more open the texture was after the bulk ferment and have pretty much convinced myself that next time I will treat the dough like a rye and give more of a rest before shaping and capture all of that rise in the proof.  Rye bakers - advice welcome.

The taste - delicious.  Triticale is delicious and I don't know why it is so neglected.

The good people of Sherman's Planet will have sammiches today...

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I'm still wearing a temporary cast on my left wrist/hand, but an x-ray, Tuesday, revealed no fracture. None the less, although relieved, the doctor prescribed an infernal nylon-velcro cast be worn until the sprained and bruised wrist heals: about three to four weeks. So, I've regained the ability to use the shift-key, but not the bowl scraper. No hand-mixing for me for the duration.


Back to the title:


Some historians argue that St. Patrick was a Welshman, enslaved by pirates, from south Wale's shore, who sold him to a cruel master in 5th century Ireland. He escaped after six years of hard service, returned to his Roman parents in Britain, ultimately returning to Ireland, a Catholic bishop, forgave his former master, chased out the snakes, converted the Irish pagans, and became a sainted national hero.


Loving all things Welsh, I've always felt akin to St. Patrick and Ireland and celebrated St. Patrick's Day--admittedly only in a secular (some would say hedonistic) fashion. This year, much influenced by TFL posts, I made the almost obigatory Corned Beef and Cabbage dinner, and invited a few friends. The Corned Beef was made with the recipe from Charcuterie, a cookbook I would never found were it not for hansjoakim's review http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21880/totally-not-bread-confit-de-canard , and included Sylvia's Irish Soda bread, http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/11028/sylvia0395-irish-soda-bread (with a wee bit more whole-wheat flour) which inspired my offering. Dessert was Brambrack (a Googled recipe), a delightfully different fruit cake (made with dried, but not candied fruit):a traditional Irish celebratory cake.


So once again, TFL, thanks!


David G

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