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louie brown's picture
louie brown

...minus the yeast, with a hand chopped 100% skirt steak burger and her friend onion rings.


This is essentially a savory brioche dough. I didn't see the need for the yeast. There's a 24 hour preferment (I did most of it in the fridge,) another one for the dough, which is very highly developed by mixer. The long fermentations contribute a lot of flavor that would be missing due to the intensive mix, which is the thing that strengthens the dough and gives it its beautiful even crumb.


This is a great bun or roll for a special filling of commensurate richness. The skirt steak filled that bill. If I wanted a bun for pulled pork or brisket, it would be a different one.


Sourdough makes a fantastic batter for frying. Add club soda, salt, that's it. The results are super crisp. I'm planning to use this batter again in a couple of days for whole clams.





Syd's picture
Syd


Poolish

250g all purpose flour
250g water
1/16 - 1/8 of a tsp yeast (more if it is cold, less if it is hot)

Mix together and leave for 12 hours.

Dough

300g white bread flour 
130g milk (scalded)
unsalted butter 6g
10g salt
3g instant yeast
a little less than 1/4 tsp of ascorbic acid


[Hydration = 69%]

Scald milk and add butter and salt to it. Stir until dissolved. Allow milk to cool to room temp.  Add to poolish, then add dry ingredients.

Knead for 5mins - rest for 5mins - knead for 5mins. Allow to proof until doubled. A stretch and fold half way through fermentation is necessary not so much for gluten strength, as it is to degas the dough.  Pre-shape. Shape and put into a two pound tin. Let it rise until coming about an inch over the top of the tin. (My tin is a 10x19x11cm 900g loaf tin).

Bake at 230 C with steam for 15 mins and without steam at 190 C for 35 mins. Remove from tin for last 10 mins .


 



This loaf has a crisp crust and a tender, moist crumb.  It toasts very evenly and makes a good sandwich.  It keeps well, too.


Syd


 

yaunae1432's picture
yaunae1432

Ok, so I just made my first ever sourdough bread.  My pet (starter) took over a week to ferment since it's cool up here.  Surprisingly, my starter was perfect (thanks to some advice from my grandpa).  I let it sit in the fridge for about a week and, once we ran out of our other breads (I have a sister who bakes bread also), I decided it was time to bust out the starter and test my skills.  I followed some recipe on the Internet...probably not that smart but it seemed pretty legit and it was made in a really old-fashioned way.  I know alot about the chemistry of baking, the gluten and yeast, the ethanol and carbon dioxide..so I was really careful making this.  I let it rise about 12 hours, turned it out, and let it rise another 5.  The baking was a different story. I wasn't sure about the temperature because the recipe I followed called for an iron-cast dutch pan and I don't have one of those and I can't buy one (college) so I kind of browsed around. I baked it at 325 for about 30 minutes and when it was still really doughy I upped it to 425 (the original temp it called for) and it took about an hour to cook. It's still kind of doughy in the middle but it's nice and crunchy! I wish I cuold use steam in my oven but it breaks a seal on the outside and just lets the steam out. Better luck next time? 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is My First Ciabatta Ever. The Preferment was not fermented thoroughly, which had some impact on the final color of the bread. The flavor is close to Hamelman's Baguette with poolish, very nutty, creamy! It is a hassle to go through, for the first time. Its a good change from wholegrain breads.





 


 


 

oceanicthai's picture
oceanicthai

Today's bake was another 3 day sourdough with whole wheat and wheat germ.  The crumb wasn't as open as I'd like, but the crust was as lovely as usual with my Thai-style La Cloche, a terra cotta pot with lid.  I soak the lid before I heat up the pot and it steams the bread lovely.  The wheat germ soaked up a LOT of water and if I make this recipe again I will add more water.  It is delicious, interestingly, this time the sourdough is quite pronounced.  I was kind of nervous to do the refrigerated bulk ferment/retardation with the wheat germ because I had read about so much enzyme activity with the wheat germ, but it seemed okay, no grey mush.  I love the inspiration for this bread, San Francisco sourbread, I grew up in S.F. and the Bay Area until my teen years, which were spent in the Sierra Foothills.  For my next breads I'd like to start trying seeds on my dough.  I wonder if I should steam my dough less when I use the seeds?  I love TFL because whatever obscure piece of information I'm looking for is here, and so much more than I ever imagined I'd want to know!



emilytabm's picture
emilytabm

Hi All!


I am a young entrepreneur in the midst of planning a bakery. I am seeking advice from every source I can regarding product, business, startup and really anything relating to the baking business.


I would be extremely grateful for any comments/ inupt from the many talented members of The Fresh Loaf.


Thank you in advance for your help,


Happy Baking!

proth5's picture
proth5

 (Apologies to Jimmy Buffett)


One of the many objectives of the formula development project is to gain understanding of the baking process.  I have found that nothing beats working with the same general dough over and over, with very minor variations to understand the impact of various elements of the baking process.


So when comments on my last entry wound around to "intensive mix" vs. "improved mix" and the somewhat weak crumb of my last loaf, I really wanted to give them full consideration.


I may have mentioned elsewhere on these pages that my so called "normal" life contains, as a major feature, participating in the "security theatre" that is enjoying a long run in airports near you. Leaving discussion of the politics aside, it does provide me with long spaces of time where thoughts can roam free and it is wisest and best that they stray far from my actual circumstances and focus on something more pleasant - like bread.


I was idly mulling over intensive mix, when in one of those spooky out of body experiences that the doctors at The Place worry about -  The Voice in My Head (known also as "my teacher")  came rushing in on me. (It has been too long since I actually worked with "my teacher" - a situation to be remedied this year when I may be pushing it to overkill - and believe me, if you don't think I am studying and practicing in preparation for this - then I have not expressed myself well on these pages.  This frenzied activity could explain a lot.)


"Pat, please tell me two ways to achieve dough development."


"One is through the action of the mixer and another is through time - that is the time spent in bulk fermentation - and folds, sensei."


"And beyond the ingredients what produces flavor in bread?"


"Time and folds, sensei."


"What have I said about intensive mix?"


"That it is fine for panned breads where all one wants is to achieve is volume and one doesn't care about flavor, sensei."


"And why would someone who uses intensive mix see no value in a bulk ferment?"


"Because the dough is fully developed coming off the mix and many of the carotenoid pigments have been destroyed by the oxidation of the mixing process, so the bulk ferment is essentially working with damaged goods, sensei."


"Is intensive mix ever appropriate?"


"Yes, yes it is, but it will be a different style of bread than those made with longer fermentation times, sensei."


"Speaking of volume - what does bread do best at high altitudes?"


"Rises and achieves volume often collapsing in the oven since it rises higher than the baked supporting structure can sustain - forcing us to deliberately reduce the rising,  sensei."


"What must be perfect?"


"Everything, sensei?"


"You sound like you are asking."


"Everything, sensei."


"You know what to do. Bake and evaluate."


Coming to with my hands above my head and a TSA officer telling me that I could go stand on the mat, I knew what I must do.


Later, at home, giving the evening pizza crust a good twirl (my teacher once told me that this was a skill that s/he lacked and so I became obsessed with learning to twirl pizza crust) and reflecting that I had brought it to full twirl worthy development with nothing but time and some strokes with a plastic scraper, I reflected that there are indeed many ways to achieve a well developed dough.


On the formula development front, I wanted to add an inclusion in the dough and had settled on flax seed.  I'm a big fan of flax - it being the thing that produces my favorite cloth - and this bread being a reflection of my favorite things; it seemed to be the logical choice.


I had some golden flax seed in the pantry and decided to use that.  I created a soaker that seemed for all the world to be "hydration neutral" - it released no water when I put it in a sieve and seemed to have no droplets in the container that held it.  Alas, as I added it to the mix, it did release some water and the dough hydration changed just a bit. Not enough ruin the dough, but definitely a change.  Truly, I will be asking questions on this concept in the near future.


I also decided to use bread flour (not high gluten flour) as a way to produce a somewhat tougher crumb - although I regret this decision because I will now have to go back and test the formula with all purpose flour, anyway.  It would be cheap and easy to just call for bread flour, but as I have told many clients - I'm easy, but I'm not cheap.


I mixed the dough for the six minutes that I had mixed it before - I feel that I might be able to mix it less, but I realize that My Precioussss is somewhat under loaded with this volume of dough and its efficiency is somewhat less at that load.  I also wanted to recheck my dough development at this timing for the mix to satisfy myself that last week's crumb was not a result of poor dough development.  It was a sufficiently developed at six minutes.  No, it did not create the glove like windowpane as required by the shredibly soft loaf, but this dough is full of oat flakes and steel cut oats and these are going to keep that type of windowpane from forming no matter how long I mixed.  The dough development was fine, and next time I will actually mix a bit less.


What I did do was degas the dough better and put a little more muscle into my shaping. I also watched the proof very carefully and didn't try to compensate for pan size by proofing longer.


The golden flax seed no doubt added some nutrition to the bread and did create a subtle and pleasant taste change, but it didn't create the hoped for "pretty bread."   The crumb, however, was firm enough to hold a rather overstuffed grilled cheese and salsa sandwich, so I think I'll (sort of) be declaring victory on getting the crumb right by getting the shaping and proofing right. 


As I said before, now the work begins.  I will be switching out the golden flaxseed for regular flaxseed next week and have high hopes that I will get me my pretty bread at last.  But now I have to understand if I can use all purpose flour, get exact mixing times, get a better read on the soakers -and get exact weights for each type of pan and each type of shape that I wish to make.  This is tedious in the extreme and I will probably suspend my posting on this until I can organize a tasting to compare the original- original and a couple of versions of my variations. I don't know if my version will "sell out at bake sales" yet, but as I taste it, it has that elusive quality of "balance." I can taste the molasses in the bread, but I can also taste the grain- it has little crunchies, but I don't fear breaking a tooth.  If anything, the crumb is a little too light (although it passed the spread butter and the gloppy sandwich test) but by no means unacceptable. I've got a niggling little voice telling me I need to mill a lot more triticale and get to that ill conceived experiment of a high percent of pre fermented flour,  some yeast and a pan and gardening/pond cleaning season is fast approaching - so plenty of other things to do while I make tedious small tweaks.


Pictures and formula follow.


Total Dough Wt

 

72.88

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

 

 

Soaker

 

 

Percent of Flour in Levain

0.1

 

Final Dough

 

 

 

%

Wt

UOM

 

 

 

%

WT

UOM

Ingredients

Wt

UOM

Total Flour

1.00

27

oz

 

 

 

1

2.7

oz

Total Flour

24.30

oz

Whole Wheat Flour

0.30

8.1

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Wheat Flour

8.10

oz

KA AP Flour

0.60

16.2

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

KA AP Flour

16.20

oz

Triticale Flour

0.10

2.7

oz

 

 

 

1

2.7

oz

 

 

 

Additional Water

0.14

3.7

oz

 

 

 

0.6

1.62

oz

Additional Water

2.08

oz

Rolled Oats

0.17

4.59

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

4.59

oz

Steel Cut Oats

0.11

2.97

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steel Cut Oats

2.97

oz

Boiling water

0.74

19.98

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boiling water

19.98

oz

Shortening(leaf lard)

0.03

0.81

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shortening(leaf lard)

0.81

oz

Molasses

0.06

1.62

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Molasses

1.62

oz

Agave Nectar

0.05

1.35

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agave Nectar

1.35

oz

Milk Powder

0.04

1.08

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Milk Powder

1.08

oz

Salt

0.03

0.756

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

0.76

oz

Yeast

0.004

0.108

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yeast

0.11

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Golden Flax Seeds

0.1

2.7

oz

0.1

2.7

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soaker Water

0.22

6

oz

0.22

6

oz

 

 

 

Soaker

8.7

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed

0.008

0.216

oz

 

 

 

0.08

0.216

oz

Levain

4.536

oz

Totals

2.399259259

72.88

oz

 

8.7

oz

1.68

4.536

oz

 

72.88

 

Prepare the soaker -  allow to soak 12 hours

Prepare the pre ferment - allow to mature 12 hours

Pour the boiling water over the two types of oats and allow to cool to lukewarm

Combine all ingredients except the soaker and mix 6 minutes in one speed spiral (or to moderate development by any means desired.)

Add soaker and mix only until combined (I did this mostly by hand).

Bulk ferment 4 hours - one fold

Shape

Proof 1 hour

Place in oven at 375F - immediately decrease temp to 360F and bake 45-50 minutes (I actually bake about 45 minutes and then remove the bread from the pan, return it to the oven, and bake 5 minutes - more as this gives a nicer crust on the sides - but this will be one of those minor tedious tweaks.)

Remove from pans and cool.

Have Fun!

Added by edit:  I was just reflecting on the process and looked at a picture of the bread at the beginning.  I thought I would post it here so the contrast was evident.  Hardly the same loaf at all!

ananda's picture
ananda

It's been half term holiday week here; where has it all gone I'm asking, as I go back to work tomorrow.


I s to have spent much of the week working hard to tackle all the complex issues I have to deal with ready for next year.


A brief reflection on our trip to Bolton on Friday 18th February is quite calming and re-assuring that my job is a good one.   Unfortunately Faye was not in the "prize money" on this occasion, but we both had a great day out, and were very well treated by our hosts.


Some photographs are attached as Faye presented her Nettle Bread to a judging panel of VIPs, including Brett Warburton, the man in the open neck shirt, busily checking out her loaf, and asking very pertinent questions.   How cool is that?   Also on the panel was the head of Innovation for Warburtons, Darren Littler, who I met some years ago when still a student myself.   Many of Warburtons R&D team were taught by the same lecturer as me, on the Baking course at Leeds.


Faye's bread was one of only 2 loaves which were genuinely artisan and made with a pre-ferment.   The other 2 Baking colleges in the hunt both used bread improvers in their loaves.   The other 4 entrants' loaves were from catering students, and looked like fairly ordinary homebaked bread.   What matters, however, were all the students' wonderful ideas and the hardwork put in to develop their loaves.   And, it cannot be an easy task to stand in front of 3 esteemed bakers from the Warburtons Company, and present your own product, and talk about it so confidently.   I was really proud of Faye, especially when she stated simply that she used a leaven in her bread as she was only interested in "artisan" bread, then proceeded to explain to Darren how she had built her own leaven from scratch, and kept it going all this time.   Some photographs below:


DSCF1716DSCF1723DSCF1722DSCF1721DSCF1724


 


 Level 2 Baking Students have an entrance into the College "Equality and Diversity" Competition tomorrow, with a theme based on breads of the world.   These are to be made with our own local ingredients, primarily, and presented in a Cornucopia, made from bread dough.   My contribution is the Borodinsky bread shown below.   Given I had an active rye sourdough, a bag of good bread flour, and plenty of Bacheldre Dark Rye, I could not resist more baking today, with a Pain de Siegle.


Borodinsky using a "Scald"


Makes 1 "Pullman Pan"



Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

30

300

Water

50

500

TOTAL

80

800

 

 

 

2. "Scald"

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

20

200

Barley Malt Syrup

4.5

45

Blackstrap Molasses

6

60

Coriander Seeds-ground

1

10

Salt

1

10

Water

35

350

TOTAL

67.5

675

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from above]

80

800

Scald [from above]

67.5

675

Sifted Rye Flour

23.5

235

Strong White Flour

26.5

265

TOTAL

197.5

1975

Overall Hydration

85%

 

Pre-fermented Flour

30%

 

 

Method:

  • Build the rye sourdough over 2 to 3 refreshments from stock. Ferment fully after final refreshment through to sour
  • For the "Scald", dissolve the molasses and malt extract in hot water, and bring to a boil in a pan. Grind the Coriander seeds and combine these with the salt and rye flour. Pour on the boiling liquor and stir to mix. Cover tightly and cool to ambient.
  • Combine the sour and scald for the first stage of the final mix, then add in the remaining portions of flour to form a paste
  • Bulk proof for one hour
  • Shape into a Pullman Pan, pre-lined with silicone paper. Proof for 3 hours, approx. before baking
  • Place into the oven rising to 180°C, with a pan of water in the bottom of the oven. Leave for one hour. Turn the oven down to 130°C and bake a further 3 hours. Turn the oven off and leave in the cooling oven a further 3 hours
  • De-pan and cool on wires
  • DSCF1737DSCF1739DSCF1740DSCF1749DSCF1747DSCF1750

Pain de Siègle

2 Boules of classic naturally leavened bread proved in Bannetons.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Dark Rye Flour

24

300

Water

40

500

TOTAL

64

800

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from above]

64

800

Carrs Strong White Flour

76

950

Salt

1.8

22.5

Water

28

350

TOTAL

169.8

2122.5

Overall Hydration

68%

 

Pre-fermented Flour

24%

 

 

Method:

  • Build the rye sourdough from stock with at least 2 refreshments
  • Weigh the required sourdough, and add the correct amount of water to this. Blend, then carefully add the white flour. Combine, and autolyse for 1 hour.
  • Start to develop the dough on the bench with 5 minutes work. Rest for 10 minutes. Add the salt, and develop the dough a further 5 - 10 minutes. Rest for 10 minutes, then develop a further 5 - 10 minutes.
  • DSCF1742
  • Line a bowl with a little oil as a container for the dough. Cover with cling film and bulk proof for 2 hours. Stretch and fold after 1 hour.
  • Scale and divide. Mould round and place upside down in prepared bannetons.
  • Final proof is approximately 3 hours.
  • Pre-heat the oven and masonry to 250°C. Tip out each loaf, score the top, use steam, and bake for 15 minutes. Drop the oven temperature to 220°C and bake a further 20 minutes. Drop the oven temperature to 200°C and bake each loaf out.
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1755DSCF1758DSCF1757DSCF1762DSCF1761DSCF1769DSCF1754

 

It's proving hard to spend so much time on TFL at the moment.   I wish I had more time to post, but it's a tough time in UK education right now, with lots of challenges needing full response.

Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello,

Recalling Larry's wonderful cheese bread that we liked so much, I wanted to make cheddar cheese bagels (my husband's favorite bagel). We enjoyed these for breakfast today...so nice to have these warm treats on a cold, snowy day!

I followed Mr. Reinhart's Bagel formula in BBA, but added 172g of grated sharp cheddar to the flour mixture when mixing the dough.
I kneaded the dough by hand, and the some of the grated cheddar was still visible in the dough before baking.
Additional cheddar was sprinkled over the bagels after boiling, and before baking.

This was the best looking one of the bunch, and a close up of that yummy cheese:
 

The shaping could definitely use some improvement!, and a crumb shot:
  


 


I put some dill, shallot and black pepper cream cheese on my warm cheese bagel - heavenly!
(I'd mixed this up for some crostini, but it was really good on this bagel, too.)
8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill
2 tablespoons very finely chopped red onion (I used shallot)
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper


Happy Baking everyone!
from breadsong

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

I finally tried this recipe and I certainly was happy with the result. Thanks to Eric for the recipe.  It one of those that are on my repeat list certainly.  


 



 


www.foodforthoughts.jlohcook.com


 


 

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