The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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dabrownman

I’m not sure exactly but Pate Maison has to be one of them.  The great thing about Pate Maison is that it is true to its name.  As master of your house, you can put what ever you want in it so it is like your favorite loaf of bread you invented and like the best.

 

I only make this rich dish once a year, right before Thanksgiving, and it is a large one made in Lucy’s largest soufflé.  Before baking it weighs over 4 pounds, just in various sausages, bacon, ham, beef and chicken livers alone.

 

The other ingredients are a caramelized mix of 1 large onion, 8 oz of crimini mushrooms, 1/4 of a bell pepper, 1 small carrot and rib of celery all cut into cut into sticks.  The greens are a mix of parsley, 2 green onions and a little bit of arugula and chopped Swiss chard.

 

 A half a stick of butter is used to sauté 3/4ths of the 1 pound 4 oz of chicken livers in (3minutes only) with some thyme and 2 tsp of pepper and 1 garlic clove.  Cut; 8 oz of your favorite ham  into sticks and 2 hard boiled eggs cut in half.  The sausages were 8 oz each of fresh; Mexican chorizo, hot Italian, beef boudin, andouille and pork country breakfast all home made.

 

You hold back 1/4 of the ham sticks, 4 chicken livers that are uncooked and chopped in half and the eggs so that you can decorate middle of the pate so when sliced it is a stunner visually.  The remaining bulk of chicken livers are liquefied in a food processor.

 

To assemble you mix, the caramelized onion  and mushrooms, red bell carrot and celery sticks, green onion, arugula parsley, Swiss chard,  3/4 ths of the ham sticks and the liquefied sautéed chicken livers in with the sausages with a large heavy spoon along with 2 T of brandy and 1 T of dry sherry. 

 

Line the soufflé with the 12 oz of smoked bacon slices making sure they are long enough to cover the top when the soufflé is full of pate.  Put half the mix in the bottom and then decorate the middle with the reserved egg, ham sticks and raw chicken livers and then cover with the rest of mix and fold over the bacon to cover the top.

 

Make sure to place the covered soufflé (I have a lid but you can use foil) in a jelly roll pan to catch the copious amounts of fat that will be rendered as it bakes at 350 F for 2 1/2 hours.  Take the lid or foil off with an hour to go to brown the bacon on top.

 

As it cools put a plate on top and turn the soufflé over squeezing out as much fat as you can. Then leave the pate on top and weigh down with something heavy, I used large enchilada sauce cans.  When cool, keep the weight on and refrigerate overnight.

 

Un-mold after 12 hours in fridge and cut the huge pate into 8 wedges and freeze them to be ready anytime during the Holidays!  Now if Ski was like me he would take half to the smoker for an hour of smoke just to put the cap in the bottle and have a different pate to choose from!

 

 My favorite topping for my favorite bread - it must be close to the holiday season for sure!  Happy Holiday Baking!

 And yes.....You can have it for breakfast if no one is looking!  The innocent looking lunch has a sandwich what I am sure is even illegal in Canada - A Pate, Pastrami, Pumpernickel, Paddy Melt with Brie.  It might be the most delicious sandwich Lucy has dreamt up lately - certainly the most decadent.

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dabrownman

After last Friday’s bake of 2 different breads from on dough we decided to do only one this week.  We upped the whole grains to 38% from 20%  and used 8 different grains in the home milled portion of the flour.

 

In keeping with out recent process, we sifted out the 25% of hard bits and used that for the first feed of the multigrain levain and the 2nd feeding was the part of the 75% portion.

  

Once the levain had risen 25% after the 2nd feeding, we refrigerated the levain for 24 hours to bring out the sour.  We started the sprout at the same time as the levain and the berries had cited nicely after 30 hours.

 

We autolysed everything else except the salt, sprouts and seeds for 2 hours.  The dough liquid was unfrozen cranberry re-hydration liquid and scald liquid left over from last weeks bake.

 

Once the autolyse met the levain and the salt was added, we did our usual 3 sets of slap and folds of 8, 3 and finally 1 minute on 15 minute intervals.  We did 3 sets of stretch and folds on 15 minute intervals and incorporated the multi-grain sprouts during the first set and the sunflower and pumpkin seeds on the 2nd set.

 

The dough was then pre-shaped and shaped as an oval and placed into a rice floured basket, bagged and immediately placed in the fridge for a 12 hour retard.  We used a little less levain this time hoping to be able to take the dough out of fridge and give it 1 ½ hours to warm up instead of baking it right out of the fridge.

 

After 12 hours of cold the dough had risen 65% but it would be a little more than 2 hours before it was at 85% and ready for the steamy, 550 F hot maw of Big Old Betsy - between two stones.  After 2 minutes we reduced the temperature to 500 F and 2 minutes after that we went down to 475 F.

 

After 15 steamy, total minutes we took out the steam and reduced the temperature to 450 F, on convection now, and continued to bake for 15 minutes.  We rotated the bread every 5 minutes until the bread registered 203 F on the inside when the oven was turned off.  When the bread read 205 F it moved to the cooling rack.

 

The bread sprang, bloomed and browned nicely with some nice blisters showing.  The mahogany color of the crust was likely due to the cranberry re-hydration liquid.  The crust stayed crispy as it cooled and was very tasty.  The seeds were a great contrast to the open soft and moist crumb.  It was more open than I expected too a 40% whole grain and all the add ins.

 

This bread tastes , sour nutty and complex with just a hint of sweetness to counter any whole grain bitterness.  We actually like this bread as much or more than last Friday's fine outcome.  It comes of as a special everyday sandwich bread that most all would like.  Perhaps Lucy is starting to get the hang of this non pumpernickel baking:-) This is some fne bread all around.

Formula  

 

First salad greens from the winter garden

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

10

2.38%

25% Extracted Bran

40

0

40

9.50%

75% Extracted Folour

0

25

25

5.94%

Water

40

25

65

15.44%

Total

90

50

140

33.25%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

Flour

70

16.63%

 

 

Water

70

16.63%

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

140

18.28%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

75% Extraction Multigrain

95

22.57%

 

 

AP

256

60.81%

 

 

Dough Flour

351

83.37%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.90%

 

 

Cranberry 200, Soaker Water 75

275

65.32%

 

 

Dough Hydration

78.35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

421

100.00%

 

 

Cranberry 200, Soaker Water 75

345

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

81.95%

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

38.00%

57.01%

W/Sprouts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

80.50%

 

 

 

Total Weight

974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Honey

20

4.75%

 

 

Pumpkin & Sunflower Seeds

80

19.00%

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

2.38%

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.38%

 

 

Total Add Ins

120

28.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

Rye

10

2.38%

 

 

Buckwheat

10

2.38%

 

 

Oat

10

2.38%

 

 

Spelt

10

2.38%

 

 

Farro

10

2.38%

 

 

Whole Wheat

10

2.38%

 

 

Barley

10

2.38%

 

 

Kamut

10

2.38%

 

 

Total Sprouts

80

19.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprout list is the same mix as home milled flour

 

 

Greens become a salad

 

Last week's 20% whole grain bread wih scald for comparison.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We had Owlloween this year.  My daughter and I always carved a traditional pumpkin for each Halloween until she went off to college so the last 4 years no pumpkin carving….but this year she was back and being a Chi Omega we decided to carve a owl in this year’s pumpkin – since owls are something special of all Chi O’s.

 

We also decided to make this year’s Owlloween also our monthly hamburger night and we needed some buns.  Our last batch of poolish buns turned out well but didn’t have any SD in the levain for tasty keeping qualities and no cream cheese like this batch.  We changed some of the quantities of the other ingredients too but not by much and the buns were slightly smaller.

 

We followed the same procedure to make these buns.   We built the combo levain with a pinch of ADY and 5 g of SD in one build and, when it doubled after 4 hours, we were ready to go.  Once the levain was mixed with the 30 minute autolyse we did 3 sets of slap and folds and then did 3 sets of stretch and folds – all 15 minutes apart. 

 

After 2 hours of bulk ferment we divided the dough into 5 pieces and rounded them stretching them tight.  In two hours they were ready for the mini oven after brushing the tops with melted butter.

 

They went in a 425 F convection oven with a quarter cup of water thrown into the bottom of the oven for a burst of steam and baked for 6 minutes when the temperature was turned down to 375 F and the buns rotated 180 degrees to promote even browning.  5 minutes later we rotated the bibs again and in another 5 minutes they were done – total bake time was 16minutes.

 

As soon as the buns hit the cooling rack they were given another brush of melted butter.  We liked these buns better than the last batch.  These were more open and tastier with a slight SD tang.  Now all we have to do s use cream for the liquid and beat the heck out of them to make Pain de Mie buns next time.

 

We tried then out with a 80% lean burger, pepper jack and blue cheese, tomato, the first lettuce from the winter garden, caramelized; onion, mushroom and Poblano peppers and home made bacon with your choice of condiment and a side of potato salad.

 

Awfully nice loaded hamburgers but then there were the steamed in the microwave buns with home cured and smoked pastrami and pepper jack cheese with home made; Dijon mustard and dill pickle version……  also very good.

 

Angry Owl On Fire

Lucy says she wants to have Owlloween every day and we agree!

Formula

SD / Poolish Starter

Build 1

Total

%

Pinch of ADY

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Starter

5

5

1.63%

AP

55

55

17.89%

Water

55

55

17.89%

Total

115

115

37.40%

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

Flour

58

18.70%

 

Water

58

18.70%

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

115

23.96%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

AP

250

81.30%

 

Total Dough Flour

250

81.30%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

1.95%

 

Water

115

37.40%

 

Dough Hydration

46.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

308

100.00%

 

Water

173

56.10%

 

T. Dough Hydration

56.10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.43%

 

 

Total Weight

619

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Honey

20

6.50%

 

Butter

20

6.50%

 

Cream Cheese

20

6.50%

 

Potato Flakes

10

3.25%

 

VW Gluten

5

1.63%

 

Egg

53

17.24%

 

Total

133

43.25%

 

 

 

 

 

Additional butter required for pre and post bake brushing

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dabrownman

Teketeke Bread

teketeke got me going with my YW a couple of years ago and I have helped quite a few others, as she helped me, to get theirs going. Here is what I basically sent them but fixing all the spelling and grammar errors I could find.  Hope this will help all who want give YW a shot – it is so worth having another child in the kitchen.

 teketeke's post on YW is a good one if you scroll down far enough when the pictures start to appear again - way down. She is a great YW baker from Japan and I bugged the heck out of her to get my YW going.  Worked first time too - and she is a master and I named my first original YW concoction after her as thanks!

The idea is to get a slightly acidic base to start from, be a little on the warm side temperature wise, don't use any sugar - use honey instead, use bottled water, open the lid often, right before shaking and get some fresh air in the jar by fanning it with a piece of paper, shake the container often and be patient - like starting any other wild yeast

The fruit you start with matters. I started mine with orange and tangelos from the back yard because they are acidic, I left the skins on the pieces for one day to inoculate the water with the wild yeast on the skins and then replaced the fruit with un-skinned oranges and tangelos because the skin can be a little toxic to the yeast. - but I would do it differently today.

 

Teketeke's Japanese White Sandwich Bread

You want to make sure the fruit you use is organic thus no fungicides and herbicides on the skins and it has to have the skin on. What you want to do is get an organic apple and some organic raisins. People have their own opinions as to which ones work best but using both is really the cat's meow. Don't wash the apple or the raisins since the yeast you want is on the skin. I use a plastic 14 oz re-purposed peanut butter jar for my YW container but anything with a screw top lid will work.

Take 20 raisins and mash half of them. Take half an apple, leave the skin on, take the stem and base off and core the seeds out. Chop the 1/2 apple into 1/4 inch cubes. Mash half the apple pieces. Save the other half of apple by rubbing the cut side with lemon, lime or orange juice and refrigerate it.

Place all the 1/2 apple and raisins in the jar including the mashed portions. Add 1 T of orange juice. Fill jar 3/4 of the way up with bottled mineral or reverse osmosis water that is absolutely chlorine free. If you are using other tap water then pour it into an uncovered container 24 hours ahead of time so the chlorine can dissipate.  Do not add any honey at this point.

Keep the jar warm around 78 -80 F. I used a heating pad with kitchen towels folded on top till I got the right temperature and then covered the whole shebang with another towel to keep the heat in.

For the first 2 days, every couple of hours, open the jar fan some new air in it, close the lid shake the jar vigorously, loosen the lid a tad to let CO2 out and let it sit on the heating pad that way till you do it all again.

Yeasr Water Babka

On the 3rd day add 1 tsp of honey.  Keep up the fanning, shaking, loosening the lid till day 4. By that time, after you shake, the mix should bubble, easily be visible and remain for awhile. The jar lid should hiss as compresses CO2 escapes when you open the lid after shaking it.

After a week or so you should have some nice YW to bake with. To know if it is ready just make a levain with 50 g or the yeast water and 50 g of flour and see if can double in volume in 6-12 hours.

YW/SD multigrain bagels

Each week after the beginning week, strain everything out of the jar. Put 3 T of old YW back in the jar with a few pieces of old fruit say 4 raisins and 4 pieces of apple. Add more fresh raisins and half a diced apple you put in the fridge (you don't have to mash them up anymore).

Add 1 T of honey and fill 3/4th full with water. Leave on the counter. The next day it will be ready to build a levain with again. After it settles itself in, after a couple or three weeks, you can then refrigerate it 4 hours after feeding it and it will be ready and peaked to make bread after 2-3 days in the fridge. I now feed mine every 3 weeks and keep it in the fridge all the time

YW/ SD combo levain multi-grain with scald and seeds - YW will open the crumb of any usually heavy crumb.

You can replace any SD levain with YW.  If the recipe calls for 220 g of levain just use 110 g of YW and 110 of flour to make it. When it doubles it is ready to go about 6 hours or so. If you bake a lot like Janet does, or a little like me, when you use the YW just replace it with new bottled water and a little honey shake it up and leave it on the counter for a couple of hours before refrigerating.

 Happy YW baking.

YW/ SD Durum Ricotta with pistachio pumpkin and millet seeds.

 

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dabrownman

For this pizza crust the girls wanted to go back to our Focaccia Romana  crust that has garlic rosemary and sun dried tomato.  I said OK but didn’t tell them that the dough would be SD instead of their favorite poolish one.

 

We had pinched 40 g of fully ripe 100% multi-grain levain from last Friday’s bake and then fed it 40 g each of AP and water making this the 5th feeding for this levain.  We let it sit on the counter for 2 hours and it easily doubled.

 

We autolysed the AP dough flour and water for 1 hour, then mixed the levain and salt in  to make a shaggy dough.  After two sets of slap and folds, 5 minutes and 3 minutes, the dough had developed plenty of gluten strength.

 

We then did 3 sets of S&F’s on 10 minute intervals and incorporated the garlic, rosemary and sun dried tomato in the first pass.  15 minutes after the last S&F we immediately retarded the dough for 48 hours.


We let the dough warm up on the counter for 2 1/4 hours before stretching and rolling it out to a fairly decent round shape.  We brushed the crust with Mojo de Aho, docked it with a fork and then par baked it for 3 minutes on a stone with a stone above at 550 F.

 

Then the pizza white topped with, home made spicy sauce 5 kinds of peppers; (Serrano, Poblano, green, jalapeno and red), homemade pastrami and pepperoni to go along with; home made Italian very hot sausage (chucked habaneros in that), caramelized onions and mushrooms, green and red onions, steamed green squash and broccoli and 4 cheeses (mozzarella, Monterey jack, pecorino and parmesan).

 

The girls also put on some of the onion, sun dried tomato bruschetta with the regular sauce.  I tried and piece of their pizza and like this combination.  The salty, smoky  pastrami was a the killer topping for me.


The crust was super thin and it baked up very crisp - just the way we like it.  The girls didn’t complain that the crust was SD this time either - proving there is a God.   It is still their 2nd favorite crust after the exact same recipe except using a 12 hour poolish for the leaven instead of SD.  I like both equally well. 

 

Today’s lunch was Friday’s w bread bakes, one topped with the left over sausage and pizza sauce and grated 2 P cheeses and fresh basil the other the left over caramelized onions and peppers mixed with the sun dried tomato and onion bruschetta – with the standard veggies and fruits.

Formula

120 g of 100% hydration levain – 33% whole multi-grain

358 g of AP flour

253 g of water

10 g of honey

10 g of VWG

751 g  Total weight

 Overall hydration is 74.26%.  The dough also had 1 tsp each of minced garlic, rosemary and sun dried tomato.

Today's breakfast and lunchmade with Friday's bread

 and tomorrow's sirloin pastrami smoke after 24 hours of dying in the fridge after curing.

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dabrownman

We wanted to use Josh’s 4 day, 4 feedings, 2 retard levain method and compare it to our normal 3 day, 3 feeding 1 retard method for flavor and sour.  The levain rose well using Josh’s method.

 

We also wanted to cut down on the long retard times we have been using of late to develop flavor and sour.  They have been 18 hours or more but the dough was over proofing to 100% or more in the fridge while Lucy was goofing off and or asleep.  So we cut the retard back to 11 and 12 hours for these two breads and got much better results doing so.

 

This recipe was very similar to last Friday’s bake except we added a multigrain scald to the 20% whole multigrain flours for one loaf and added pecans and cranberries to the other.

 

We have wanted to try to duplicate the fine Pecan and Cranberry Sourdough that Mediterra Bakehouse, in Coolidge AZ, sells at Whole Foods.  There’s is a batard and this one was an oval. 

 

The formula shows a 3 stage levain build but it was 4 stages and if you divide the last one in half then you get the 3rd and 4th stage.  Josh’s levain build is to feed it twice and let sit on the counter for two hours then into the fridge it goes overnight

 

Then you take it out of the fridge and do the same thing again including the over night retard.  Then take it out of the fridge and let it finish its last doubling before using.  I made 2 separate identical levains for what turned out to be two very different breads.

 

We did the same autolyse, 3 sets of slap and folds and 3 sets of stretch and folds as last week.  For one loaf we used the scald soaker water for the liquid and incorporated the multigrain berries on the first set of S&F’s.  We used the cranberry re-hydration water for the liquid on the 2nd loaf and incorporated the cranberries on the frist set of S&F’s and the pecans on the 2nd one.

 

The color of the cranberry liquid tinted the 2nd loaf a little bit maroon and it became more so after the cranberries were added and folded it.  The sugar from the cranberry water added some color to the crust and, as a result, when it baked up the color was much darker mahogany than the loaf with the scald but with smaller blisters.  The other loaf baked up a beautiful large blistered brown with its tic- tac- toe slash.

 

Both the loaves were baked in the big GE between 2 stones with steam starting at 550 F for 2 minutes then 2 minutes at 500 F then 8 minutes at 475 F.  The steam was removed and the bread continued to bake a 425 F convection this time for another 25 minutes until it reached 205 F on the inside.


We caught both of these loaves at 85% -90% proof so they sprang and bloomed beautifully.  From the outside these are two of the best looking loaves Lucy has managed of late and the 12 hour mark for the retard is the way to go – no more 18-24 retards for Lucy - no matter how much better they might taste.  We will have to wait on the crumb shots and the tasting until later.

 

We held back some of the levain to make a pizza for tonight or tomorrow’s dinner and this amount was deducted from the formula below.

The crumb on both breads was open, very soft and moist,  The  scald, more plainer bread bread was very open and glossy.  Both breads are about as good a bread as Lucy can make right now.  We just love them.  The cranberry pecan bread was perfect for the pastrami lunch sandwich and the white bread was the foil for the sun dried tomato and mushroom bruschetta for dinner.  The sour came through but no more than our normal SD breads.  Got to go I'm wanting some more bruschetta.

Formula

Pecan and Cranberry Sourdough

 

 

 

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

2.56%

Whole Rye

5

8

18

31

5.29%

Whole Kamut

5

8

18

31

5.29%

Whole Wheat

5

8

18

31

5.29%

Whole Spelt

5

8

18

31

5.29%

Water

20

32

72

124

21.14%

Total

55

64

144

263

44.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

112

19.01%

 

 

 

Water

112

19.01%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

475

80.99%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

475

80.99%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.88%

 

 

 

Re-hydration Water

330

56.27%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

69.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

587

100.00%

 

 

 

Re-hydration Water, Water

442

75.28%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

75.28%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

19.01%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

73.40%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,204

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Dried Cranberries

75

12.79%

 

 

 

Pecans

75

12.79%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

2.56%

 

 

 

Total

165

28.13%

 

 

 

By replacing the cranberries and pecans above with 75 g of dry weight scald you have the recipe for the 20% multigrain SD with scald bread.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy is so excited in finding out that her Mice and Pumpkin won runner up in the Arizona Republic’s Halloween Baking Contest.  She won a gift card and this Wednesday she has her entry featured in the Food and Drink section of the newspaper along with the winner and the other runner up.

 

She has been beside herself all day yet managed to produce one of the best bakes ever today.  She is on a hot streak and I’m guessing poor Max will have hard time measuring up to her new standards for baking and companionship.

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dabrownman

My wife and daughter are the cookie dessert makers around here and they are very good at it.  We are quickly getting to the Holiday season when cookies and desserts will be abundant.  But, you need to add this one to your holiday must bake list:

It comes from Tonia’s ‘The Gurney Sack’ here

 

http://www.thegunnysack.com/2013/09/pumpkin-nutella-swirl-bars-recipe.html

 

My daughter made this batch that starts with a  pumpkin cake base and the 2nd layer is some of the pumpkin cake base mixed with Nutella and then baked.  Then, after it cools, you put a cinnamon, butter, cream cheese icing on it and top it off with a sprinkle of cinnamon.

 

I only ate 3 squares in less than a minute so my taste test is far from over but I will give this a 5 loaf rating on our 4 loaf scale.  Now I’m being called back for my beyond professional taste testing expertise.  There might are chance that these are poisonous or otherwise tampered with so Lucy will have to taste first this time.

 

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dabrownman

We are going to call this bake out WBD bake along with the Mice Guarding the Pumkin.  Nest year we will try to get it baked on the right day for a change - or maybe not :-)

 

We looked everywhere but couldn’t find any SD white bread.   So, for this Friday’s bake we decided to make one.  Lucy managed to find 8 whole grains to grind for the whole grain portion and then decided to throw in some semolina to make a 9 grain sourdough.

 

On Wednesday, we sifted out the 25% of the hard bits of the multigrain mix and fed that to the levain on the first feeding.  The next 2 feedings, to build the levain up to full strength, were the 75% extraction of the whole grains.  The entire lot of home milled, whole grains was used for the levain so that they would be wet the longest and less likely to destroy gluten development later.

 

Once the levain had rise 25% after the 3rd build we refrigerated it for 24 hours in the fridge to bring out even more sour.  With a proper food source, the labs will reproduce a 3 times the rate of yeast at 36 F making for more sour bread.

 

Once the levain came out of the fridge on Thursday and allowed to finish the 75% its final doubling, we autolysed the rest of the ingredients putting the salt on top.   We had some left over prune and grain soaker water from the last bake and used that for the dough and levain liquid. 

 

Once everything came together and at 10 minute intervals, we did 3 sets of slap and folds for 8.3 and 1 minute to develop the gluten and then did 3 sets of S&F’s over the next hour.   Then the dough was pre-shaped and then final shaped into a boule and placed seam side sown into a lightly rice floured basket.

 

We planned a rustic opening at the seam when it was turned out seam side up for baking without having to slash it.  The dough was bagged in a used trash can liner and immediately retarded for 18 hours overnight.

 

It nearly tripled in volume while in the fridge for some unknown reason and we thought for sure there wouldn’t be much spring in the DO, especially since it deflated so much when we picked it up in the parchment paper sling we used to lower it into the hot DO.

 

But no worries, the dough recovered nicely to spring back in the 15 minutes under the DO lid, the first 10 minutes at 475 F and the last 10 minutes at 450 F before removing the lid and turning the oven down to 425 F to finish baking.

 

At the 20 minute mark we took the boule out of the DO to finish baking on the bottom stone rotating it once 5 minutes later.  After a total of 35 minutes making the bread reached 105 F and was removed to the cooling rack.

 

It browned up a light red color, cracked at the seam and had some nice blistering too.   The DO and Betsy managed to turn out a nice looking loaf of bread but we will have to see what the crumb looks like later. The crumb turned out very soft, medium open  and moist.

The pepper jack cheese, smoked brisket melt, that Lucy made for my daughter's lunch, got the 'best samndwich ever and the best SD bread you have ever baked Dad' response. Aaaahhhh she nust want something really bad don't you think?  Got to love it though.....

 The crust was crispy but the crumbwas so soft my bread knife had a hard time slicing it straight without squishing.  The crumb would have been more open had I slid it onto a stone with the peel instead of folding it in half trying to get it into the DO :-)

It looks like lasagna in a Pyrex loaf pan but it is (2) breakfast burritos constructed with home made Chorizo.

This bread is very sour right out of the oven.  When you build a whole grain starter for sour and refrigerate it for  week, refrigerate the levain for 24 hours and then retarded the dough for 18 hours you get as much sour as you can manage with what you have at your disposal.  You just want to make sure that you have enough of the right food for the labs and yeast to eat.  If you want to eat white bread, then this one will fit the bill well enough. 

Breakfast babka toasted with butter, apple and berries.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

3.55%

Whole Rye

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Kamut

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Oat

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Wheat

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Buckwheat

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Bulgar

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Spelt

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Farro

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Water

16

24

40

80

18.93%

Total

47

48

 

175

41.42%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

88

20.71%

 

 

 

Water

88

20.71%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

23.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Semolina

10

2.37%

 

 

 

AP

325

76.92%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

335

79.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.89%

 

 

 

Soaker & Prune Water 180

220

52.07%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

65.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

423

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker & Prune Water 220

308

72.78%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

72.78%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

20.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.78%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

738

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Dinner has to start with dessert and this mixed apple crisp fits the bill.  Some smoked chicken and home made smoked Andouille sausage etouffee served over rice with green veg, a nice salad and whole grain sourdough bread to sop up the gravy as sides is tough to beat.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After seeing Dwayne’s Mice Bake I had to do one ….eeeerrrr…..two and throw in a free pumpkin for them to guard.  Instead of pumpkin, we roasted some sweet potato to get rid of as much water as possible.

 

The dough was leavened by a poolish, enriched and sweetened with added pumpkin pie spice to bring out the Thanksgiving smell in the house as they baked.  I’m starting to get in holiday mood even though it is more than a month away.

 

We sis out usual slap and folds and folds but the kept the hydration low since the pumpkin was going to be free formed without any support while proofing .  We baked them in the mini oven starting at 450 F with steam for 10 minutes but turning the temperature down to 400 F after 5 minutes.

 

When the steam came out we turned the temperature down to 350 F until the pumpkin got to 195 F on the inside.  It was so much fun to make the mice and pumpkin.  Hope it tastes as good as the mice looked.  They looked furry cute in their rolled oat coats. 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Pinch of ADY

0

0

0

0.00%

AP

50

50

100

22.22%

Water

50

25

75

16.67%

Total

100

75

175

38.89%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

Flour

100

22.22%

 

 

Soaker & Prune Water

75

16.67%

 

 

Hydration

75.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

17.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

White Whole Wheat

125

27.78%

 

 

AP

225

50.00%

 

 

Dough Flour

350

77.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.78%

 

 

Water

165

36.67%

 

 

Dough Hydration

47.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

450

100.00%

 

 

Soaker, Prune Water 75, Water

240

53.33%

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

53.33%

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

22.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

67.58%

 

 

 

Total Weight

981

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Butter

40

8.89%

 

 

Barley Malt Syrup

11

2.44%

 

 

Sweet Potato

180

40.00%

 

 

Non Fat Dry Milk Powder

10

2.22%

 

 

Brownn Sugar

25

5.56%

 

 

VW Gluten

12

2.67%

 

 

Total

283

62.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rolled oats to roll the mice in

 

 

 

 

All weights in grams

 

 

 

 

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