The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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dabrownman

This weeks bake was brought about by chance.  Lucy found some Turkish figs hiding out in the fridge where they were tossed several months ago.  Thank goodness they were already dried before being lost to the cold.

 

We wanted a bread that was healthy so we picked 6 whole grains to grind up and mix with AP flour to get a 50% whole grain bread.  We picked Kamut, spelt, rye, wheat, farro and barley because of its very low GI index.

 

Can you see where the pint of blueberries landed when my wife had a snack before bedtime and put the berries on top of the bread by mistake?

As usual we fed the sifted out, in this case 13.75% extraction, hard bits to the 6 week retarded rye sour starter, in 3 builds of 2, 4 and 1 hour to make the small levain of a little over 7%,  before it was refrigerated for 24 hours.

 

When the levain came out of the fridge to warm up and finish its 3rd stage doubling in volume, we autolysed the dough flour with the left over fig re-hydration soaker water and some water for 2 hours with the salt sprinkled on top so we wouldn’t forget it.

 

Once the levain hit the mix, it made for a very manageable 78% hydration dough.  After 3 sets of slap and folds of 7, 1 and 1 minute the dough was ready for the 3 set of stretch and folds from the compass points.  The wet figs, fennel and anise were mixed in on the first set and evenly distributed by the 3rd.  The extra moistness in the figs made for a dough that felt like it was over 80% hydration.

 

All the slapping, folding and stretching were done on 20 minute intervals.  We then pres-shaped and shaped the dough into a squat oval and placed it in a rice floured basket for the plastic trash can liner so no bulk ferment was done – it was only 116 F yesterday and the kitchen was 90 F.

 

Don't forget the salad to go with any dinner.... like this grilled chicken one.

With this small levain inoculation, we were hoping that we could get a 20 hour retard and still be able to let the dough finish proofing on the counter for 1 ½ hours as it warmed up without over proofing and ….we did.

 

We could only find one of our steaming Pyrex cups that we use for the mini oven Mega Steam.   Since half the steam was missing on this bake than our usual we tossed some water into the bottom of the mini oven as we closed the door.

 

The bread was upended onto parchment, on the top vented cover of the mini oven’s broiler pan and slashed down the middle. Once the steaming cup that was brought to boiling in the microwave and was added in the back corner, we loaded the whole shebang into the mini oven for steaming at 500 F.

 

Even a black carpenter bee loves this bread.

After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 475 F and continued to steam for 13 more minutes. Once the steam came out, we turned the oven down to 425 F convection and baked for another 14 minutes when the bread hit 210 F on the inside and was removed to the cooling rack.  Total baking time was 29 minutes.

This loaf immediately spread after it came out of the basket which I attribute to being a wet dough.  It did spring after that and bloomed too but it came out way flatter than it would have been if 5% less liquid was used to account for the wet figs.  It did come out of the oven crunchy and nicely browned.  The kitchen smelled wonderful from bread spice perfume - just lovely.  I’m guessing this bread will be OK in the middle but taste great.  We will have to wait for it to cool though.

The lunch was great and we are stil kind of stunned as to how good this bread is all by itself, no toasting, no butter.  It is slightly sweet from the figs, aromatic from the bread spices. soft and moist with and good chew from the crust.  It is one of our favorite breads.   This one is a Lucy Keeper.

 

Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

6 Week Retarded Rye Starter

4

0

0

4

0.89%

13.75% 6 Grain Extraction

4

10

19

33

7.38%

Water

4

10

19

33

7.38%

Total

12

20

38

70

15.66%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

35

7.83%

 

 

 

Water

35

7.83%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

7.57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

86.25% 6 Grain Extraction

207

46.31%

 

 

 

LaFama 11.2% Protein AP

240

53.69%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

447

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.88%

 

 

 

Fig Soaker Water 272

343

76.73%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.73%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

482

 

 

 

 

Total Liquid w/ Starter

378

 

 

 

 

Figs

50

11.19%

 Dry Weight

 

 

Fennel & Anise Seed

6

1.34%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total. Hydration with Starter

78.42%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

925

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

50.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 86.25% Extraction grains are barley, wheat, Kamut, farro, rye  and spelt.

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We always have frozen walnut, basil, parmesan and olive oil pesto in the freezer - perfect for putting into anything like Italian bread.  Lucy hasn’t made a pizza like this before so we were a little leery but it smelled so good baking we knew it would be rewarded.

 

The levain was a little different in that it was a 2 stage build and had 10g of our rye sour added to 100 g each of cherry yeast water and LaFama AP flour at 11.2 % protein.  We let it bubble way until it had risen 75% and then refrigerated it for 24 hours.

 

The next day we autolysed the multigrain dough flours that included spelt, rye and farro and WW for 2 hours before mixing in the olive oil, levain and salt and doing the 3 sets of slap and folds and 3 sets of stretch and folds.

 

The 2 T of pesto and 1 T of sun dried tomato were added in on the first set of stretch and folds and all the slapping stretching and folding was done on 15 minute intervals.  Once done the dough was bulk retarded overnight for 12 hours.

 

Going in the oven....                                                           Half baked....

Since this was a focaccia and made in the St Louis style for the pizza part, the dough was stretched out onto a square to fit the mini oven’s bottom of the broiler pan that was covered in parchment and allowed to final proof for 4 hours.

 

This Focacciaa Pizza went so fast we almost didn't get a picture of it!

The focaccia was brushed with mojo de ajo, the bottom docked with a  fork and par baked at 500 F for 7 minutes.  Both sides were covered with a thin layer of shredded mozzarella and then one side was covered in pizza sauce and the other side with thinly sliced fresh Roma tomatoes.

 

We loved the Chicken Chow Mein just as much.

The sauced side got a layer of thinly sliced pepperoni and black olives.  Then the whole pie got another layer of mozzarella, sliced red pepper, onions and mushrooms, grated parmesan and pecorino cheese.  Back in the oven it went for 20 more minutes at 450 F until the top was browned.

 

A Summer Squash and Smoked Sausage Soup and Sandwich lunch.  Monsoon is still hanging in there but no clouds and 117 F today - just killer!!!

The pie was sliced on the diagonal in St. Louis style making triangles on the crusty edges and no crust diamonds in the middle.  Just delicious with pesto and sun dried tomato in the crust and not your regular thin crust white crust pizza since this one is kinda green.

 Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Total

%

6 Week Retarded Rye Starter

10

10

4.88%

AP

100

100

48.78%

Yeast Water

100

100

48.78%

Total

210

210

102.44%

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

%

 

Flour

105

51.22%

 

Water

105

51.22%

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

38.32%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

HaydenDesert Durum

25

12.20%

 

White Spelt

25

12.20%

 

85% Extraction 3 Grain

25

12.20%

 

LaFama 11.2% Protein AP

130

63.41%

 

Total Dough Flour

205

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

1.94%

 

Water

117

57.07%

 

Dough Hydration

57.07%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

310

 

 

Total Liquid w/ Starter

222

 

 

Olive Oil

10

4.88%

 

 

 

 

 

Total. Hydration with Starter

71.61%

 

 

Total Weight

548

 

 

% Whole Grain

13.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 85% Extraction grains arewheat, farro, rye and spelt.  Half of the 3

whole grains were sprouted, dried and milled intosprouted flour.

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This is close to last Friday’s bake that got mooshed and mangled (M&M’ed) coming out of the Romertopf clay baker.  Not wanting to end that bake on a bad note and not wanting to bake the same recipe twice Lucy decided to double the sprouted whole grain flour, drop the non sprouted whole grain flour, up the VWG and honey, dropping the boiled potato slightly and lowering the hydration slightly.

 

Grinding twice as much sprouted grain resulted in a 20% extraction this time and it was fed to the starter to make a slightly larger levain than last time.  Tempering the grain, either by sprouting them or just soaking them and then drying, makes for a 5% larger extraction than grinding un-tempered berries.   Here is a link to last Friday’s bake

 3 Sprouted Grain SD with One No Sprout

 

We followed the same process and routine as last week with a 24 hour retard of the levai, the rye starter was a week older at 5 weeks, we did the same autolyse, slap and folds, stretch and folds and 20 hour retard of the shaped dough in the same basket and baking in the same clay baker.

 

The out come was better this time because we didn’t try to upend the bread out of the clay pot right after the lid came off.  It, didn’t spring or bloom at all but it did brown up  to that nice mahogany color after the lid came off.  We took it out the clay baker and put it on the bottom stone 10 minutes after the lid came off.  At 208 F we turned off the oven leaving it in there till it hit 210 F before removing to the cooling rack.

 

This one sure ended up looking better than its near twin - even without spring or bloom anywhere to be found - must be over proofed.  I can’t image it tasting any better than the last bake.   I’m starting to think the Romertopf is a bad bread baker or sprouted grains are very tricky to use in large amounts.

 

We shall see after it cools and we make our usual sandwich for lunch.  The crumb did end up fairly open - better than last time, soft and very moist since I cut into it while it was still warm.  It tasted every bit s good as last Friday’s bake but more sprouty earthy and near dirty.

 

One of our favorite Enchiladas.  Manchego, chicken and spinach in a white sauce served with dried pepper rice and beans.

  I preferred the taste of last Friday's bake but others may not.  This is a complex, deep and full throated taste you can't get any other way I'm guessing.  I think I will keep the sprouted grains ground into flour at the 25% level to keep the dough from over proofing during the long cold retard.. 

 

Formula

A grilled Ahi Tuna  and Swordfish dinner with caramelized rosemary potatoes, salad,  steamed veggies and chili pepper rice. 

 

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

5 Week Retarded Rye Starter

6

0

0

6

1.55%

15% Extraction 3 Grain

6

12

24

42

10.88%

Soaker Water

6

12

24

42

10.88%

Total

18

24

48

90

23.32%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

45

11.66%

 

 

 

Potato Water

45

11.66%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

10.19%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

85% Extract. Sprouted 3 Grain

166

43.01%

 

 

 

AP

220

56.99%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

386

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.86%

 

 

 

Potato and Soaker Water

247

63.99%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

63.99%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Boiled Potato

87

22.54%

 

 

 

Honey

15

3.89%

 

 

 

Red Malt

10

2.59%

 

 

 

VWG

15

3.89%

 

 

 

Butter

25

6.48%

 

 

 

Total

152

39.38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

431

 

 

 

 

Total Liquid w/ Starter

292

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total. Hydration with Starter

67.75%

 

 

 

 

Hyd. with Starter & Adds

80.13%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

883

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

51.97%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 3 whole grains are emmer, rye and spelt.  The whole

 

 

grains were sprouted, dried and milled into sprouted flour.

 

 

 

 

Lucy almost forgot  the salad

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I'm pretty sire you won't find this pie in New York City - at least not a good one or one made with this recipe.  Like pecan pie, this is a very old Southern recipe and no two are the same - the chocolate version is Lucy's favorite even though chocolate is poison for dogs.

Ok.Lucy cheated by putting in an extra pat of butter at the very end to float around, melt wherever and adding more buttery goodness.

Mine is an easy one packed with less sugar and more flavor than the usual.  Some don't have corn, some don't have lemons, most have much less corn and lemon and most have way more sugar.

Since we we got the mill we put hole grains in everything and grind things we normally wouldn't for a recipe.

The crust of this one has 1/3 cup of whole grain mix of spelt. rye and farro to go with 1 C of AP, 1/8th tsp salt, 1 T of sugar, 4 T each of butter and shortening with 6 T of Ice water - no vodka this time.  Cut the fat into the flour and salt and then add the ice water but stop at 5 T to see if it needs the 6th one,  Make a disk, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 45 minutes.  Roll it out into and right size for your pie pan and the refrigerate again while you make the filling,

4 T of butter and 1 C of sugar are creamed together and then 4 eggs are added and whisked until pale yellow.

1 tsp of vanilla, 1 can of condensed milk,  1 can of Media Creama, 3 T of yellow corn meal ( I ground whole popcorn), the zest and juice of 3 lemions.  Wisk away until well combined.  Put the fillng in the pie shell and place in a pre-heated 350 F oven ( I used the mini oven) for 20 minutes, rotate 90 degrees and bake another 20 minutes.  Rotate 90 degrees and bake 5 more minutes and then rotate one last time and bake 5 more minutes - 50 minutes total,  until the top souffles and rises an inch above the rim of the crust and lightly browns - amazing how high it puffs up..

 

Let cool and serve at room temp.   If you want Chocolate Chess Pie, then remove the lemon juice and zest and sub in  2-4 T of cocoa powder, Lucy  I uses over 3, to make it as chocolaty as you like.   

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You never know what that Lucy will come up with next and the horrid heat of the summer only makes her brain box overheat mote than usual and there is no telling if a great bread recipe will come out of it or a cup of piping hot Joe.   This time she thought up something new – sprouted grain flour.

 

We have been doing sprouted grain and even sprouted beans for bread for a very long time.  We like sprouts as much as we like grain scalds, gruels, mashes and roux.  There really isn’t much Lucy won’t put in bread when it comes right down to it but she hasn’t ever specified sprouting grain for 36 hours, drying them low and slow and then grinding them into flour.

 

We have always sprouted them for 4-5 days and then dried them low and slow grinding half to make white diastatic malt, then taking the other half up in temperature to grind up and make red non-diastatic malt.  But with the new, new thing of sprouting grain till it chits, drying it and then making flour for bread out of it, Lucy just couldn’t let this fad pass her by without giving it a go.

 

With it being over 100 F every day in the desert, we had perfect temperatures to dry the sprouted grain outdoors if we could figure out a way to keep the birds from eating it all.  Lucy chose her 3 current favorite grains for sprouting - rye, spelt and farro (in this case emmer).  The non sprouted whole grains also included the same 3 and the non sprouted, non whole grain flour was some 10% protein Kroger AP.

 

It's bad enough it got dropped on its top out of the Romertopf while soft but then picking it up on both ends to get it back in the oven was precious!

We loved the Swabian Potato bread so Lucy decided to add some boiled potato bread to the mix and use the boiling neater for the dough liquid along with the soaker water from the sprouts.  The 100 g of sprouts were started on Monday so they could be ground on Wednesday morning to include the hard bits in the levain and the rest  in the mix for the dough’s 18 hour overnight retard and a Friday bake.

 

Forget the badly treated bred and have a piece of this deep dish pizza made from frozen dough. Two layers of mozzerella cheese, bottom and top,  two layers of pepperoni with hot Italian sausage sandwiched between covered in home made spicy sauce with Pecorino and Parmesan to cover.

We dried the sprouts on the bottom of the mini oven’s broiler pan covered with the vented top to keep the birds out.  If we had put it in the sun at 111 F, it would have been too hot, well over 150 F in that steel pan - so we put it in the shade under the Minneola tree to keep the temperature under 105 F.  We mixed the grain every hour to get the wet spot on top and in 4 hours the grain was dry.

 

We ground it separately from the other 100 g of the same grains and got a darker color, larger bran and 85% extraction from the sprouts and an 86% extraction from the un-sprouted grain that resulted in a total of 31 g of hard bits that, per our usual, we fed to the  4 week retarded rye starter to make the levain over 3 feedings. 

 

The levain was retarded for 24 hours when it rose 25% after the 3rd feeding.  The dough flour, red malt, honey, butter, potato, VWG and dough liquid were autolysed for 2 hours before the salt and the levain were added to the mix.

 

We did 3 sets of slap and folds of 7 2 and 1 minute to get the gluten developed for the 84% hydration dough.  With all the low gluten flours in the mix it was a fairly wet dough and those not used to it could cut 4% of the liquid - no worries to tighten it up some.   We then did 3 stets of stretch and folds form the compass points only.  All the slapping and stretching and folding were done on 20 minute intervals.

 

Another version of Dabrowman's stuffed chicken.

We let the dough rest for 20 minutes before pre-shaping and then shaping into a squat oval to fit the basket.   We also planned on eventually putting the dough into a preheated Romertopf oval shaped clay baker for baking – one we haven’t used for awhile.  After bagging the dough and basket in a used trash can liner, we retarded the dough overnight in the fridge for 18 hours.

 

Ooooooohhhh.....Monsoooooooon!

We took the dough out of the fridge to warm up and began the half hour, water presoak of the clay baker.  We then loaded the soaked, but empty, clay baker it into a cold oven set for 465 F to preheat.   Once Big Old Betsy said she was at 465 F the clay baker was removed the bread upended on parchment, slashed and dropped into the clay baker.  The lid was put on and the clay baker was put into the oven for 25 minutes of lid on baking.

 

Last Friday's bake made for great breakfasts and lunches all week.

Once the lid came off, the oven was turned down to 425 F convection  The bread was immediately removed from the clay baker which was a huge mistake since the outside was soft and collapsed at it was turned out – don’t do this – Bake it for 5 minutes with the lid off first.  We let the now ruined bred finish baking directly on the oven rack.  It had sprung and bloomed well under the lid and it browned well after collapsing too.  We took the bread out of the oven when it hit 205 F in the middle.

 

It has been a very long time since we messed up a loaf o bread like this one so I suppose Lucy had it coming to her. But It was more open than we thought it would be and it tasted fine so it isn’t a total loss.  It made a great smoked chicken and cheese sandwich for lunch.

And Lucy says not to forget the salad.

 

Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

4 Week Retarded Rye Starter

5

0

0

5

1.37%

85% Extraction 3 Grain

0

0

4

4

1.09%

15% Extraction 3 Grain

5

10

16

31

8.47%

Soaker Water

5

10

20

35

9.56%

Total

15

20

40

75

20.49%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

37.5

10.25%

 

 

 

Potato Water

37.5

10.25%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

8.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

85% Extract. Sprouted 3 Grain

83

22.68%

 

 

 

85% Extraction 3 Grain

83

22.68%

 

 

 

AP

200

54.64%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

366

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.98%

 

 

 

Potato and Soaker Water

243

66.39%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

66.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Boiled Potato

92

25.14%

 

 

 

Honey

10

2.73%

 

 

 

Red Malt

10

2.73%

 

 

 

VWG

10

2.73%

 

 

 

Butter

25

6.83%

 

 

 

Total

147

40.16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

403.5

 

 

 

 

Total Liquid w/ Starter

280.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total. Hydration with Starter

69.52%

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter & Adds

83.80%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

839

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

53.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 3 whole grains are farro, rye and spelt.  Half of the 3

 

 

whole grains were sprouted, dried and milled intosprouted flour.

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Is there a better way to celebrate the 4th of July than to highlight the bounty and variety of grain grown in the USA by baking a couple of breads that have 15 different grains in them?  Maybe some smoked ribs and a beer but this bake was close and ribs and beer will happen later :-)

 

The bread has home milled whole grains that make up 50% of the flour and include 36 g each of: wheat, rye, spelt, quinoa, oat, Kamut, Ramona Farms Pima Club & Sonoran White, Hayden Mills Farro & Desert Durum, einkorn, popcorn, millet, barkey and buckwheat.   The rest of the flout was AP.

 

The other ingredients were water for the SD levain that came in at 8% of the total flour and water, cranberry soaker water for the Pecan Cranberry oval variety and potato water for the Pumpkin and Sunflower boule.  We add some VWG because there were so many low gluten flours milled and the AP was only 10% protein.  Both loaves have some salt, red malt and ground: flax, sesame and chia seeds.

 

So, there were only 29 different ingredients total which came in under the 30 ingredient self imposed limit.  We built one 3 stage levain using the sifted out 15% extracted hard bits from the milling and refrigerated it for 24 hours after it had risen 25% in volume after the 3rd feeding.

 

The ground flax, sesame and Chia seeds were first soaked in 70 g of water for 2 hours and then added to 50 g of 85% extraction flour and 250 g of water and tang Zhonged.      The dough flour was divided in half so half could be autolysed for 2 hours with cranberry soaker water and the other half with the potato water.   Each half was autolysed with half the tang zhonged flour and seed mix.

 

Don’t let the 65% hydration fool you.  This started out as 70% whole grain bread but it was so wet due to the large tang zhong, we had to double the AP dough flour just to get it to come together and not stick to the counter after the 3rd set of slap and folds of 8, 2 and 1 minute – all 12 minutes apart.  It ended up feeling like a 50%^ whole grin bread dough at 80% hydration.

 

We then did 3 sets of stretch and folds where we incorporated the pecans and re-hydrated cranberries for one loaf and the sunflower and pumpkin seeds for the other open the first set.  The sets were 20 minutes apart.  Once done, we shaped the dough and loaded the cranberry and pecan bread into the oval basket and the sunflower and pumpkin seeds dough into the round basket.

 

With such a low amount of SD levain the dough proofed perfectly in the fridge over the 16 hours it was in the cold.  We removed the dough from the fridge and preheated Big Old Betsy to 550 F to bake the two loaves at the same time on the bottom of two stones.

 

Steam was supplied with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming pans with a dish towel rolled up inside and 1 of David’s lava rock pans.  Al were half full of water and placed onto the bottom rack of the oven under the bottom stone when the temperature hit 550 F.  15 minutes later the stones had caught up with air temperature and the Mega Steam was billowing.

 

The bread was upended onto a peel covered in parchment and slid onto the bottom stone for 15 minutes of steam.  We turned the oven down to 500 F after 2 minutes and down to 475 F after 4 minutes.  Once the steam came out, we continued to bake - at 425 F convection this time - for another 30 minutes until the bread hit 205 F on the inside.

 

The bread sprang, bloomed and browned boldly – to that mahogany color we love so much.   The Cranberry & Pecan bread browned faster and darker due to the sugar cranberry soaker water used for the dough liquid.  They came out of the oven with exceptionally crunchy crust.  So far we like what we see  but will have to wait on the crumb shots till after lunch.

 

The crust stayed  crisp after it cooled,nice for a change and it was especially tasty due to the bold bake.  Both crumbs ended up about as open as they get with this may add ins.  The cranberry was slightly mire open.  Both were soft and moist .  The cranberry bread is sweeter and nuttier and the seeded loaf tastes more earthy and seedy..... so things ended up being what we thought they should be,- different breads but dough related. 

Happy 4th of July to all Fresh Lofian’s.  The ribs were very good last night - exceptional... even of an old KCMO Smokin' Joe.

Breakfast on the 5th was special with this bread toasted.

 

 Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

RyeSD Starter

10

 

 

10

0.98%

15% Extraction 15 Grain

10

20

45

75

7.35%

Water

10

20

45

75

7.35%

Total

30

40

90

160

15.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

80

7.84%

 

 

 

Water

80

7.84%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

8.21%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

85% Extraction 15 Grain

470

46.08%

 

 

 

AP

550

53.92%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

1020

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

20

1.82%

 

 

 

Potato & Cranberry Water

650

63.73%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

63.73%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame & Chia

70

6.86%

 

 

 

VWG

15

1.47%

 

 

 

Red Malt

15

1.47%

 

 

 

Total

100

9.80%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

1100

 

 

 

 

Tot. Potato & Cranberry 325 ea & Water 80

730

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Hydration  w/ Starter

66.36%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

64.60%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,950

975

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

50.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 15 grains are:  Wheat, rye, spelt, corn, Ramona Pima Club

 

 

 

Hayden Desert Durum, Ramona Sonoran White, Hayden Farro, einkorn

 

 

oat, Kamut, millet, barley, buckwheat & quinoa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One loaf also had an additional 75 g each of pecans & dried cranberries

 

 

and loaf has 50 g each of pumpkin and sunflower seeds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The flax, sesame and chia seeds were soaked with 70 of water for 2 hours before being added to 50 g  

 

 

of 85% extraction 15 grain flourand  Tang Zhonged with 250 g of water - this liquid is not included.

 

 

 

And Lucy says not to forget the salad with the ribs  So that you can have some home made mince meat pie - with real meat in it and a puff paste top!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After last Friday’s bake found here: Götz von Berlichingen Ancient Age Sourdough Bread  our research on Götz of the Iron Fist turned up all kinds of interesting factoids.  After downloading our new Swami Swabi app for the iPhone, Lucy was able to channel many other famous Swabians and ask them what Swabien bread they enjoyed the most when they were alive - really amazing technology.

 

At 50% of the total flour and water in the dough, the levain is much darker than the dough flour.

First off, Götz isn’t the only famous Swabian out there but, not surprisingly, he liked Bavarian Missing Limb Sourdough the best.  This is a not so famous Swabian bread that is slashed very deeply, but only on one end and it is this the burnt end tat falls off while baking.   You might have heard of some of the other famous, Swabians Lucy talked to.  I know I was taken a back with her list even though it contained no women for some reason other than Lucy has no time for other women and prefers men with Von in their names.

 

Albert Einsteain, Leopold Motzart, Robert Bosch, Gottlieb Daimler, Roudoloh Diesel, Earnst Heinkel, Johanner Kepler, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Erwin Rommel and Erich Hartmann the highest-scoring ace of WWII with 352 air victories …along with three other notables – Claus Von Sauffenberg and Friedrich Gustav Jaeger - both German Army Officers tied to the assination attempt of Hiter in 1944 and Georg Elser who tried to assisnate Hiter in 1939 are just a fewof the famous men that Lucy talked to for a very long time….. I’m glad I don’t have to pay her phone bill tied to that app.

 

Lucy reports that most of them liked the usual SD Swabian breads like: Swabian Rye and Wheat Sourdough - Graubrot, or Schwabisches Weizenmischbrot which are still two of the most popular breads in Germany.  Sadly, these breads have commercial yeast kicker as a separate poolish for some reason.  I suppose the bakers just don’t trust their SD levain enough to raise the dough on its own?  We don’t have that problem here.

 

After hearing about most of these breads, Lucy was most impressed with Einstein’s interpretation of his favorite Swabian Potato Bread (Schwäbisches Kartoffelbrot) that his mother would make for him - to keep his mind sharp.  We love potatoes in bread too and anything that might help our brain is welcome.  This bread had some whole grain altus, a little rye and mostly white flour with a separate commercial yeast polish to help out the SD levain.  Lucy took one look at it and said she could come up with something a little more to our liking and way better than anything Einstein’s mother ever gave him to bite into.  She finds it amazing that Einstein could think at all eating that bread.

 

After abruptly hanging up on Einstein, Lucy started working on her formula.   She ditched the commercial yeast replacing it with a yeast water levain that was combined with the SD levain to make 1 huge Mega Combo Levain that equaled the hydration and the flour amounts of the 2 separate ones.

 

A Swabian Breakfast with somesmoked Swabian pork shoulder.

 

She used the 15% extraction from the whole wheat and whole rye milling to feed the levain and some of the 85% extracted wheat to go along with the AP flour.  She also chucked the Götz von Berlichingen altus in the levain too and used the potato boiling water for the liquid in the levain and dough.

 

This got all the hard and whole bits in the one build combo levain and it was left on the counter overnight so it could double in 9 hours.  We stirred it down and it doubled again in 3 hours and was ready to go.  We mixed everything else up with the levain and let it sit for 30 minutes before doing 3 sets of slap and folds of 8,1,1 minutes - 20 minutes apart.

 

We then did 2 sets of stretch and folds on 20 minute intervals before doing a pre-shape and final shape of the dough into a boule.  It was then placed in a rice floured basket and retarded for 12 hours.  We allowed the dough to warm up for 2 hours to get to 92.27% proof before firing up the mini oven to 500 F and getting 2 of Sylvia’s steaming cups boiling in the microwave

 

We tipped put the bread onto the top of the mini’s vented broiler pan that was covered in parchment, the steaming cups were placed catty corner and the whole assembly loaded into the Mini oven for 15 minutes of steaming.  After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 450 F.

 

Crab cake and fgrilled salmon  and  smoked rib tamale dinner.

Once the steam came out, we turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time. 15 minutes later the bread was 205 F on the inside and removed to the cooling crack.  It has bloomed a little, sprang well enough and browned that dark color showing it was boldly baked.  The crust was also very crisp.

 

Blueberry, strawberry and apricot galette makes for a afine dessert anytime.

.Once it was cool we wrapped it in plastic and let it sit on the counter overnight for 8 hours.  The crust softened as it rested.   The crumb was open soft and moist.  The crust was especially tasty and the bread was lightly sour with the yeast water muting the sour as it always does.

 

Lucy says..... don't forget to channel her salads.

This is fine tasting bread and no wonder Einstein loved his mother’s less healthy and tasty version.  Just think what he could have done with his mind if he had access to Lucy’s Schwäbisches Kartoffelbrot.  He might have been able to become telepathic, or even better, teleport himself into the future.  At least we can still talk to him any time we want with our new Swami Swabi iPhone app.

 

Formula

YW SD Starter Build

Build 1

Total

%

Rye, Spelt & WW SD Starter

8

8

4.00%

Götz von Berlichingen Altus

50

50

25.00%

85% Extraction Rye & Wheat

40

40

20.00%

15% Extraction Rye & Wheat

35

35

17.50%

AP

75

75

37.50%

Yeast Water

53

53

26.50%

Potato Water

150

150

75.00%

Total

411

411

205.50%

 

 

 

 

Combo Starter Totals

 

%

 

Flour

204

102.00%

 

Potato Water

207

103.50%

 

Starter Hydration

101.47%

 

 

Levain % of Total

53.45%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

85% Extraction Rye

50

25.00%

 

AP

150

75.00%

 

Total Dough Flour

200

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.98%

 

Potato Water

25

12.50%

 

Dough Hydration

12.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Boiled Potato

100

50.00%

 

Butter

25

12.50%

 

Total

125

62.50%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

404

Includes Altus

Total Potato Water w/ Starter

232

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

57.43%

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

75.99%

 

 

Total Weight

769

 

 

% Whole Grain

70.13%

 

 

 

Nothing like a good lunch eaten with an iron fist.

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

These sort of cinnamon rolls are similar to the one’s here:

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32275/yeast-water-cinnamon-rolls

 With some differences  The 72%  Ghirardelli Dark chocolate that replaced the original chocolate chips.  We used a 70% whole grain wheat spelt and rye flour mix and the dough weight is about 400 g grams less making there ‘mini’ rolls.

 

On the process side, we did 3 stets of slap and folds on 15 minute intervals of 5. 1 and 1 minute each, let the dough rest 15minutes and then rolled it out 1/4 “ thick and added the fillings.  Once the dough was rolled up and cut into 9 rolls, we placed them in an 8x8 pan and immediately retarded then for 4 hours to fit our next morning bake schedule..

 

Once they came out of the fridge, they were allowed to proof on the counter for 10 hours overnight before baking them at 375 F until they hit 195F on the inside middle.  After a 10 minute rest they were glazed with the GMA’s Lemon powdered sugar glaze.

 

These don’t relly taste or have the texture of puffy soft white flour cinnamon rolls. While the bread part is still soft and very moist, these are less sweet, fruitier and have the dark chocolate undertone which changes the flavor to one all its own.  We like them better than cinnamon rolls and these are healthier too.

 

Formula

Yeast Water Cinnamon Rolls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water Build

Build 1

Total

%

Yeast Water

100

100

30.77%

AP

100

100

30.77%

Total

200

200

61.54%

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water Starter Totals

 

%

 

AP Flour

100

30.77%

 

Water

100

30.77%

 

Starter Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

31.80%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Whole: Wheat, Spelt & Rye

225

69.23%

 

Total Dough Flour

225

69.23%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

1.85%

 

Water

85

26.15%

 

Dough Hydration w/o starter

37.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sugar

15

4.62%

 

Egg

56

17.23%

 

NF Dry Milk powder

12

3.69%

 

Butter

30

9.23%

 

Total

113

34.77%

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

325

 

 

Water

185

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

71.69%

 

 

Total Weight

629

 

 

% Whole Grain

69.23%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Filling

 

 

 

100 g of 72% Cocao Chocolate

 

 

3/4 C Cranberries, Raisins & Apricots Rehydrated in 2 T Bourbon

1/2 C Brown Sugar + 1 T White Sugar

 

 

1/2 T Pumpkin Pie Spice

 

 

 

1 YT Cinnamon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glaze

 

 

 

1/4 C Powdered Sugar and 1T of Lemon Juice

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy, being a German Baking Apprentice 2md Class in fairly good standing when she isn’t sleeping, came up with what she thinks is a fitting healthy and hearty bread that, if actually baked back in the 15th and 16th centuries would, all by itself, explain this one armed knight’s long life, clean behind and possibly account for his missing arm - especially if he washed it down with too many very dark, high alcohol European brewskies.  Lucy does have a thing for men with Von in their name since she is a real Von Snigglefriz herself.

 

First off, the bread had to be 100 whole grain and sourdough.  No tough, self respecting, one armed knight would be caught dead eating fluffy, white, Wonder Bread.   Second, some of the grains had to be ancient varieties that might have been found around that time, native to Germany or called dinkel which rhymes with dackel.  So Lucy picked, rye, spelt, farro, Kamut, barley and wheat.

 

Third, since the water was poisonous back then, folks drank beer to keep from having ….dirty arses!  But knights didn’t drink woosie low alcohol German lagers, they drank high alcohol dark beers with real oooopphhh to them like the one Lucy chose for the dough liquid -  a very dark Grand Imperial Porter at 8% alcohol made in Poland which itself was part of Germany at the time and several other times too.  This beer is not for the feint hearted nobility and had a very strong, assertive flavor fitting for the toughest knight.

 

Fourth, for a bread to be considered hearty and healthy, especially one that made knights seemingly live forever even with appendages and possibly appendices missing, it needs to have healthy seeds packing the inside.   Lucy picked wheat sprouts, pumpkin and  sunflower seeds, chia and  lots of flax seeds since clothes were made from flax back then too.  Nothing is too small and insignificant for Lucy not to lend a lessened understanding of it in the end.

 

The grilled salmon for the tacos earlier this week were used for today's breakfast schmear below.

With the bread concept set on parchment, the paper of the day that we now use for baking bread, we set about getting it all organized even before we knew what Karin’s challenge was going to be exactly.   We ground the whole berries on Tuesday and sifted out the 15 extraction of hard bits to feed the levain on Wednesday. 

 

The levain was our usual 3 stage build and by using the 15% hard bits for the feed  they would be as wet for as long as possible and hopefully not cut the guten stands as much as they could.   We used our Ancient Age Rye Starter that had been in the fridge for 8 weeks - it was very sour and nearly gone!.  The first stage of the levain build was 2 hours and the 2nd stage was 3 hours when it doubled in volume.  We refrigerated the  levain for 24 hours after it rose 25% after the 3rd feeding.

 

The next evening we autolysed the 85% extraction multigrain flour with the Polish Grand Imperial Porter for 1 hour with the pink Himalayan sea salt sprinkled on top so it would not be forgotten.  It took 3 hours for the levain to warm up and then double again once it was retrieved from the fridge.  Once the levain hit the mix we did 3 stets of slap and folds for 7, 1 and 1 minute each on 20 minute intervals.

 

We then did 3 sets of stretch and folds on 20 minute intervals.  The sprouts were added during the first set and the rest of the seeds were added during the 2nd set.  By the 3rd set, everything was evenly distributed and this dough was well packed with seedy goodness.  This dough was a little stiffer than our usual and could easily have taken another 5% water to get to 90% hydration - no worries. - and what we will do next time.

After a 20 minute rest, we pre-shaped and then shaped the dough into our normal squat oval fit for the mini oven, placed it in a rice floured basket, bagged it and put into the 36 F fridge for a 12 hour retard.  This bread is past the maximum weight and size we usually put into the little blistering beast so we hoped for the best and figured that if the top got too dark we would just turn it over with our remaining good arm.

 

We let the dough warm up on the counter for an hour and half but it still wasn’t proofed enough for these old eyes to be ready for the oven so we gave it another 30 minutes on the counter before firing up the Mini Oven to 500 F and getting (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups boiling in the microwave.  Total counter proof was 2 hours and 15 minutes. 

 

We upended the dough onto parchment on the top lid of the mini’s vented broiler pan and slashed it twice with an appropriate heavy battle sword which was too big for Lucy to lift.   The steaming cups went on the lid catty corner and then we slid the whole shebang into the tiny oven - it was a close fit.

 

We steamed it for 15 minutes and turned the oven down to 450 F after 2 minutes ointo the steaming process.   Then we took out the steam, turned the oven down to 425 F convection and continued to bake for another 15 minutes until the bread hit 205 F on the inside.  We did turn it over for 5minutesto make sure the top didn't burn.  We let the bread rest for 5 minutes in the now off oven to crisp the skin and then it was removed to the cooling rack.

 

The left over grilled salmon when mixed with cream cheese made for a fine schmear on this bread for today.s breakfast that was served with a ripe banana, mango, strawberries, cherries, blueberries and Denver omelet made with caramelized onion and mushrooms, some fresh red pepper, smoked Gouda and pepper jack cheese.

 

The bread sprang, bloomed and browned OK just barely well enough and developed the little blisters on the crust that the MO is so adept at making on whole grain breads.  The crumb was not as open as we wanted but it was dark,  soft and moist and attractively decorated with seeds.  The taste was exceptional and medium sour as the distinctively assertive porter taste powered through for once.  We estimate the dough was about an hour under proofed but we ran out of time.

With racks of ribs in the smoker,  potato salad and beans to make and my daighter's boyfriend coming into town to drive her to Texas and AP school later tonight - the dough got as much proofing time as life would allow.  We love the taste of this bread.  After reading about Götz von Berlichingen risking life and limb,  I'm positive that knights use to fight over less substantial things thaqn a good bread in the old days.

 

Formula

 

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD starter

8

0

0

8

2.01%

15% Extraction 6 Grains

8

16

32

56

14.07%

Water

8

16

32

56

14.07%

Total

24

32

64

120

30.15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

60

15.08%

 

 

 

Water

60

17.65%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour & Water

16.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

85% Extraction 6 Grain

338

84.92%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

2.01%

 

 

 

Porter

280

70.35%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

82.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

398

 

 

 

 

Water 60, Porter

340

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Wheat Sprouts

50

12.56%

 (dry weight)

 

Pumpkin & Sunflower Seed

50

12.56%

 

 

 

Chia Seeds

25

6.28%

 

 

 

Ground Flax Seed

25

6.28%

 

 

 

Total Add Ins

150

37.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain Equivalent %

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

896

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

85.43%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 6 whole grain mix is 50 g each of: spelt rye,

 

 

 

Kamut, farro & barley and 150 g of wheat

 

 

 

 

Lucy says not to forget the salad 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Ever since Sylvia posted her wood fired calzones we have been making them at least once a month.  These were packed with home make pizza sauce, fresh and shredded mozzarella, Parmesan and Pecorino cheeses, Italian hot sausage and pepperoni , red and green onion, button, shitaki and crimini mushrooms, with some red pepper slices and fresh basil.

The crust was starter with 100g each of AP flour and yeast water with a couple three pinches of ADY and 10 g of 6 week old rye sour starter.  We didn't have as much time as usual so we made sure the levain would be very active -quickly!  After it had risen 100% we added it to 400 g of AP 1.8% salt and enough water, 252 g, to get it to 70% hydration.

We did 6, 1 and 1  minutes of slap and fold sessions 20 minute apart and 3 sessions of  stretch and folds fromt the compass points also on 20 minute intervals.  Then we let it bulk proof on the counter for 4 hours before shaping them in to ovals with a rolling pin.  My daughter stuffed and folded them which is why they look so good and I egg washed them and slashed them 3 times each and loaded them onto parchment on a peel.

 

Here is the bottom of one piece before it was inhaled.

They were so big they barely fit on the rectangular baking stone in Big Ole Betsy who was waiting at 500 F with no steam.  We slid them off the peel onto the stone and then after 2 manures we turned the oven down to 450 F and baked them for another 8 minutes before turning them 180 degrees on the stone and turning the oven down to 425 F - convection this time.  In 15 minutes they were done, bottoms more crisp than the tops, and transferred to a cooling rack for 5 minutes before serving.  They were still too hot to eat though.  They looked fantastic and tasted great.  Just as good as a pizza.

The last of Ian's bread made a fine breakfast this morning and monsoon has arrived so....... the sunsets are better!

 

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