The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Holes at bottom of loaf

mook's picture
mook

Holes at bottom of loaf

Hi there, I am brand new to bread baking and am very much addicted already! I'm definitely improving with each loaf, but one thing that I consistently notice and have no idea why it's happening is the large bubbles towards the bottom of the loaf. My best guess is it has to do with my shaping technique, but I can't seem to figure out exactly what it is that I am doing that causes this. Any thoughts?

 

If it helps, I have been using FWSY, and this particular loaf in the picture is a harvest wheat with a poolish. 

 

Thanks in advance for your help!

WatertownNewbie's picture
WatertownNewbie

Forkish proofs his dough seam down in the banneton.  That means it will be seam up during the bake, which produces the natural openings (rather than from scoring) that he likes.  If you do this, then the bottom of your baked loaf is the top when you are shaping, which means that you might not be deflating any really big bubbles that develop during the bulk fermentation (and which can continue to grow during proofing).  Is this a possibility?

Happy baking.  Your bread looks very nice.  (By the way, if you have not already searched the TFL site for comments on FWSY timelines and amount of levain, please do so.)

Ted

mook's picture
mook

Interesting point, it definitely is possible. I do not currently do anything to deflate bubbles, but I have noticed that there is gas buildup as I shape. Sometimes they will show as a bubble as I shape, but other times it’s not visible. Do you have any suggestions on technique to deflate?

WatertownNewbie's picture
WatertownNewbie

For large bubbles (think something akin to blowing bubble gum to the diameter of a nickel) I generally flick them with my finger or use a sharp object (the end of a paring knife, for example).  The dough generally seals quickly around the hole where the bubble deflated.

David R's picture
David R

Yes, a nice sharp pointy knife does fine for large bubbles. A dull knife drags and deforms your dough, but a sharp one leaves no mess.