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gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

We 3 gmas baked TFL's Pan Aux Raisins and Cream Cheese Snails

This week the middle gramma (me) chose the recipe, and I chose a recipe from TFL's selection of great ones. Pan Aux Raisins and Cream Cheese Snails.  We had a good time making these and the funniest thing was the one I cut open this morning that introduces our bake... there are about 5 raisins on top of the roll I cut, so there was not way of knowing that the inside was going to turn out like this! Loved it!

Here are our pictures. Barb's first and she is the multitasker this week... she made the pink lemonade cake from King Arthur's baking catalogue.  

isn't this a beautiful cake.... didn't see a cut piece... must be for when the kids come over. 

                                                                         And then a roll, that popped out to look like a little piggy jumped onto the cake.. She corraled them and arranged them on this plate and they behaved after that.!

These are mine... I only made raisin rolls.   

These are really tasty little gems.    You all know Helen is famous for her braiding... well, her spirals are something to behold also... These cream cheese snails, look so professional. 

                                                                     Another

Amazing day with my sisters and many good things to share as a result... Life is good.... Looking forward to many more bakes with my role models!

We all enjoyed this recipe and the results. I, personally, am blown away by that rolls I sliced this morning... I laughed so hard, it was a great good morning... I felt like my sisters were right there with me... that smile looks like both of them!!! Really, it does. 

Happy Baking, Barb, Helen and Diane

 

Odrade's picture
Odrade

Blueberry and White Chocolate Sourdough

Long bulk fermentation and long final proofing using manitoba flour all done in refrigirator. Carefully added blueberries and white chocolate before final proofing in bannetons. 

tlau's picture
tlau

Help with Argentine flour: wet doughs

I've gotten a lot of useful advice from TFL over the past years but finally after a year and a half of breadmaking failure I am reaching out for help.

I've been a bread baker for about three years. For the past year and a half I have been living in Buenos Aires, Argentina and have been trying to recreate the breads I loved in the US using locally sourced ingredients and
equipment, mostly with disastrous results. I'm reaching out now for help to see if anyone with more experience can help me interpret what's happening to my breads.

The short version of the story is that the doughs I produce end up too wet and with no structure, compared to similarly hydrated doughs I produced in the US. After some research, I believe this is because Argentine bread 
flour has a lower percentage of protein/gluten than either AP or bread flour in the US. I documented this in detail on my blog: http://tlau.org/food/2013/05/argentine-bread-flours/

To compensate for that, I have been trying to supplement the flour with more gluten. I can obtain something called harina glutinada which claims to have 42% protein according to the label. So I have been mixing this with the standard bread flour to obtain what I believe should be flour with around 14% protein.  (From this link it looks like US bread flour has 12-14% protein.) I also imported some Bob's Red Mill vital wheat gluten during my last visit to the States (75% protein) and have experimented with adding that to the flour as well.

My first experiments seemed promising. My basic recipe is Emily Buehler's "basic bread" from her Bread Science book. It's a 70% hydration dough, optionally made with a poolish, that I am forming into two baguettes using a French bread pan. Experiments with increased gluten levels yielded decent-looking baguettes: http://tlau.org/food/2013/05/a-tale-of-two-breads/

More often, however, I struggle with doughs that are too wet and gloppy, coming out more soupy than firm. For one example, I tried making Bittman's original No-Knead Bread recipe using a mixture of bread flour and harina glutinada to end up with a supposedly 12% protein flour mix (435g of 10% protein flour, 45g of 42% protein flour -- can someone check my math?). After the first 14-hour rise, the dough poured out of the bowl, more soup than dough:

 

It's the same result as if I hadn't increased the gluten at all -- I had been seeing similar results trying to use unmodified flour.

More recently, I made my first dough using a sourdough starter that I began a week ago. The final dough had 64% hydration, plus a 21% proportion of starter (which has been maintained at a 1:3:2 starter:flour:water ratio, according to Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day starter formula).  I made a 16% gluten flour mix (471g 10% flour, 109g of 42% harina glutinada). With this low hydration, I would expect the dough to be rather dry, and in fact right after I mixed all the ingredients together, the dough was indeed very dry -- when I started kneading, not all the flour had been incorporated into the dough. After kneading, the dough felt tacky but not sticky; my fingers would stick to the dough but peel away clean. The windowpane test showed that the gluten had developed.

Yet after an overnight rise, the dough had turned back into soup:

It's behaving like an extremely wet dough, sticking to my fingers and to the counter, not at all how I'd expect a 64% hydration dough to behave based on what I've read online and seen on YouTube.

These experiments are very consistent with what I've been experiencing in the past year and a half (without a starter, just using commercial yeast) using locally sourced ingredients. I have read that higher protein levels enable the flour to absorb more water, which is why I have been trying to increase the protein level using glutinated flour. Yet it still does not seem to be enough. Does anyone have any other possible explanations for why my doughs are turning out so wet?

Yes, I know that I can reduce the amount of water, but I am (of course) still striving for those big holes characteristic of artisan bread, and decreasing the water seems to be at odds with trying to get the big airy breads.

Help?

beakernz's picture
beakernz

Any scientific evidence to support "no metal utensils or bowls" for sourdough?

I have seen a lot of this chatter but rarely anything to back it up.  "never stir your starter with ssteel or metal utensils", "never rise your dough in a ss bowl" etc.  Where does this come from?  Personally I have tried ss utensils and bowls and non-ss utensils and bowls and have noticed zero difference.  Even tried some blind taste tests and no one could tell a difference.  Is this an old myth or is there concrete evidence to support it?

evonlim's picture
evonlim

German sour adapted from halfpenny

German sour adapted from  halfpenny http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33528/hippie-bread-german-accent

(please follow instruction from above site)

i converted the cups to grams... and used fruits YW

Soaker (Poolish)
122.5g whole wheat flour
11.15g wheat bran
18.3g wheat germ
45g buckwheat flour
48g cracked wheat
1-2 tsp salt
1 cup liquid sourdough starter 100% hydration
¼ cup yeast water ( Banana)
2/3 cup warm water

 

Sponge (Scrap Dough)
330g white unbleached flour
½ cup steel cut oats
1/3 cup rolled oats
1-2 tsp salt
1 cup liquid sourdough starter
½ cup yeast water (raisin)

 

Final Dough
Make more yeast water (see above)
330g  white unbleached flour
½ cup molasses
½ cup honey
2 tsp celery seed
3 tsp poppy seed
1/4 cup flax seed (toasted n corse grind)
All sponge dough (pinch this off in 1 inch chunks as you add it)
All soaker dough
1 cup liquid sourdough starter. 100 hydration

1/2 cup of the Yeast Water (Riasin) added more YW 

 i made 4 medium small loaves

good taste of sour and lovely hint of celery seeds.. great texture. fruit YW made it soft .. eventhough it looks densed

had it with eggs and bacon and lots of greens.. 

yummy. 

thank you halfpenny it is a keeper :)

it is a good change from dried fruits version to wheats and oats

evon

greedybread's picture
greedybread

Winter Warmer.....Toady!!

Toad in the hole!!

Delish…so yummy and wonderful for winter.

Perfect for the cold!!

Perfect for the cold!!

Veggies too

Veggies & gravy too

Peeking out!!

Peeking out!!

Ok, not truly a yeasty but a battery type bready/dumpling concoction…

Plus I am not really a savoury girl so you know for me to post it, it has to be good!!

Bonus is that its easy, quick, and you could do a variety of things with this recipe actually..

I used Lady Gouda’s recipe as a guide and tweaked it accordingly…

The dry's

The dry’s

Bit of this!

Bit of this!

Eggy mix

Eggy mix

batter ready to rest...

batter ready to rest…

You can of course add onions, etc one of my greedyboys would not have a bar of onions….

so no onions…

But caramelised onions with rosemary in a gravy actually baked in the batter would be scrummy!!

Mmmm nom nom nom..:)

And and and if you don’t use gourmet sausages, a cheap wee tasty meal:)

Browning...

Browning…

Some batter on...

Some batter on…

Covered

Covered

Bit of me old mate, parmy!!

Bit of me old mate, parmy!!

So what do you need ?????

For 6 people

12 sausages, decent quality would be fab but mr cheepy is ok too….

3 cups of flour

2 tsp baking powder

big pinch salt

1 tbsp mustard powder

good dash of ground pepper

4 eggs

2 cups of milk

wee bit oil oil to start

1/2 cup of grated parmesan.

butter for greasing.

For the GRAVY:

Dash of soy sauce

Enough flour to make a roux

salt and pepper

beef stock 2 cups

Fresh rosemary.

Mmmmm Goldy

Mmmmm Goldy

Love bangers!

Love bangers!

I cooked this recipe in the roasting dish and I would recommend the same BUT any dish is ok.

Heat saucepan/frypan, add in oil and then add in sausages and cook until 3/4 done and brown.

While cooking add all dry ingredients into a bowl and combine well.

Mix eggs and milk together and whisk well.

Tasty

Tasty

Battery...Mmmm

Battery…Mmmm

Remove sausages from frypan but keep the fat from bangers in the fry pan, you will use it for gravy roux starter.

Grease roasting dish and place sausages in the dish.

Add milky egg mix into dry ingredients and beat until smooth.

Cover lightly and allow batter to rest for 30-60 minutes.

A large slice?

A large slice?

Pre heat oven to 220 celsius and pop roasting dish in the oven when temperature is reached, removing sausages first though:)

After 5 minutes, place sausages into the roasting dish again and pour batter over them, covering them totally.

Sprinkle with 1/2 cup of grated parmesan.

Bake in the hot oven for 20-25 minutes and remove when golden brown and puffy.

Lots of sauasges

Lots of sauasges

Whilst baking, heat the sausage fat in the frypan and add in enough flour to make a dry paste.

Cook out the roux and brown it a little.

Remove from the heat and add in 1/2 cup of beef stock .

Whisk till smooth and add in s & p and a dash of soy sauce.

Add 1 cup of stock and whisk until smooth, return to the heat and allow to come to slow boil, whisking away.

Where's my sausage??

Where’s my sausage??

Add in last stock amount and whisk in and turn down heat a little and bring to slow simmer.

Season more if needed, slow simmer until Toady batter is cooked.

Slice toad in the hole, pour on that gravy, have some veg or salad and you are away laughing!!

ENJOY!

Cause I did….

Almost need a grappa afterwards as a digestive as I ate toooooo much!!

Lovely.....

Lovely…..

http://greedybread.wordpress.com/2013/05/17/winter-warmer-toad-in-the-hole/#more-3382

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Farmer's Market Season Baking

I've put myself to the test.  I plan to summon 10 loaves of my own at home, freshly baked, every Saturday Morning, to bring to my local farmer's market as trade. This is week one for me.  As some already know I am a full time professional baker and believe it or not the last thing I want to do on the weekend  is bake. Actually as I've aged I prefer to cook opposed to bake on my free time.  I used to bake at home endlessly but with a full time job doing such that teetered off.  I'm back.  I see all of the wonderful stuff created from home on this site, much of which blows away professionally made product.  I want in.  I'm gonna be a part-time home baker.  I bet I'll need some advice from those of you with more skills baking bread in rinky dink home ovens with pots and pans and the such.  I've done it and done it well but I'm only a novice.  Most of my breadwork is with commerical tools, and in some cases top notch.  

Also my plan is to be spontaneous and just kinda wing a new loaf every week.  This week I've made up what I'll call the "Super Grain Sour Wheat"  I did some reading on super grains this week and thought well those should be a soaker for a loaf of bread.  So I made a levain of Central Milling High Mountain High Protein, Central Mill freshly ground whole wheat, Central Milling freshly ground whole rye, starter, and h20.  This was built off of a 100% cold living white starter and essentially a second build 8 hours after it was previously fed 1:2::2. 

Soaker:

3 oz toasted millet 3 oz, toasted buckwheat (kashi), 3 oz toasted kamut, 3 oz toasted quinoa

Levain

3 oz Rye

7 oz Wheat

10 oz HP

20 oz H20

10 oz White Starter 100%

--------------------------------------------------------------

Rise 8 hours.  

 

Final Dough

85 oz HP

20 oz Wheat

70 oz H20

3 oz  Sea Salt

4 oz  H20 #2

----------------------------------------------------------------

Autolyse 2 hours 

Add levain, salt, soaker and mix on speed one (uh oh super wet) 5 minutes

Turn to speed 2 (medium)  5 minutes (looking better)

Turn to speed 3 hi about 5 minutes (phew it came together)

Bulk Ferment plan: 3 1/2 hours (3-4 s+f) at 20 minutes intervals but I'll let the dough lead

Shape/ partially proof (2-3 hours) Retard overnight

Wake up early set up my oven and bake in 3-4 waves.   cool down. make sure its not terrible and then head to market

I'll add some pics of dough and the such as I go.  

I'm mostly sharing this to motivate me to do this and to document some of my findings.  Hey I bet I'll make a few good loaves before the markets over in November.  

 

Happy Baking

Josh

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

YW & Poolish Hot Dog Buns

With Memorial Day neigh, we needed some hot dog buns for some sausages and brats we will start the weekend off with tonight for dinner.   Who better to come up with a recipe for them than none other than our resident Hot Dog and my German baking Apprentice - Lucy!

 

She got in the mood doing slap and folds for the Japanese Black Rice bread earlier today while singing her favorite Japanese cowboy song -  ‘Yippee Oh Kiyae, I am a Japanese Hot Dog, Bun Making Sandman.’  Yes, it is even truer that she got into this song more doggedly while doing the slap and folds for these buns.  She is incorrigible.

 

 In any event, we made a poolish and YW levain over 12 hours.   After a short 1 hour autolyse, we mixed it all together, did the singing, slapping and folding over 10 minutes and then let the dough rest for 15 minutes before doing the first of 3 sets of S& F’s in the bowl.

 

After a 30 minute rest we shaped the dough into 5 tight little logs a spiral bun and a Franz Joseph roll just in case a hamburger happened onto the gill with the Hot Dogs over the weekend.   After proofing for an hour and a half on parchment paper laid out over a plastic cutting board substituting for a peel, we thought they looked fairly proofed.

 

The oven was already hot from the Japanese Black Rice bread so all we had to do was reconstitute the lava rock and CI skillet steam and get to baking.  The rolls, after egg washing, went in at 400 F for 2 minutes and then 6 minutes at 375 F before removing the steam.  We then turned the oven down to 350 F convection this time and baked the rolls for an additional 12 minutes while rotating them on the stone every 5 minutes,

 

After a total of 20 minutes, the rolls looked nice and brown so out they came to a cooling rack.  We brushed some milk on them to make sure that they crust would be soft as possible.   They puffed up beautifully in the oven and the Toadies really come through in the smell department.  Lucy can’t wait to eat these buns with a nice variety of sausages for dinner.  Will post a crumb shot then.

 

The nuns were very good and they worked out well even if a little on the large side - just more room for pickled, onions, cucumber and Hatch chilis.

Happy Memorial Weekend!

Love the left over toasted buns much better when steamed for lunch the next day!

Formula

YW & Poolish

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Yeast Water

85

0

0

85

17.00%

Pinch of yeast

0

0

0

0

0.00%

AP

130

50

50

230

46.00%

Water

50

50

0

100

20.00%

Total

265

100

50

415

83.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

YW & Poolish

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

230

46.00%

 

 

 

Water

185

37.00%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.43%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

0

42.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

270

54.00%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

270

54.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.80%

 

 

 

Water

81

16.20%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

30.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

266

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

53.20%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

2.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

65.57%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

982

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Egg

47

9.40%

 

 

 

Butter

42

8.40%

 

 

 

Non Fat Dry Milk Powder

25

5.00%

 

 

 

Cream Cheese

50

10.00%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

2.00%

 

 

 

Honey

20

4.00%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.00%

 

 

 

Total

207

41.40%

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain SD with Japanese Black Rice, Seeds, Prunes & Dried Edamame

After Evon’s post of her bread with Japanese Black Rice in it, we knew it had to get to the top pf the bake list like Hanseata’s Wild Rice bread did when it appeared.  We had run across some of this rice a couple of months ago at Sprouts and had cooked it for dinner.  We knew it would end up in bread eventually and Evon’s post was the impetus.

 

The question was what kind of bread to put it in?  My apprentice went back and looked at our take of the Karin’s wonderful Wild Rice Bread and quickly knew that we would do something similar to it, perhaps not as dark or complicated.

 

Since I started medicating my apprentice with Sylvia’s Dog Bones, she isn’t as determined or anal as usual - even though she has taken to licking the glow in the dark, black light intensified picture we have of Elvis performing in Las Vagas.   Here was that bake:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/28806/hanseata%E2%80%99s-wild-rice-sd-w-yeast-water-multi-seeds-prunes-beer-and-sprouts

Here is Karin’s original post :

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24092/wild-rice-sourdough-bread-ended-cold-war

Here is Evon’s inspirational bake, if a little dark, : Sprouted Organic Wild Black Rice SD Bread

 

It isn’t often we have a new bread ingredient like Japanese Wild Rice but Evon’s bread also had edamame in it – a second ingredient we have never seen used in bread before.  And as luck would have it, we had 3 kinds of edamame in the pantry and freezer.  We had fresh shelled edamame in the freezer. Wasabi dried edamame (my favorite after a few beers) and regular dried edamame.

 

You can tell we eat it a lot around here since it is my daughter’s favorite veggie.  We decided to be our normal conservative self when it comes to baking, as opposed to my apprentice’s solution for cleaning tile grout or magnesium rims on fine, if old, motorcycles.  So, we went with the non Wasabi dried edamame even though the black rice is Japanese.  You just can’t make apprentice’s think after leading them to water.

 

We sprouted the black rice and thought we had killed it when we forgot it was soaking and let it go for 8 hours before draining and putting them between damp paper towels.   But the rice loved it and after 2 days had sprouted well.  My apprentice was especially thrilled since this was her first time sprouting any kind of rice.

 

We did the standard (3) 4 hour levain build by putting all of the whole multi-grains in the levain.  Since it was white flour in the dough, we autolysed it for 1 hour only with the VWG, Toadies, red and white malts.  Once the levain and autolyse came together we did 10 minutes of slap and folds.

My apprentice sang one of her favorite tunes while doing the S& F’s - an Oriental cowboy song called - ‘Yippee Oh Kiyae, I am a Japanese Hot Dog, Bun Making Sandman.’  I reminded her that we wouldn’t be making hot dog buns till later in the day but she was in the groove and just wouldn’t be stopped with her being a hot dog and Japanese rice in the mix.  I’m guessing it won’t be the last time I hear this odd tune today.

 

After a 15 minute rest we did 3 sets of S& F’s on 15 minute intervals and added the edamame, black rice sprouts, ground non aromatic and aromatic seed variety and prunes on the first set.  By the 3rd set they were well distributed.  After another 15 minute rest, we divided the dough in half, shaped each and placed them into rice floured baskets and then into used plastic trash can liners.

 

After a 30 minute rest on the counter the baskets were placed into the fridge for an 18 hour retard.  By the next morning they had risen well in the fridge.  They came out of the cold for one hours to warm up before we fired up Big Old Betsy with Sylvia’s and David’s Patented Steaming Combo.

 

It took 45 minutes for the oven to get to 500 F including the 20 minutes for the top and bottom stones to get to that temperature lagging 20 minute behind.  We really cut back on the rice flour this time and worried that the dough would stick to the baskets but they came out no worries after a rap on the parchment covered peel.  A quick slash and into the oven they went.

 

After 2 minutes of steam at 500 F we turned the oven down to 465 F for a further 10 minutes of steam.  After removing the steam, we turned the oven down to 450 F, convection this time and let the bread finish baking to 205 F on the inside while rotating the bread ever 5 minute on the stone.  Total baking time was 27 minutes with 15 of it without steam.

 

It browned up, bloomed out had a few blisters and an ear where we tried to get one.  I like the color of this bread and the pattern that the baskets put on them.  They smell like they will be tasty if not delicious.  Have to wait for the crumb shot till after lunch .

The crumb is soft, light, open and moist.  The taste is totally unique and unlike Hanseata's Wild Rice bread.   We really like this bread.  the dried edamame will be a routine bread ingrediant from now on - we love the mouth feel and taste of them in thsi bread very much.   We love rhe contrasting ncolors and textures of teh crumb - very appealing!  It is another fine bread of late and a shout out goes to Evon for her inspiration and fine post of her bread.  One more crumb picture for Lucy!

Formula

Whole Wheat and Rye Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW and Rye Sour Starter

20

0

0

20

3.17%

Whole Wheat

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Spelt

0

15

15

30

4.76%

Rye

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Water

30

45

20

95

15.08%

Total

80

90

65

235

37.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

130

20.63%

 

 

 

Water

105

16.67%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.79%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

500

79.37%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

79.37%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.75%

 

 

 

Water

382

60.63%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

630.0

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

487

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.30%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

25.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.90%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Toadies

20

3.17%

 

 

 

Prunes

72

11.43%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

Dried Edamame

35

5.56%

 

 

 

Ground Sesame & Flax Seeds

12

1.90%

 

 

 

Poppy Seeds

3

0.48%

 

 

 

Anise, Coriander, Caraway & Fennel

12

1.90%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Total

172

27.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Japanese Back Rice

100

15.87%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

100

15.87%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight for Japanese Black Rice is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

My Current Projects: Gluten Free / Bread for a "Treasure Island" fair

At the moment I am pursuing two totally different themes in my baking: Gluten Free bread and bread for a school summer fair themed "Treasure Island".

This blog post is intended as a journal for my thoughts and ideas, nothing is final yet.

The photo above is my take on "Pease Bread", the 18th century wheat-free alternative. See below.

Let's start with Gluten Free (GF) bread:

After my initial success with a Buckwheat-Millet Sourdough I am aiming to understand more indepth how GF flours behave. I will be using Psyllium husks as a gelling agent, avoiding all processed ingredients like gums etc.

My plan is:

  1. To determine the optimum amount of Psyllium needed for several GF flours. I will use a 60:40 flour:starch mix and instant yeast for these experiments. I will aim to adjust hydration in a way that makes the doughs feel similar. 
  2. To determine the fermentability of the individual flours Plus Psyllium  using Raisin Yeast Water, Rye Sourdough and Yeast.
  3. To develop a reliable GF Starter
  4. To work on flour combinations and taste

This is a lot of work, but i am really excited to do this.

My spreadsheet (work in progress) is here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkcYHhPxccKtdG5aRV96RVY3TUkzdWM1R0tWcndmaXc&usp=sharing

/*  UPDATE */

Posted some photos of step 1 above: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33651/some-gf-experiments

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Having spoken to several people with food allergies it is clear to me that it might be necessary to design a bread for an individual person and their specific sensitivities. 

A big Thank You to Gluten Free Gourmand and Laura T. for your inspirations:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32708/glutenfree-sourdough-progress

"Treasure Island" baking:

My son kindly volunteered me to have a bread stall at their school's summer fair. 

This fair is meant to be organised by the children, and the theme is "Treasure Island". 

It took me a few days to figure out what I could do within this frame of reference, and the pieces are starting to come together.

I looked into 18th century baking, and Andy (ananda) generously pointed me to an article about the history of flour usage in Britain.

I will have a group of children do most of the work on the day before the fair, using the school kitchen.

And this is what I intend to bake with them:

  1. Ships Biskets (Hardtack): the staple food of the sailors; this will be more for curiosity. Wholegrain Wheat flour 100%, Water 50%, Salt 2%, Mix until evenly hydrated, rest for 1 hour or so, shape flat palm-size biscuits 4oz each, dock, bake until completely dry, but not brown (I have to figure that one out). 4 of these was a sailor's daily ration.
  2. Pease Bread (see the picture at the top): The staple food of the very poor, or in times of bad wheat harvests.This is my take, quite tasty: Ground Haricot Beans: 30%, Ground Pearl Barley: 30%, Oatmeal 30%, Water 80%, Salt 2%, Rye Sour (100% HL) 20%. DT 28C. Bulk fermentation 2 hours, proof in basket 1 hour, long bake in falling oven.
  3. Maslin Bread: This would have been the staple bread of the lower classes in south England. My take on this: Wholegrain Rye: 50%, High Extraction Wheat: 50%, Water 75%, Salt 2% Rye Sour 20%. DT 28C. Bulk fermentation 2 hours, proof in basket 1 hour. Bake in falling oven starting hot.
  4. Manchet Bread: This is what the Squire, Doctor and Captain would have eaten. There are several historical recipes about, this is my first take. Everybody loved it: Stoneground White Strong flour: 100%, Water 54%, Salt 2%, Instant Yeast 0.7%. Mix, knead and beat the living daylights out of it with a rolling pin, until very silky. Get those carotenoids oxidized. They want WHITE bread!  Proof 2 hours. Shape into batard. Proof 40 minutes. Bake at 210C.

I will try out some other recipes for Manchet, and I intend to use ale barm - this afternoon I will pick up some from the brewery.

Here is a picture of Manchet and Maslin breads:

And here is a crumb shot of Maslin, Manchet and Pease Breads:

I am off to my kitchen now...

Cheers,

Juergen

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