The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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DonD's picture
DonD

Loaves for my Father

I have not done much baking in the last month and a half since my Father suffered a stroke. After a brief stay in the hospital, he was moved to a rehabilitation center for speech, occupational and physical therapy. Subsequently, our days were busy with work, shuttling my mother back and forth from her apartment to the rehab center where she would spend all day with him and preparing dinner for her in the evening since she was too tired to even think about herself. Unfortunately, because the stroke had affected his speech and ability to swallow food, he was progressively getting weaker and complications set in until he was moved back to the hospital where the doctors told us that basically they could not do anything else for him. We moved him to a Hospice Center in the Washington area a week from this past Tuesday, a beautiful and peaceful place.


Since all my siblings and their families were in town to visit my Father and to comfort my Mother, this past Saturday morning, I made two batches of dough for a family dinner. One was a white flour Baguette dough with liquid levain and the other was a high extraction Pain de Campagne dough with liquid levain, both intended for overnight cold retardation and baking on Sunday. The doughs had just gone through partial bulk fermentation and were put in the refrigerator in the early afternoon. We headed to the Hospice Center to spend the afternoon with my Father but upon arrival, learned that he had just slipped away peacefully. He was 91 years-old.


The next 3 days were a blurr with so many things to attend to. The funeral and cremation occurred on Tuesday July 20. It was preceded by a heart-warming Buddhist Ceremony and gathering of many Relatives and Friends.


Yesterday, we finally had a day to wind down when I realized that the doughs after three and a half days were still sitting in the refrigerator waiting to be baked. They had tripled in size and the high extraction dough had rendered some liquid. Since we had planned a Family Dinner yesterday evening, I decided to go ahead and bake them anyway and share them with my Family in memory of my Father.


The doughs had become very extensible to the point of becoming limp. As my head was still preoccupied with so many thoughts, by mistake, I baked the high extraction dough as Baguettes and the white dough as a Batard.


The Baguettes did not have the usual oven spring but the taste was surprisingly sweet and nutty. The crumb was a little bit denser but not overly tangy in spite of the extensive retardation. The Batard had much better oven spring and the crumb was open, slightly chewy and again not overly sour. We enjoyed them with a perfectly ripe Camembert and toasted to the memory of my Dear Father and Mentor, the man who taught me so much about the enjoyment of good food and wines.



Goodbye Dad...


Don


 

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Almond Ricotta Biscotti


It is natural to consider that Ricotta and almonds would be married together into a delicious soft biscotti flavored with almond oil. Almond ricotta biscotti are delicate cookies but with an intense aroma. We always include it on a “Torta di Biscotto di Nozze” because they are so perfect for a biscotti wedding cake.  It is the almond oil that gives these cookies that lovely warm almond flavor.


http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2010/07/21/almond-ricotta-biscotti/





willchernoff's picture
willchernoff

Making that French Loaf

I've spent the last couple weeks working on a french style loaf.  I think my recipe and technique are getting better, so I figured I'd post my efforts for others to review.


 


Steps available: http://wchernoff.wordpress.com/2010/07/07/feel-that-oven-spring/


 


Notes:


1.  I've used this recipe with 17 oz of flour and 11 oz of water (a change from 62% to 65% water) which seemed to make a lighter/holier loaf (sorry but not pics).  Has anyone noticed this effect?  Also this change results in a softer dough, so I had to be quick about slashing the tops. 


 


Questions:


2.  How can one prevent the razor from sticking to the dough when slashed?


3.  My oven doesn't conduct heat correctly when adding water for steam.  How does a spray bottle compare to a cup of water for producing steam?

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Dry weight / Liquid weight in a recipe

I have a question. I have been making SD starter for some time and it was always ???? ok.


My last 4-5 attemts have gone in the garbage.


The basic formula I have is 1/4 cup of water  3/8 cup of flour. Thats what I have used in the past in cup measurement only.


Now if the recipe calls for  water  4 oz.  Flour 3/8  cup.  Water NP 3 oz.  3/8 cup of flour at 8 oz per cup seems like wrong formula if I am supposed to use dry measurment at 4.5 oz per cup.


If I was to use the 4.5 oz per cup for flour and it calls for 3/8 cup should that not be about 1.69 oz dry weight instead of 3 oz liquid?


Seems like that would be a very wet mixture at 1.68 oz flour and 3 oz. water.


So what weight is supposed to be used in most recipes? Thats my big question.


Liquid for liquid and dry weight for flour. I have a print out of all the various measurements and most flour I use is about 4.5 oz dry or Should I always do the math on the package per comapany specs per dry cup.


  Big difference in volume for flour weight liquid versas dry per cup of flour.


Have I Just been lucky that my starter has doubled each time I discarded and then added 1/4 cW+3/8c flour at 8 0z per cup. .Still very stiff starter and so hard to work with.


 Hope this was not to confusing. I seem to be brain dead lately.  


Thanks


 Mr.Bob


 


 

Neo-Homesteading's picture
Neo-Homesteading

Bailey's Irish Chip Scones


 


So I tossed back and forth as to if scones are actually bread or not, I know TFL does do general baking posts but for me I'm trying to keep my posting to primarily my bread obsessions and adventures. For this breakfast I decided to make a scone probably my first "more traditional" style scone, in the past I've mostly made biscuits and called them scones. I made these with irish cream and chocolate chips and they were so amazing. I served them with a home made lemon curd and could not be more surprised how well they actually went with one another. I'm hoping to do another scone sometime soon but lately with the high temperatures I'm keeping my baking limited to nights and very early mornings. I have made these and frozen them, baked them directly from the freezer but it does extend the baking time which seems to defeat the purpose. I almost wonder if I do something without chocolate could I just do them like farls or skillet scones?. 


 


External Link to blog post and recipe: http://neo-homesteading.blogspot.com/2010/05/baileys-chocolate-chip-scones.html


 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Pictures from Paris, part 2

Actually a few of these are from Montpellier too, like the first few:









Macarons are all the rage.



This bakery had the dark baguettes set aside for people like me who like them that way.




Breakfast.


hanseata's picture
hanseata

German Many Seed Bread

Today's baking was my (less sweetened) version of the German Many Seed Bread from "Whole Grain Baking". Instead of a soaker and a biga I used just the soaker with stretch & fold technique for the first time, adding some more water. The breads turned out really nice, I think it's an improvement.



Sorry, no crumb shot - these breads were for sale.

jasonm2674's picture
jasonm2674

Philly style hoagie roll recipe needed badly!! :)

Hi Everyone,


 


I can't say enough how much I enjoy and learn from everyone's posts on the fresh loaf.   I have been searching for a long while now for a simple Philly style hoagie roll recipe.  Trying to use search engines leads to a vast amount of copied recipes from generic posts.  Can anyone help with the technique, ingredients, secrets, or creating the cheesesteak style roll ?   I've heard Amoroso's and Sracone's are the two major "authentic" philly style rolls. 


 


Thank you all for any information that you may be able to give.


 


J

Katan-Melekh's picture
Katan-Melekh

Different Milks in Bread?

Hi, I know I read you can use 2%, Vitamin D, or even whole milk in bread making, but what if you used half & half or like a heavy whipping cream.  Does anyone know how that would effect the bread?


Thanks!

Guyandhisbread's picture
Guyandhisbread

Tea Bread?

Hello i have tried to make a tea bread lately and i tried to cook it like my normal sourdough, but apparently it is very different and more rich thenn normal so it bakes differently. if anyone else has tried this plz tell me the temp and time. and if u have any other unique ingredients tell me :)

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