The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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QARunner's picture
QARunner

First try at Peter Reinhart's Transitional Multigrain loaf....

 Last night I tried Peter Reinhart's Transitional Multigrain  Hearth Bread. The bread looked and tasted great. However, the crumb was a bit tighter than I was expecting. Is this usual for a multigrain bread? I know my whole wheat breads tend to tighten as ratio of bread to wheat flour decreases.


The multigrain dough includes rolled oats, whole wheat flour, rye flour, cornmeal, wheat germ, flaxseeds and bread flour...22% wholewheat, 44.5% bread flour and 33.5% multigrain mix with 61% water.


Can I make the crumb airier by increasing hydration or possibly adding vital wheat glutin? Or is this typical crumb for a multigrain bread?


 


 


 


 


tametcalf's picture
tametcalf

Any modifications needed for baking on a stone vs pan?

Hi,


 


I'm new here and also new to making breads (other than using breadmachine). A couple weeks ago I started making simple Boule that I found in "5 minutes a day for fresh bread". 


 


I was going to try a different recipe I found in a bread book. The recipe says to put it in a bread loaf pan. Is there any modification to the recipe if I want to make more of a round artisan sytle of bread?


 


Thanks and I'll keep reading the forums & lessons.


-T

darren1126's picture
darren1126

Density

I'm new to baking bread and have a question about density. I have baked the bread from the recipe provided in lesson 2. This has turned our great several times, but, I'm wondering what the trick is to making it less dense. I'm looking for a good bread to use for Sub's.


 


Thanks,


Darren

Jahosacat's picture
Jahosacat

Gluten and sourdough breads

I'm making my first sourdough loaf this morning. While I was looking thru my recipes, I noticed many of them called for bread flour. I can't find bread flour around here that has a protein content any higher than my AP flour. I like to bake with whole wheat flour, so, between that and the AP flour, when I've made breads prior to this in my bread machine I've added gluten. I'd be interested in reading comments about glutens use in sourdough bread. I didn't add any to the loaf I have rising now, but, I'm curious if experienced bakers think adding it will make a difference.

cfmuirhead's picture
cfmuirhead

Technical Help on producting a blog - how to save/edit

I am a blog virgin!  Trying desperately to create my first blog.  I can now insert pictures and texts BUT can anyone tell me how to edit and save a text which I intend to work more on before publishing it.  It seems that either I have to log out of TFL and lose what I have created thus far or if I do 'save', doesn't that publish the document automaticlly, hence I am sending for all to read a document only half (if that!) done.  HELP!

Yippee's picture
Yippee

20100217 Chinese New Year Celebrations

This year is the Year of Tiger.  It’s a tradition for Cantonese to make cakes for the Chinese New Year.  The pronunciation of cakes, which is ‘GO’, is the same as the word ‘tall’ in Cantonese.  Seniors in the family like to wish their grandchildren grow tall and healthy (快高長大) in the New Year.  Therefore, cakes are an indispensable part of the Chinese New Year celebrations. 


 


We make all sorts of cakes, sweet and savory, from rice or glutinous rice flours.  My favorite is radish (daikon) cakes.   You’ll find them where dim sum is served in a Chinese restaurant or they are sold pre-packaged in a Chinese grocery store when it’s close to the Chinese New Year.  But let me tell you, these are no comparison to the homemade ones. For the ones money can buy, they are usually made with a very high proportion of flour and very little radish and other ingredients.  Therefore, these cakes often turn out very hard and have very little flavor. 


 


Before the New Year, I usually prepare a very fancy version of daikon cake which consists of Japanese dried scallops(瑤柱), dried shrimps(蝦米), Virgina ham (金華火腿), Chinese style cured and smoked ham(臘肉), Cantonese style sausage(臘腸), plenty of shredded daikon and a small amount of rice flour. The mixture of all ingredients is steamed for about 45 minutes and let cool on wire rack.  During the New Year, we normally lightly pan fry the cake before enjoying it. It is crispy outside with flavorful seafood and meats.  Instead of the usual gumminess you’ll experience from store-bought daikon cakes, the mouthfeel of the inside of this cake is moist and soft, with the fibrous chunks of shredded daikon coming apart.  With all the ingredients, it’s a big, tasty meal in itself and I like to dip it with Lee Kum Kee (李錦記) chili sauce before serving.


 

I must give credit to my husband for his efforts to assist me in the preparation of radish cakes this year.   He took on the role of dicing and weighing ingredients and shredding the radish, which are the most time consuming parts of the process.  He wanted to do this with me so that we can spend more precious time together.  I truly appreciate his thoughts and prepare many good foods in return. The radish cake served today was pan fried and pictured by my husband as well.    

 

As a parent, I too wish my children grow tall and healthy after eating my radish cake, the ‘GO’, and have a head start in the New Year.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157623330067415/show/

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Pastrami Rye Sourdough - no, not a sandwich


 


Got this idea from "Flavored Breads: Recipes from Mark Miller's Coyote Cafe", it reconstructs the classic pastrami on rye sandwich, and makes the ingredients (pastrami slices, onion, mustard, cream, milk, and rye) into a flavorful bread. However, the book only has volume measurements, and the ingredient ratios look rather "interesting" as the result. If I assume 120g of flour per cup, I end up with a 89% hydration level, without counting that 1/2cup of yellow mustard! So I basically changed up the ingredients ratio according to my preference, and turned the bread into a sourdough one too. 


100% starter, 200g


bread flour, 200g


rye flour, 180g


milk, 120g (I used nonfat)


heavy cream, 120g (it add some richness to the bread, just like Russian dressing does to a traditional pastrami rye sandwich)


butter, 28g


salt, 2tsp


mustard, 1/2 cup (I used yellow mustard I had on hand, but the book recommends half Dijon half whole grain mustard, I will try them next time, I image the flavor will be different)


brown sugar, 1tbsp, packed


pepper, 1tsp


onion, 2tbsp, diced (I used some caramelized onion I had on hand)


pastrami, 113g, cut into thin slices


 


- Mix together everything but onion and pastrami, autolyse for 20 minutes.


- Knead until gluten starts to develope, then knead/fold into onion and pastrami. It's a bery stick dough, and my hands were a nice shade of yellow.


- Bulk fermentation for 3.5 hours, S&F at 30, 60, 90 minutes.


- Shape into a batard (a big one, over 2lbs, I was too lazye to divide it), put into a brotform, cover and into the fridge it goes.


- 2nd day (15 hours later), take out and finish proofing (about 100 minutes)


- bake at 430F for an hour, steam for the first 15 minutes as usual.



 


Pretty decent ovenspring and bloom considering all that rye flour, and pastrami



 


Moist crumb, very flavorful. Mustard taste is very noticable, which I like, and I think a better quality/flavor mustard would enhance the bread even more. Pastrami and onion also play dominant roles in the taste.Not the most open crumb, but expect from a rye bread with so much fillings.



 


We all like this bread, tastes great, a meal in itself. The book has other intersting flavor combos that I want to try, but I probably won't use the exact formulas from it.


Chausiubao's picture
Chausiubao

Critique my recipe

So I'm writing a recipe for everyone. Its intended so that anyone, regardless of experience can try to make bread. So far, I've been told that the recipe reads as a technical document. As yet, I'm not sure if thats a good thing or a bad thing. 


But please read and tell me if its not detailed, too detailed, or in general too wordy.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


4.00 Cups Bread Flour
1.00 Cup Water
4.00 Tbsp Water
1.00 Tbsp Instant Yeast
1.00 Tsp Salt
3.00 Tbsp Melted Butter


Notes:


Bread flour has protein content of between 11-14%, the bag should say which, but all purpose works too (generally the more protein the better)


Instant yeast can be mixed directly in with the flour, bread machine yeast works, but if all you can get is active dry yeast use 1.5 tablespoons, and proof it in water with some sugar first, it should bubble (use some of the water you have measured for the bread).


Water at around body temperature is great, around 80-90F (25-30 C), but any hotter and you risk getting the water too hot for the yeast. Use your finger as a thermometer (finger test!), if you can't tell if the water is hot or cold, use it.


(the instructions to this recipe may seem long, but I am describing everything from start to finish in as much detail as I can, really the process is quite simple)


Procedure:


1.) Melt your butter.
2.) Measure out all your ingredients. Mix the flour and yeast in a large mixing bowl, then mix in the salt.
3.) Pour the water and melted butter into the mixing bowl on top of the dry ingredients.
4.) Using one hands, scoop and fold the ingredients in the bowl; with the other hand continuously turn the bowl.


After a few minutes the dough will come together into a sticky mass.


5.) Turn the dough out onto a table and knead the dough by stretching it away from you and folding it towards you.
6.) Seal the fold by pushing the dough against the table.
6.) After sealing the fold give it a quarter turn (turn it 90*) and repeat until the dough is smooth and tacky.


You will know the dough is finished when it is smooth, and just slightly grabs your fingers (tackiness). By this time your hands should be no longer covered in dough (the gluten has settled).


7.) Cover the top of the dough with plastic wrap to prevent oxidation, and boil a small pot of water
8.) Put your mixing bowl into a turned off oven, put the steaming pot of water below it
9.) Let the dough ferment until it has doubled in size (this takes about one hour)
10.) Take the dough out of the bowl and divide it into sixteen equal sized pieces


11.) Beat one egg with salt to make egg wash.
12.) Line a baking pan with parchment paper (dusting with semolina flour, or oiling up the pan also works)
13.) Lay the dough onto the paper seam side down, and brush it with egg wash
14.) Boil some water in a small pot; cover the dough with plastic wrap
15.) Put the baking pan in the oven (with the oven off) along with the steaming water for about 15 min


Press Test: press the dough, it should spring back halfway, thats when you know its proofed


16.) Preheat your oven to 400 F, bake the rolls until they are well browned and sound hollow when thumped


When baking, you must always bake it until it is done!


17.) Let the dough cool before cutting into it


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Thanks


--Gabriel

RachelJ's picture
RachelJ

Scoring

What would you say would be the best thing to use for scoring? I'm currently using a serrated knife as its all I've got. :)


what do you use and what's worked best for you?


shalom!


    -Ra'chel

jsk's picture
jsk

I've just put the dough to proof and can't bake now. Help!

I made the Polish Cottage Rye frome DL's Local breads.


I shaped the dough into a boule and put it in the floured banneton but now I have to get out of the house for a few hours.


The dough in the banneton is now in the fridge.


What sould I do when I come home? Let it stand a bit outside and then bake or immediatly bake the round?


Thanks for the advice !

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