The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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breadsong's picture
breadsong

Semolina Bread with Apricots and Sage from Amy's Bread

Hello,


I was looking a library book this past long weekend - Amy's Bread - and this one piqued my interest. We've had some drizzle and it looks like we're going to have a wet week ahead here in the Pacific Northwest - I thought it might be nice to bake a little sunshine.






This recipe actually made three loaves. I took pictures of two of the three baked loaves; I think the last one turned out the nicest as I got some foil on top before it browned too much. The dough has a nice yellow color from the durum flour. The boules are misted then rolled in medium-grind yellow cornmeal before shaping. Love all that yellowness, and the apricots that taste like sunshine to me... I'm also thinking of Daisy_A's Sourdough Wholemeal Lemon Bread and wondering how this dough might be with lemon zest and other fruits and/or herbs.

I am learning so much reading other people's posts on this site and am grateful to all of the writers and the website manager who contribute so much.  Regards, breadsong


 


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

9/7/10 - 5 Hour Pain Au Levain Batards

Hi All,


I seem to be baking a lot these days...  It's still hot though here in NYC so things are rising fast around here...  Last night I was reading Local Breads by Dan Leader, page 105 which talks about the Poilane bakery loading their breads into the oven every 2 hours...  I wanted to see how quickly I could make a pain au levain, assuming the levain was ripe and ready...  Also, a have recently converted my storage sourdough starter from liquid to very stiff (50% hydration).  Here's what happened:


Stiff Levain Recipe:


400g Stone Ground White Whole Wheat Flour (King Arthur)


200g Water


80g Stiff Sourdough Starter (50% hydration)


680g Total Stiff Levain


 


Final Dough Recipe:


1374g AP (King Arthur)


926g Water


32g Kosher Salt


680g Stiff White Whole Wheat Levain (approx 50% hydration)


3012g Total Dough Yield


 


Method of Madness:


9/6/10


5:30pm - Mix stiff levain, knead into ball, cover and let rest.


5:45pm - Knead stiff a few times until smooth, lightly coat with extra virgin olive oil, place in covered plastic tub, refrigerate at 40F 23-36 hrs.  If you are going to make the dough within 12-16 hours, and it's not too hot, then you can probably leave it out on the kitchen counter...


9/7/10


6:35pm - Come home from work, get settled, take stiff levain out of fridge, measure out all ingredients using a digital scale.


6:55pm - In a large mixing bowl, pour in exact amount of water, then cut up the stiff levain into small golf ball sized pieces and place it into the bowl in the water.  Then add all the flour on top, then the salt.  Start mixing with a large rubber spatula until a shaggy dough forms.  Then using wet hands, squish the dough until the levain is well combined, knead for about 10 minutes.  Do all kneading in the bowl without adding any extra flour.  If your hands get sticky, use a plastic scraper to scrape the dough off your hands, then dip your hands in water and continue kneading.


7:10pm to 7:30pm - cover and let rest for 20 minutes.


7:30pm - Turn dough in bowl, and knead for about 15-20 seconds, cover and let rest.


8:00pm - Turn dough in bowl, and knead for about 15-20 seconds, cover and let rest.


8:30pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.


9:00pm to 9:10pm - Divide dough into 4 pieces, preshape into boules, place them seam side down on a proofing board with no extra flour.  Cover and let rest for 20 minutes.


9:30pm - Final shape into batards, place them seam side up in a very lighty floured couche, cover with tea towels and plastic bag, proof for approx 1 hr and 30 minutes.


10:20pm - Place 2 baking stones in oven on 2 different levels along with steam pan, preheat to 550F with convection.


11:10pm - Turn off convection.  Turn out loaves onto peel/flipping board, slash as desired, place into oven directly on stone.  When all the loaves are in, place 1 1/2 cups water into steam pan, close door, turn oven down to 450F, bake for 45 minutes rotating batards halfway through the bake between stones.  After 45 minutes, check weight and internal temp.  They should be about 15% lighter than their pre-baked weight, and the internal temp should be between 205F to 210F.  I prefer 210F.  Turn oven off, and place batards back into oven for 5 minutes.  After this, let batards cool completely before cutting...


12:00am - Done...  Time for sleep...  Pics up tomorrow sometime...


8:50am - Upload pics...


 




 


Tim


 


 


 


 


 

Przytulanka's picture
Przytulanka

I'm finally proud of my bread

 


I am finally proud of my bread...It looks gorgeous. My special thanks for the web


 tutoring go to Australian Baker WARWICK QUINTON.


 


 




 


 


Porridge:


600 h whole-wheat flour


260 g whole-rye flour


100 g buckwheat flakes


850 ml cold water


Mix and flours and water and place in  a box with lid and leave them in the fridge overnight. This method softens the whole grain flours.


 


 


Sourdough:


10 g whole-wheat starter (100% hydration -from the fridge)


100 g  whole-wheat flour


60 g water


Let to ferment for12-14 hours.


 


Remove the box from the fridge and add:


240g altus ( 60 % rye, 40% wheat)


160 g stiff sordough


Mix it through with your hand for a few minutes.


Allow to rest for 30 minutes.


 


Add the salt (24 g ) and work it through the dough. Let to rest for 30 minutes.


Give it turn and allow to stand for 30 minutes.


Continue the process allowing about half an hour between turns until  your  achive silk consistency.


 


Let to ferment for 4-6 hours 


Shape your bread into cylinder, using the flats of your hands.  Brush with water, and dust with buckwheat flakes. Put into the  proofing basket.

Proof the bread for 3 hours . Slash diagonally 4 times.

Set your oven to 500F and bake:

 

  •  15 minutes with steam in 480F.
  •  20 minutes in 450F
  • 15 minutes in 400F.

 

Recipe adapted from: http://www.sourdoughbaker.com.au/recipes/desem-sourdough-recipes/wheat-and-barley-bread.html

 

njbetsy's picture
njbetsy

Looking for a pizza crust that is light and airy with lots of holes

Hi folks,


I know you'll have the answer.  I made Reinhart's Neo-Neopolitan Dough for my friend who is a chef and a culinary teacher.  Her friends liked it very much, but she wanted a lighter, airier and more holey pizza crust.  Do any of you have such a dough?  Thanks in advance.


Betsy


 

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Second Weekend of Bread Baking – Better Doughs, Fewer d’Ohs


The Quest for Great Buns


Friday morning I mixed the Biga for Italian Sourdough, per David’s recipe (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/12485/sourdough-italian-bread-and-sandwich-rolls) The goal: perfect buns.


Friday afternoon, once the Biga had doubled, I massaged it with a dough scraper and decided it was too stiff and gummy/sticky to mix into the dough by hand.   I have no stand mixer, but I staved off panic.  I talked my little KA hand mixer into giving it a go.  Following David’s instructions, I cut the Biga into the dry ingredients.  This  took several comical minutes with a kitchen shears and spatula (think Lucille Ball trying to divide a one pound wad of bubble gum).  It might have worked better with a mini-chain saw (except for the Biga splotches on the ceiling).  Once the Biga was cut up, the hand mixer worked pretty well, and after about 10 minutes with the mixer and 20 or so S&Fs, I had something fairly uniform.


After the primary fermentation with periodic S&Fs, the dough doubled on schedule, and I had a nice silky mound of bread-to-be, the nicest dough I’ve worked in all my (10) days of baking.


IMG_1458


Making a split batch of rolls and a batard gave me a chance to try (and maybe even improve) my shaping skills.  Of the 5 rolls, 3 are pretty much the shape I was going for.  I should have re-shaped the other two, but I was tired and didn’t want to break every last bubble.


IMG_1460


The loaves proofed faster than expected and they had to go into the oven before the stone had preheated enough.  So I didn’t get great oven spring (see http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19452/my-model-great-oven-spring).  Though they were fully baked, the bottoms are blond.  I also forgot to rotate the loaves and my oven heat is apparently pretty uneven.  That said, they looked pretty good on top, and the crumb is nice.


IMG_1471]


IMG_1477]


IMG_1486]


The texture of both crust and crumb is pretty close to what I remember (and like) from David’s previous bakes of this bread, though not quite as airy.  I am happy with the outcome, and happy to have learned the lessons—start pre-heating the oven before you think you need to, and don’t forget to rotate the loaves.


Because the Italian Sourdough got done start-to-finish on Friday, we were able to get to the Ferry Building Farmer’s Market Saturday morning.  Made quite a haul of stone fruit, strawberries, corn and very photogenic vegetables.


IMG_1482


For dinner Saturday, the buns were excellent brushed with garlic-rosemary-infused EVOO and grilled for sandwiches of Teriyaki-marinated local King Salmon, heirloom tomatoes and lemon mayonnaise.  I guess, with the Teriyaki and the Italian bread, we should call these “Orientalian Salmon Sandwiches”.


IMG_1499


And the Batard made great toast Sunday morning, accompanying “Spanish” omelet.


IMG_1501


The main Sunday event, of course, was the lamburgers that started my quest for great buns (hold the snickers).  (See http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19399/iso-easy-great-and-recipe-hamburger-buns).  Using an ancient Greek lamburger recipe I made up—ground lamb leg mixed a day ahead with minced onion, flat leaf parsley and garlic, and oregano, salt and pepper—I charcoal grilled the burgers and the buns (brushed with the same rosemary and garlic-infused EVOO) and layered with feta, heirloom tomatos and lettuce, with a dab of the lemon mayonnaise.   They were even more delicious than they look.


IMG_1507


IMG_1509


The quest was worthwhile and the buns were excellent, but I think these are a bit dense for burger buns.  Good thing lots of bun recipes came to light.


Other Weekend Bakes


In addition to the Italian Sourdough, on Saturday I mixed the dough for, and Sunday I baked, Susan’s Ultimate Sourdough for the third time…and with the best results yet.  Even with less proofing and a very well pre-heated oven, I still didn’t get great oven spring. 


IMG_1503


IMG_1506


The Bread Professor (DMS) thinks maybe my oven vents too much, or I don’t have enough thermal mass to keep the steam going.   He suggests lava rocks, but didn’t say what I should do with them [smileyface].


But I’m happy with the progress.  The texture and flavor are delightful.  My chief bread enthusiast loves the chewiness and the flavor.


And Saturday night I mixed up the liquid levain for Hamelman’s Vermont Sourdough; and I mixed the dough Sunday morning and baked two batards Sunday night.  I made sure they were proofed right, and in addition to the usual cast iron skillet for steam, I spritzed them with water after about 10 minutes. 


My shaping skills have improved some (I keep watching Floyd’s great batard-shaping video).  And I got better, if not really good, oven spring.


IMG_1514


Still, not a real open crumb.  But mighty tasty.


IMG_1518


To top the weekend, this morning we had the famous Salmon Hash with a toast medley.


IMG_1525


Since the learning experience for a novice baker is enjoyable in itself, the (mostly) good bread is just a bonus.  I had the chance in one weekend to try three different sourdoughs, one with a Biga and one with a liquid levain, and different formulas, and different flavors.   I got better at shaping batards, and at reading the dough’s signals.  I do need to figure out how to get better oven spring; I’d love to get a more open crumb.


Some time this week, I’ll have to make Sourdough Pizza dough, for a Greek Pizza with the leftover lamburger and Feta.


Thanks to TFL (especially David) for all the great tips, and the fun.


Glenn

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

5-Grain Levain from Hamelman's "Bread"

Today, I baked Hamelman's "5-grain Levain" from "Bread."


Various TFL blogs have featured this bread. They can be found by searching the site. The recipe was posted by fleur-de-liz here: Eric: Hamelman's Five-Grain Levain. She was a very active contributor to TFL at the time I joined and an inspiration to me. She encouraged me to bake this bread for the first time way back when. It is, indeed, among the most delicious breads I've ever made or tasted.




David

BLHNYC's picture
BLHNYC

Raisin Challah

Hi Everyone-


With the Jewish holidays right around the corner, I am wondering if any of you have a raisin challah recipe that you recommend. In the past I have made Nick Maligieri's braided challah but I am looking for something new- and with raisins. Suggestions for the round-shaping are welcome too!


Thanks!
Beth

dvuong's picture
dvuong

Another Stretch and Fold Technique post

I decided to try PR's Pain a l'ancienne recipe from ABED last night.  I noticed in this book that he introduced the S&F technique (I'm not sure if it was introduced in any of his other books).  From reading the forums, many of you suggest S&F at least 20 minute intervals but in PR's book, he suggests 10 minute intervals.  Is there any logic behind this?  It would be great if I could S&F all doughs at 10 minutes since it would save a lot of time.


I apologize if this question has been asked before - I am very new to bread baking!  I've searched the forum and couldn't find an exact answer to my question.  Also, would S&F work on all types of doughs or would hand kneading be a superior method for some?  In the past, I kneaded in my mixer but have now switched to hand manipulating my doughs.  I find it much more satisfying and therapeutic!


TIA!!

JoPi's picture
JoPi

Bread from 1918

Here you will find a Government issued Bread book from October 1918  titled "Victory Breads".  It's just a few pages with some WWI info in there.  


 


http://www.archive.org/stream/victorybreads00unit#page/n1/mode/2up


 


JP

fastmail98's picture
fastmail98

Anyone Use a French Bread Pan?

Good Morning, Fellow Bakers...:)


Perhaps this question has been asked, but when making baguettes yesterday I was cuious about another kitchen gadget: French bread pans. Does anyone use them? My baguettes come out fine, but I would like a more tubular shape. Perhaps if I added more surface tension on the dough I would get it, eh? The pans available through Chicago Metallic, etc. are coated with a non-stick coating that, like all of the coatings, release chemical fumes at 500 degrees or so (depending on whose tests you read). I pre-heat my oven to 500 degrees to get my baking stone really hot and to use a steam pan for a firmer crust. Any suggestions for a non-non-stick French bread pan? Thanks!




Russ

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